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Book a Week 2017 - BW46: Robert Louis Stevenson


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#1 Robin M

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Posted 12 November 2017 - 02:00 PM

Happy Sunday and welcome to week 46 in our 2017 adventurous prime reading year.   Greetings to all our readers and those following our progress. Mister Linky is available weekly on 52 Books in 52 Weeks  to share a link to your book reviews.

 

 

In honor of Robert Louis Stevenson who was born November 13, 1850.

 

 

 

Swallows Travel To and Fro

 

 

 

Swallows travel to and fro,

And the great winds come and go,

And the steady breezes blow,

Bearing perfume, bearing love.

Breezes hasten, swallows fly,

Towered clouds forever ply,

And at noonday, you and I

See the same sunshine above.

 

Dew and rain fall everywhere,

Harvests ripen, flowers are fair,

And the whole round earth is bare

To the moonshine and the sun;

And the live air, fanned with wings,

Bright with breeze and sunshine, brings

Into contact distant things,

And makes all the countries one.

 

Let us wander where we will,

Something kindred greets us still;

Something seen on vale or hill

Falls familiar on the heart;

So, at scent or sound or sight,

Severed souls by day and night

Tremble with the same delight -

Tremble, half the world apart.

 

 

 

Monday is Robert Louis Stevenson day in Edinburgh where they are celebrating his works and life and following in his footsteps as well as having readings of his stories.  Check out the RLS website where you will find his books, essays, and poetry online as well as a travel page dedicated to his journeys.  

 

 

Where are your reading adventures taking you this week? 

 

 

Link to week 45


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#2 Robin M

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Posted 12 November 2017 - 02:08 PM

My reading has been all over the place this past week.   Palin's Pole to Pole is a bit dry, so I'll give it a few more pages before diving into something else. Also reading

 

Paperback:  Iris Johansen's Body of Lies  in her Eve Duncan series

Read aloud with James: Leon Leyson's The Boy on the Wooden Box as well as Benjamin Netanyahu's Fighting Terrorism

Ebook:  Seanan McGuire's A Red Rose Chain in her October Day series and  Tyler Henry's Between Two Worlds

Audiobook:  Faith Hunter's Blood Cross in her Jane Yellowrock series.

 

My guys are being encouragingly pushy and asking me all kinds of questions about my writing which had come to a complete halt. Digging out writing books to see which one will give me the impetus to put pen to paper and brainstormed more ideas for the blog. 


Edited by Robin M, 12 November 2017 - 02:11 PM.

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#3 Woodland Mist Academy

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Posted 12 November 2017 - 02:17 PM

We loved A Child's Garden of Verses!  "The Swing" was a favorite. Such fond memories of reciting it on the swings! 

 

 

The Swing

 

by Robert Louis Stevenson
How do you like to go up in a swing, 
   Up in the air so blue? 
Oh, I do think it the pleasantest thing 
   Ever a child can do! 
 
Up in the air and over the wall, 
   Till I can see so wide, 
Rivers and trees and cattle and all 
   Over the countryside— 
 
Till I look down on the garden green, 
   Down on the roof so brown— 
Up in the air I go flying again, 
   Up in the air and down!

 


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#4 Scoutermom

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Posted 12 November 2017 - 02:27 PM

I'm sticking to it and have finished 45 books. My To Read pile is so large it's a bit intimidating. I'm plugging away with things though.


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#5 Mothersweets

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Posted 12 November 2017 - 02:33 PM

I just  now finished The Angry Tide (Poldark #7) by Winston Graham. This was 600 pages and I could not put it down! I find Graham's writing makes me feel happy - even when things aren't so sunny in Cornwall.https://www.goodread...show/2148553178

 

Also read The Devil in the White City by Erik Larsen. I had a hard time finishing this one. I mainly did just so I could see how the serial killer was caught and how they pieced together his murder methods. It was very gruesome. :(. The writing wasn't as strong as I had expected it to be. The author sometimes would throw in facts about random people and events and it didn't really tie anything together. I was expecting more of a David McCullough kind of cohesion of facts and it just wasn't there (guess that's why David McCullough is so special  :001_wub: ). I had listened to a podcast about the Columian Exposition a few years ago - maybe it was on the History Chicks? and it was so interesting, but reading it now I just wanted to be done with it. I almost felt tainted reading it  and I'm not usually squeamish about this sort of thing. https://www.goodread...rom_search=true


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#6 mumto2

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Posted 12 November 2017 - 02:40 PM

I have a huge stack of books in progress also. Probably the most relevant one of the moment s The Zig Zag Girl by Elly Griffiths https://www.goodread...rom_search=true. It's the first in a new to me series by one of my favorite authors and seems to be hitting the spot although I have avoided it since it was published. This is one of those times when I am very grateful for Robin's challenges because if I didn't need a Z rather desperately for topaz I would not be listening to this book. It's set in England post WWII and at this point at least is solving a murder involving members of a special MI team that speciality was diverting this enemy using principles derived from magic tricks. Both the suspects and the lead detective were members of the MI team.

I also finished listening to a rather dated cozy by Elizabeth Peters that was first published in 1969. The Camelot Caper is a prequel to her Vicki Bliss series. All I can say is it was charming and funny if you are like me and have a tendency to travel with a guide book after having memorised two others. The heroine was definitely someone I could be friends with! In terms of Brit Tripping this book has four counties mentioned so a gold mine.... Wiltshire, Devonshire, Cornwall, and Somerset. I wish I had waited! But I have decided to start keeping notes now for Amy and Loesje. ;)
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#7 Negin

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Posted 12 November 2017 - 02:47 PM

 

We loved A Child's Garden of Verses!  "The Swing" was a favorite. Such fond memories of reciting it on the swings! 

 

 

The Swing

 

by Robert Louis Stevenson
How do you like to go up in a swing, 
   Up in the air so blue? 
Oh, I do think it the pleasantest thing 
   Ever a child can do! 
 
Up in the air and over the wall, 
   Till I can see so wide, 
Rivers and trees and cattle and all 
   Over the countryside— 
 
Till I look down on the garden green, 
   Down on the roof so brown— 
Up in the air I go flying again, 
   Up in the air and down!

 

Robert Louis Stevenson is probably one of our favorites and this poem in particular. We love "A Child's Garden of Verses". 

 

Also read The Devil in the White City by Erik Larsen. I had a hard time finishing this one. I mainly did just so I could see how the serial killer was caught and how they pieced together his murder methods. It was very gruesome. :(. The writing wasn't as strong as I had expected it to be. The author sometimes would throw in facts about random people and events and it didn't really tie anything together.

I read this a few years ago and felt exactly the same as you did. 


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#8 mumto2

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Posted 12 November 2017 - 02:50 PM

We loved A Child's Garden of Verses!  "The Swing" was a favorite. Such fond memories of reciting it on the swings! 
 
 

The Swing

 


by Robert Louis Stevenson




How do you like to go up in a swing, 

   Up in the air so blue? 

Oh, I do think it the pleasantest thing 

   Ever a child can do! 

 

Up in the air and over the wall, 

   Till I can see so wide, 

Rivers and trees and cattle and all 

   Over the countryside— 

 

Till I look down on the garden green, 

   Down on the roof so brown— 

Up in the air I go flying again, 

   Up in the air and down!

 

Very similar memory here when I saw the intro! I miss poetry and swings but do appreciate being allowed to close the bathroom door! :lol:


 

My reading has been all over the place this past week.   Palin's Pole to Pole is a bit dry, so I'll give it a few more pages before diving into something else. Also reading
 
Paperback:  Iris Johansen's Body of Lies  in her Eve Duncan series
Read aloud with James: Leon Leyson's The Boy on the Wooden Box as well as Benjamin Netanyahu's Fighting Terrorism
Ebook:  Seanan McGuire's A Red Rose Chain in her October Day series and  Tyler Henry's Between Two Worlds
Audiobook:  Faith Hunter's Blood Cross in her Jane Yellowrock series.
 
My guys are being encouragingly pushy and asking me all kinds of questions about my writing which had come to a complete halt. Digging out writing books to see which one will give me the impetus to put pen to paper and brainstormed more ideas for the blog.


The first book in the October Days series is sitting in my pile. I am so looking forward to it after read both your and Erin's reviews.

I used to love the Eve Duncan series. Is this a reread or the first time through for you?
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#9 Negin

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Posted 12 November 2017 - 02:54 PM

I read Dogs as I See Them - 5 Stars - The older I get, the more I love dogs. This charming book was out of print for many years. It’s now back in print with a forward by the author Ann Patchett. The dog sketches are captured beautifully. If you love dogs, this book is an absolute joy. If you know someone who loves dogs, this would be a perfect gift. 

 

41A7VuFFBQL._SX258_BO1,204,203,200_.jpg

 

I haven't read much else. I've started and given up on a few books. Not sure what I'll be reading next.

 

Two Kindle books on sale today:

 

A Tale of Love and Darkness

 

The Kingdom by the Sea

 

9780151008780.jpg         9780618658954.jpg

 

MY RATING SYSTEM

5 Stars

Fantastic, couldn't put it down

4 Stars

Really Good

3 Stars

Enjoyable

2 Stars

Just Okay – nothing to write home about

1 Star

Rubbish – waste of my money and time. Few books make it to this level, since I usually give up on them if they’re that bad.


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#10 Zebra

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Posted 12 November 2017 - 02:55 PM

I finished listening to Unaccustomed Earth by Jhumpa Lahiri.   It was a book of short stories, and was a little slow in the middle.  Overall I enjoyed it.  I have a real affinity for books about the Indian American experience.

 

I also finished Saints for All Occasions by J Courtney Sullivan.   This was the same author as the book Maine.   I know I read Maine, but I could not remember if I liked it or not and if I should read another book by this author.  Saints for All Occasions started out slowly, but I ended up getting caught up in it.   It was about 2 sisters from Ireland who came to America in the 50s, and shared a big secret that dictated the rest of their lives.   

 

I am currently reading Vinegar Girl by Anne Tyler, which apparently is a retelling of The Taming of the Shrew.   I have zero familiarity with that play, so whatever allusions will be completely lost on me.


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#11 Ali in OR

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Posted 12 November 2017 - 03:02 PM

This week I finished A Hope More Powerful than the Sea and the Brother Cadfael mystery I was reading for the Middle Ages square and enjoyed both. I updated my Bingo card and need 3 more to finish blackout, so I'm working on that now. I found it very difficult to find a bestseller I wanted to read from dh's or dc's birth years. So many books are the next in a series I don't read, or Tom Clancy stuff I don't read, or good books that I already read. The one I put on hold is Nicholas Sparks' Nights in Rodanthe--not an author I've been interested in reading, but my motivating factor is mostly to pick shortish, easy reading at this point in the year. For Female Adventure I have Circling the Sun on hold. For Science Fiction, I bought an Andrea Host book for my kindle because I enjoyed her Touchstone series and Medair series. So that's the one I'm reading now--And All the Stars. I'm enjoying it and it's going quickly.


Edited by Ali in OR, 12 November 2017 - 03:03 PM.

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#12 Woodland Mist Academy

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Posted 12 November 2017 - 03:05 PM

 

Also read The Devil in the White City by Erik Larsen. I had a hard time finishing this one. I mainly did just so I could see how the serial killer was caught and how they pieced together his murder methods. It was very gruesome. :(. The writing wasn't as strong as I had expected it to be. The author sometimes would throw in facts about random people and events and it didn't really tie anything together. I was expecting more of a David McCullough kind of cohesion of facts and it just wasn't there (guess that's why David McCullough is so special  :001_wub: ). I had listened to a podcast about the Columian Exposition a few years ago - maybe it was on the History Chicks? and it was so interesting, but reading it now I just wanted to be done with it. I almost felt tainted reading it  and I'm not usually squeamish about this sort of thing. https://www.goodread...rom_search=true

 

 

 

I read this a few years ago and felt exactly the same as you did. 

 

The Devil in the White City is on my list. Thanks, both of you, for the warning.

 

 

 

 
Very similar memory here when I saw the intro! I miss poetry and swings but do appreciate being allowed to close the bathroom door! :lol:

 

Good point!  :laugh:  

 

I'm thinking a porch swing and/or maybe an old-fashioned tree swing might be nice, though... (Adding to my spring to-dos...)


Edited by Woodland Mist Academy, 12 November 2017 - 03:06 PM.

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#13 Kareni

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Posted 12 November 2017 - 03:11 PM

A one day only currently free classic for Kindle readers ~

 

In Praise of Folly by Desiderius Erasmus

 

"This sixteenth-century religious satire by a Renaissance critic and theologian is “a masterpiece of humor and wise irony” (Johan Huizinga, Dutch historian).

At the onset of his hugely successful satire of medieval European society, Dutch scholar Desiderius Erasmus invokes the goddess Folly, daughter of Youth and Wealth, who was raised by Drunkenness and Ignorance. She’s followed by idolatrous companions, including Self-love, Flattery, Pleasure, and Laziness.
 
Through Folly’s wry and humorous speech, Erasmus denounces the superstitions and nonsensical eccentricities of his contemporary theologians and churchmen, monastic life, and the condition of the Catholic Church. An immensely influential humanist text, In Praise of Folly helped lay the groundwork for the Protestant Reformation and marked a transitional time between medieval beliefs and modern ideals."

**

Also currently free ~

 

 

Tristan Finch: A Romance Novel  by Jacqueline Spencer

 

Regards,

Kareni


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#14 Woodland Mist Academy

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Posted 12 November 2017 - 03:34 PM

I finally read The Lost Art of Dress: The Women Who Once Made America Stylish by Linda Przybyszewski. It was discussed on these threads about a year ago. The book mentioned a shift coming that would include more formal dress. I haven't noticed a shift-- other than a few teens who like to wear suits on a day-to-day basis (much to the astonishment of their families). Is anyone else noticing a shift? Even at a recent Renaissance Faire  --jeans and t-shirts. I would guess that with more people working from home, the casual, anything goes dress code will continue for the foreseeable future.

 

There weren't really any concrete modern suggestions in the book. (Forgivable, as that wasn't the book's goal.)  I was also a bit disappointed in the author's photo -- I had hoped for a great example of modern artful dress. No such luck.

 

The book did, however, do what it set out to do. It is a delightful history of the Dress Doctors.


Edited by Woodland Mist Academy, 12 November 2017 - 03:42 PM.

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#15 loesje22000

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Posted 12 November 2017 - 04:24 PM

Theo Thijssen:
https://en.m.wikiped...i/Theo_Thijssen

Is an Dutch author that everybody knows from 'kees, the boy' but never actually has read.
About two hears ago I tried Kees de Jongen, and found it a terrible boek. The author switch between fantasy and the real world all time without notice so I had to reread parts when we were suddenly in the other world.

So I decided never to read Thijssen again.
Untill Tress started to read Thijssen this year, and felt in love with other titels of him: Schoolland and Happy Class.

So I borrowed Happy Class from her and read the book this week.
I really, really liked it.

Although the author is from for the fifties, the stories about the class are written such way I imagined It happened in my own elementary school.
Dealing with school inspectors as well due to homeschooling, I had to smile when there becomes a new way of keeping some records and it effects the whole school although some teachers jus ignore the new rules.

I just liked the book :)
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#16 Penguin

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Posted 12 November 2017 - 04:36 PM

Theo Thijssen:
https://en.m.wikiped...i/Theo_Thijssen

Is an Dutch author that everybody knows from 'kees, the boy' but never actually has read.
About two hears ago I tried Kees de Jongen, and found it a terrible boek. The author switch between fantasy and the real world all time without notice so I had to reread parts when we were suddenly in the other world.

So I decided never to read Thijssen again.
Untill Tress started to read Thijssen this year, and felt in love with other titels of him: Schoolland and Happy Class.

So I borrowed Happy Class from her and read the book this week.
I really, really liked it.

Although the author is from for the fifties, the stories about the class are written such way I imagined It happened in my own elementary school.
Dealing with school inspectors as well due to homeschooling, I had to smile when there becomes a new way of keeping some records and it effects the whole school although some teachers jus ignore the new rules.

I just liked the book :)

Your post made me giggle. I’m glad to know that other languages have authors everyone knows about but nobody reads.
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#17 Raifta

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Posted 12 November 2017 - 05:04 PM

The Devil in the White City is on my list. Thanks, both of you, for the warning.

 

 

 

 I just reached over and plucked that right off my book shelf and deposited it into the donation box.

 

Finished The Beach by Alex Garland - it struck me as very juvenile and also dated, being written in 1997ish.  Set in Thailand with a cast of characters of Western 'travelers', it seemed that the author, who was very young when he wrote it, was trying to figure out his own morals and what he wanted his life to be like.  I won't be keeping that on The Shelf.

 

Trying to find a new read aloud for evenings with the kids (10 and 11, not that into fantasy/sci-fi and my preference is for older books because they are simply much more pleasant to read out loud).  We have been striking out lately.  Ideas welcome.  


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#18 Woodland Mist Academy

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Posted 12 November 2017 - 05:21 PM

 

 

Trying to find a new read aloud for evenings with the kids (10 and 11, not that into fantasy/sci-fi and my preference is for older books because they are simply much more pleasant to read out loud).  We have been striking out lately.  Ideas welcome.  

 

We enjoyed My Family and Other Animals about that age, but it's not for everyone.


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#19 ErinE

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Posted 12 November 2017 - 05:41 PM

Books read the prior week: I finished several horror books started in October: Lovecraft’s Monsters, City Infernal, and Ararat. Horror was my favorite genre when I was younger. King, Koontz, Saul - I would read the books as soon as they appeared in the library. I think my loss of interest was partially the genre shifted away from me and I grew less interested in scary stories. City Infernal had too much gore-ography for me. Ararat, while scary, ended with a possible child in danger (or dangerous child). Lovecraft’s Monsters, the best of the three, was still too gory for my tastes though the reader Bernard Clark will be on my watch-for list.

 

When I was pregnant with my first child, everyone wanted to talk to me about the recent murder of a pregnant woman. No matter how many times I explained I didn’t want to hear it, people would insist that I needed to hear this! one! thing! I finally just resorted to sticking my fingers in my ears and humming. Childish, yes, but it got the point across. I think that was the start of my falling out with horror. Child in peril stories hold little appeal for me now and too many horror stories use it.

 

I also read two great nature reads: The Sound of a Wild Snail Eating and The Soul of an Octopus. Rose recommended Snail and it was a lovely insight into a bedridden woman’s musings on her pet snail. Octopus was a fantastic look at the eight-armed creature plus the action mostly takes place in the Boston Aquarium, one of my favorite places to visit. Both the book and the aquarium are highly recommended. A great Kraken! read if you’re following Rose’s Big Bingo Challenge.

 

For literature, I was on a trickster kick a few weeks ago so Stacia recommended Mr. Fox. Thank you, Stacia! It was a fantastic book leaving me wondering what is real, what isn’t, where is this story going? Lovely, magical, charming, poignant – a wonderful book. I also finished another Ishiguro - When We Were Orphans, his take on the British detective story. It absolutely wasn’t what I expected as the author takes the unreliable narrator to its extreme.

 

I finally, finally finished The Myth of the Eternal Return, a short book, but written (translated?) in a clumsy style. I believe it was one of the first books on the history of comparative religion/mythology. A must-read if you're interested in the subject, but not one of my favorite books.

 

And to wrap up the prior week's reads, there's Home Deus: A Brief History of Tomorrow which seemed promising, but ultimately fell short of my expectations. Harari, like many enamored with Big Data, believes humans to simply be a series of algorithms and if good enough formulas are created, outcomes can be perfectly predicted. I've assisted in the creation of predictive models and I adore them. There's something soothing about dealing with massive rows of numbers, cleaning up data, making everything fit neatly into cells and tables and formulas. History can be forced to behave. But ultimately, as anyone who's worked with models knows, they're only predictive, not descriptive, and only within certain statistical boundaries. Humans have a tendency to refuse to conform. 

 

Books read last week:

  • Hex by Thomas Olde Heveult. Horror. A witch haunts a New England town. Originally written in Dutch, but translated into English and re-located to the US. I'm trying to finish up my October spooky reads.
  • A Pale View of the Hills by Kazuo Ishiguro. Literature. After the suicide of her firstborn child in England, a Japanese woman reflects on her pregnancy in Nagasaki, Japan. Ishiguro’s first book.
  • A Conjuring of Light by V.E. Schwab. Fantasy. A magician fights the summoned magic of another realm. An excellent end to the series. I highly recommend all three books in the series.
  • The Lost City of the Monkey God by Douglas Preston. Nonfiction – Science. A journalist travels with archaeologists in their search for a lost Mesoamerican city. One of my favorite middle-grade series is Scientists in the Field which is probably why I enjoyed this book so much. There’s snakes, bugs, spiders, and flesh-eating parasites, but it’s an interesting look at the steps people will take to pursue their passions.
  • Hallelujah Anyway: Rediscovering Mercy by Anne Lamott. Religious Philosophy. I don’t think Lamott’s musings are to my taste though I know many people find her thoughts inspirational. A 240s Big Bingo Challenge read, though my library got rid of the Dewey Decimal system so I can't say for sure (I've already ranted about the change so I'll spare everyone here).
  • Devil’s Cut (The Bourbon Kings #3) by J.R. Ward. Contemporary Romance. A former playboy fights to save his family business.
  • The Power of Myth by Joseph Campbell. Nonfiction – Mythology. The author of The Hero With a Thousand Faces and The Hero’s Journey muses on society, symbolism, and mythology.

I'm currently listening to The Story of Human Language by John McWhorter. I'm not usually interested in linguistics, but McWhorter is an engaging lecturer. I especially enjoy the discussions on languages outside the traditional Western European focus. I have one or two last horror reads that I'm racing to finish, the final two Ishiguro books I haven't read, and a Pratchett that I didn't realize I had buried in my TBR stack. Last week's finance topic led me to search out a few books I'd been meaning to read so I have The Undoing Project, a look at behavioral economics and the rise of Big Data, and The Black Swan, a book on predicting improbable events.


Edited by ErinE, 12 November 2017 - 06:49 PM.

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#20 Raifta

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Posted 12 November 2017 - 06:01 PM

We enjoyed My Family and Other Animals about that age, but it's not for everyone.

 

That is a great idea. We've just finished watching season 1 of The Durrells on Corfu and the kids are intrigued by the notion of being that age and being set free on an island full of animals.  I read a whole bunch of his books many years ago and enjoyed them all.


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#21 Matryoshka

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Posted 12 November 2017 - 06:10 PM

Only finished two books this week:

 

130. Burning Bright by Melissa McShane - X-Men in the Regency era, with pirates.  I loved it. For the Paranormal square.  5 stars.

 

131. The Case of the Cryptic Crinoline by Nancy Springer (audiobook) - mid-grades or YA mystery starring Sherlock Holmes' little sister Enola.  I liked it okay, but sometimes it got a bit too mid-grade for me - really, how could it take anyone, much less someone supposedly so brilliant, TWO CHAPTERS to figure out that a code with only two symbols is Morse Code?  Really??? For the Crimean War square. 2.5 stars.

 

Currently reading:

 

En busca del unicornio / In Search of the Unicorn - I should probably have taken a cue from others here and abandoned this (I think I can sometimes be a bit too tenacious with books).  I decided to read this for the Middle Ages square because my previous choice, Sunne in Splendour, was super-long.  But this one is dragging so much I think I could have gotten through the longer book more quickly.  Or maybe I should have just tried a Brother Cadfael mystery.  Over the halfway point now... And the other reason I picked it was that none of my remaining squares at the time had Spanish selections and I wanted a Spanish book. BUT just now Overdrive came out with a bunch of new Spanish titles that fit great into some squares, so that reason ends up being dumb too.  Oh, well...

 

Cloud Atlas (ebook) - been reading this slow on purpose because it seemed like I had almost no ebooks left on my list except two that I'm on hold for anyway, so I was prioritizing hardcopy books.  But, as mentioned above, Overdrive just came out with a slew of books that work, so time to finish.  It's due in a few days anyway.  :)  Strange book, but enjoying it.  But considering the split stories I probably should have not taken it so slow - sometimes having a hard time remembering the details of the first halves of the stories.

 

After the Quake by Murakami (audiobook) - My other audio ended and the library was closed for Veteran's Day and I had a 1.5 hour car ride yesterday, so this was what I found available from Overdrive (yay for downloading).  Liking it so far.

 

Coming Up:

 

Trying to finish as many Bingo rows as possible, while still enjoying what I'm reading.  I've definitely found some awesome things I might not have read otherwise, but in other ways as I'm trying to get things done, I find myself reading short and easy things for squares I'd read something much more meaty on if I had more time (like a silly Crinoline mystery instead of The History of the Crimean War).

 

And speaking of BigBingo, I've got 17 rows done, 5 more rows with only 1 book left and 2 rows with 2 books left, which will put me over my goal of 1/2 of the BigBingo rows done - and then ones I may not get to but might..., 3 rows with 3 books left, one with 4 and one with 5 (ends up I'm reading books in those rows anyway for non-Bingo reasons, so they'll end up with less to go, so I might try to finish).

 

This being so close to the end of the year, I've ordered every single of those books from the Library, Overdrive, or Amazon if the first two don't have it, so I have all the books at hand and can pick them up as needed.  :)


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#22 Woodland Mist Academy

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Posted 12 November 2017 - 06:17 PM

 The Black Swan, a book on predicting improbable events.

 

You mentioned several interesting books -- thanks! This one reminded me of a recent article in The Economist about might-have-beens (near misses) of rare events and counterfactual risk analysis. I'm adding The Black Swan to my list and look forward to your review.


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#23 mumto2

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Posted 12 November 2017 - 06:57 PM

ErinE, I am still waiting for A Conjuring of Light. Glad to know it is as good as the rest of the series!

I read Dogs as I See Them - 5 Stars - The older I get, the more I love dogs. This charming book was out of print for many years. It’s now back in print with a forward by the author Ann Patchett. The dog sketches are captured beautifully. If you love dogs, this book is an absolute joy. If you know someone who loves dogs, this would be a perfect gift.

41A7VuFFBQL._SX258_BO1,204,203,200_.jpg

I haven't read much else. I've started and given up on a few books. Not sure what I'll be reading next.

Two Kindle books on sale today:

A Tale of Love and Darkness

The Kingdom by the Sea

9780151008780.jpg9780618658954.jpg

MY RATING SYSTEM
5 Stars
Fantastic, couldn't put it down
4 Stars
Really Good
3 Stars
Enjoyable
2 Stars
Just Okay – nothing to write home about
1 Star
Rubbish – waste of my money and time. Few books make it to this level, since I usually give up on them if they’re that bad.



You just solved one of my present needs! The dog book looks incredible for a dog lover.


I finished listening to Unaccustomed Earth by Jhumpa Lahiri. It was a book of short stories, and was a little slow in the middle. Overall I enjoyed it. I have a real affinity for books about the Indian American experience.

I also finished Saints for All Occasions by J Courtney Sullivan. This was the same author as the book Maine. I know I read Maine, but I could not remember if I liked it or not and if I should read another book by this author. Saints for All Occasions started out slowly, but I ended up getting caught up in it. It was about 2 sisters from Ireland who came to America in the 50s, and shared a big secret that dictated the rest of their lives.

I am currently reading Vinegar Girl by Anne Tyler, which apparently is a retelling of The Taming of the Shrew. I have zero familiarity with that play, so whatever allusions will be completely lost on me.

I have looked at Saints for All Occasions a couple of times. Now that I have read your review I will put it only list. ;)

I keep trying to remember what we did for read alouds at your dc's ages. Many were Sci fi but we did read Swallows and Amazons at about that point. It's a children's classic that we had missed but definitely still enjoyed. https://www.goodread...rom_search=true

Edited by mumto2, 12 November 2017 - 06:58 PM.

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#24 Penguin

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Posted 12 November 2017 - 07:20 PM

We went to DC yesterday, and I finally made it to Politics & Prose bookstore. They are absolutely a huge name around DC. Whenever the big names are in town, Politics & Prose is usually the host. A lot of times, the big name speakers like Isabel Allende and John Green are off-site. Yesterday, we happened upon author Daniel Swift talking about Ezra Pound. The book is The Bughouse: The Poetry, Politics, and Madness of Ezra Pound. I had to drift in and out of listening to him, or I would not have had time to look around. 

 

Today, I indulged in one of my favorite hobbies: rearranging bookshelves. I was trying to find something and then the whole thing got out of hand...


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#25 Angelaboord

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Posted 12 November 2017 - 10:43 PM

Writing my report real quick before I read the thread...

I've been (happily) spending lots of time writing lately! We've also had kids at home for fall break and we just took a trip to see my mom and dad. I thought that the amount of reading I was doing would go down but somehow I got sucked into Diana Gabaldon's books instead.

Since my last post I think I have read:

By Diana Gabaldon:
A Breath of Snow and Ashes (finished this one)

An Echo in the Bone (one of the best in the series, I think. Loved the job she did with William.)

Written in My Own Heart's Blood ( not as good as Echo in the Bone but still kept me reading)

And I'm currently reading The Scottish Prisoner, one of her Lord John Grey books which is mostly about Jamie.

Other books:

Spyridon -- self-published SF romance. The romance isn't too heavy, though, and it's quite clean. Bit clunky, though. Too many accent marks in the names and the world building is confusing. But I got hooked trying to see if the two main characters would ever get together.

Writing 21st Century Fiction - Don Maass. His books both inspire and terrify me. At the end of the day, I think they are hugely helpful.

Another book I can't remember the name of...basically writing inspiration for pantsers. Lots of weird new agey terms like "dreamstorming" but if you can put up with those, very good stuff, especially if you (like me) seem to be congenitally unable to follow an outline. I'll have to look up the name when I'm off my phone.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

Edited by Angelaboord, 12 November 2017 - 10:45 PM.

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#26 Kareni

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Posted 12 November 2017 - 11:50 PM

I recently finished the contemporary romance Complicated by Kristen Ashley.  It was a pleasant read but probably not a book I'll be re-reading.  This author has a very distinctive style, and this was quintessentially a Kristen Ashley book.  (Adult content)

 

"When small town Nebraska sheriff Hixon Drake meets Greta Dare, the connection couldn’t be stronger, but the timing couldn’t be worse.
Dealing with the fallout of a divorce he never wanted and setting up a new home for his kids, Hix becomes that guy, that one he never wanted to be, and puts a stop to things before they can even start. Protecting his kids, and himself, is his only priority.
Greta, on the other hand, has found the place for her and the brother she adores that’s perfect for them—a sleepy little town in Nebraska. She’s learned from life that there are no hopes and dreams. The only thing to look forward to is peace. And that’s what she works hard to build for herself and her brother. Right up until Hix walks into her life.
Hix can’t fight the pull and stay away from Greta for long. And Greta’s finding it hard not to hope for something more with all the promise that is Hix.
But when the first murder that’s happened in over five decades rocks his small, sleepy county, Hix has got to learn to trust again, convince Greta to take a shot with him, and at the same time catch a killer.
In other words, things are definitely…Complicated."

**

 

Today I began the book my book group will be discussing this Thursday.  I read the first one hundred pages today and if I continue at this pace, I should finish on time.  The book is Americanah by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie.

 

Regards,

Kareni


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#27 Kareni

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Posted 12 November 2017 - 11:56 PM

Some bookish things/posts ~

 

two fun lights:   Wooden Folding Book Light and LED Book Light

 

5 Books That Will Kill You  by Ann-Marie Cahill 

 

Emily Wilson Is the First Woman to Translate Homer’s Odyssey into English: The New Translation Is Out Today

 

Regards,

Kareni


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#28 Negin

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Posted 13 November 2017 - 05:39 AM

Some Kindle books on sale today:

 

Olive Kitteridge

 

Gods and Generals

 

Queen Isabella

 

Things Fall Apart

 

9780812971835.jpg  9780345422477.jpg  9780345453204.jpg  9780141023380.jpg


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#29 Penguin

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Posted 13 November 2017 - 08:54 AM

Aggieamy and Woodland Mist Academy, continuing from last week:

 

I share your propensity for time management books and reading about habits. Any favorites (old or new) you would like to recommend?

 

The two classic that I have internalized are Getting Things Done (David Allen)and Organizing from the Inside Out (Julie Morgenstern). 

 

The one that sent me down this path was Confessions of An Organized Housewife (Deniece Schofield). When I discovered her book, there were not many books about getting organized. It didn't matter that she was a SAHM with five kids and I was a working mom with one baby. I read it until it fell apart. I still have it - the pages secured with a rubber band. I even met Deniece Schofield in the late 1990s at an author event and I had her sign my battered copy. Fond memories :)

 

 

 


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#30 SKL

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Posted 13 November 2017 - 09:16 AM

...

Also read The Devil in the White City by Erik Larsen. I had a hard time finishing this one. I mainly did just so I could see how the serial killer was caught and how they pieced together his murder methods. It was very gruesome. :(. The writing wasn't as strong as I had expected it to be. The author sometimes would throw in facts about random people and events and it didn't really tie anything together. I was expecting more of a David McCullough kind of cohesion of facts and it just wasn't there (guess that's why David McCullough is so special  :001_wub: ). I had listened to a podcast about the Columian Exposition a few years ago - maybe it was on the History Chicks? and it was so interesting, but reading it now I just wanted to be done with it. I almost felt tainted reading it  and I'm not usually squeamish about this sort of thing. https://www.goodread...rom_search=true

 

I agree, I did not like the book and felt it could have been done much better.  It was recommended to me by someone I respected, so I kept hoping for it to get better.  Well, I did learn a few things, but I probably could have learned those quicker via a google search.  :p


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#31 SKL

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Posted 13 November 2017 - 09:24 AM

I am reading 2 books for my grown-up reading:  still working through Untangled and I've started So Dear to My Heart by Sterling North.  Both are readable but neither is likely to make me gush.  :p

 

With the kids, I am listening to Oliver Twist.  At least two of us are enjoying it.  :p

 

I have to decide on a new read-aloud.  I have a book about Christmas, but I am not sure if it's too early to start it.  Otherwise I was thinking Strawberry Girl.  At the rate our read-alouds have been going, I think I'd better start on the Christmas one - now to find it ....

 

Oh, and the girls' middle school book selection, which we will start after Oliver Twist, is Harriet the Spy.  I haven't read it before so I'm looking forward to it.


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#32 Butter

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Posted 13 November 2017 - 09:36 AM

I finished reading The Host by Stephenie Meyer.  I never thought I'd say I liked a book by her.  It was good, though slow at times.


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#33 Penguin

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Posted 13 November 2017 - 09:37 AM

I read The Devil in The White City while I was in Chicago. Maybe that’s why I liked it better than y’all.
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#34 Lady Florida.

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Posted 13 November 2017 - 09:55 AM

 

Also read The Devil in the White City by Erik Larsen. I had a hard time finishing this one. I mainly did just so I could see how the serial killer was caught and how they pieced together his murder methods. It was very gruesome. :(. The writing wasn't as strong as I had expected it to be. The author sometimes would throw in facts about random people and events and it didn't really tie anything together. I was expecting more of a David McCullough kind of cohesion of facts and it just wasn't there (guess that's why David McCullough is so special  :001_wub: ). 

 

I tried twice to read that book (once in print, once on audio from Overdrive) and couldn't get through it. It was the writing more than the events that put me off. It just didn't hold my attention.

 

As for McCullough, he can spoil you very quickly so that all other non-fiction has to pass the McCullough test. :)


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#35 mumto2

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Posted 13 November 2017 - 10:02 AM

I am reading 2 books for my grown-up reading:  still working through Untangled and I've started So Dear to My Heart by Sterling North.  Both are readable but neither is likely to make me gush.  :p
 
With the kids, I am listening to Oliver Twist.  At least two of us are enjoying it.  :p
 
I have to decide on a new read-aloud.  I have a book about Christmas, but I am not sure if it's too early to start it.  Otherwise I was thinking Strawberry Girl.  At the rate our read-alouds have been going, I think I'd better start on the Christmas one - now to find it ....
 
Oh, and the girls' middle school book selection, which we will start after Oliver Twist, is Harriet the Spy.  I haven't read it before so I'm looking forward to it.


Harriet the Spy is fun but I loved The Strawberry Girl. Dd loved it too but D's doesn't even remember it. We recently found our copy.

  

I finished reading The Host by Stephenie Meyer.  I never thought I'd say I liked a book by her.  It was good, though slow at times.

 

The Host looks really familiar. It appears to have come out in 2008 so I must of read it before I started recording my books. Glad you enjoyed it.


 

I read The Devil in The White City while I was in Chicago. Maybe that’s why I liked it better than y’all.


That book has been on my list every since it first came out. It's been in the stack a coup!e of times too, but it just hasn't made it to the top. I thought I would like it because I have been to Chicago many times so maybe I still will try to read it at some point.
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#36 Butter

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Posted 13 November 2017 - 10:15 AM

The Host looks really familiar. It appears to have come out in 2008 so I must of read it before I started recording my books. Glad you enjoyed it.

 

Yup, 2008.  Or at least it was on the NYT bestseller list in 2008.  I read it for the BAW Bingo square for bestseller written in child or spouse birth year.  That's the year Adrian was born :)


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#37 JennW in SoCal

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Posted 13 November 2017 - 10:24 AM

Just a quick wave hello before I dive back into a very busy week.

 

I'm "this close" to finishing a relisten to Good Omens. It's one of those book that so many love, and while there is much I like about it, overall I find some of the humor forced, cynical, unoriginal, and a little mean spirited. I never feel that way with Discworld books -- I like how Pratchett gently satirizes us through his books. But the gloves are off in Good Omens and to me at least, it isn't funny. But, as I said, I do like it on the whole -- the plot, the main characters, the message of free will. It's got that Star Trek trope going of the aliens who say, "Oh those humans, they are rather clever and interesting, aren't they?"

 

 


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#38 Lady Florida.

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Posted 13 November 2017 - 10:42 AM

Nothing really new on my reading front. I did start reading Agatha Christie's Murder is Easy and don't remember if I posted that last week. I was supposed to reread Murder on the Orient Express because my IRL book club is planning to go see it if we can find a day and time that works for everyone. I don't feel the need to reread it though. While I like (most) of her books I've never felt the desire to reread any of them.

 

 

Just a quick wave hello before I dive back into a very busy week.

 

I'm "this close" to finishing a relisten to Good Omens. It's one of those book that so many love, and while there is much I like about it, overall I find some of the humor forced, cynical, unoriginal, and a little mean spirited. I never feel that way with Discworld books -- I like how Pratchett gently satirizes us through his books. But the gloves are off in Good Omens and to me at least, it isn't funny. But, as I said, I do like it on the whole -- the plot, the main characters, the message of free will. It's got that Star Trek trope going of the aliens who say, "Oh those humans, they are rather clever and interesting, aren't they?"

 

Waving back.  :seeya:

 

I never read Gaiman or Pratchett but a book club member chose Good Omens as her book a while back. Mostly it was because we had been reading some heavy and/or depressing books and she wanted to lighten things up. I really enjoyed most of it but felt it turned rather dark towards the end. I loved Crowley, always chuckled when his messages came through Queen songs, and would have happily read a book that was mostly about Crowley. I was just meh overall on Good Omens.


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#39 Woodland Mist Academy

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Posted 13 November 2017 - 11:10 AM

Aggieamy and Woodland Mist Academy, continuing from last week:

 

I share your propensity for time management books and reading about habits. Any favorites (old or new) you would like to recommend?

 

The two classic that I have internalized are Getting Things Done (David Allen)and Organizing from the Inside Out (Julie Morgenstern). 

 

The one that sent me down this path was Confessions of An Organized Housewife (Deniece Schofield). When I discovered her book, there were not many books about getting organized. It didn't matter that she was a SAHM with five kids and I was a working mom with one baby. I read it until it fell apart. I still have it - the pages secured with a rubber band. I even met Deniece Schofield in the late 1990s at an author event and I had her sign my battered copy. Fond memories :)

 

You've already mentioned two of my favorite authors in this genre. 

 

David Allen's Getting Things Done is reread worthy for me, as are Julie Morgenstern's books. Time Management from the Inside Out applies her organizing ideas to time. Everything has its place, every activity has its time slot on the time map.  ;)  Her Making Work Work has ideas that apply to many spheres, not just paid employment.

 

Brian Tracy's Eat That Frog tackles procrastination. Do the most dreaded task first. (There. I save you from reading the book.  ;)

 

Franklin Covey has lots of books and helpful products. 

 

Don Aslett has several quick reads with lots of tips on time management, decluttering, organizing, housework, etc. He's a little over-the-top though. If I remember correctly, one book suggests limiting bathroom breaks and meals to be more productive.  :blink:   Um...nevermind... I'll just continue my slacker ways...  ;)


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#40 Kareni

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Posted 13 November 2017 - 11:41 AM

For Harry Potter fans ~

 

Magical Harry Potter Gifts

**

 

A one day only currently free classic for Kindle readers ~

 

Life in the Iron Mills by Rebecca Harding Davis 

 

"A shocking rendering of poverty, tragedy, and desperation in the American North

This shocking depiction of the lives of impoverished Welsh miners in the American North was one of the first novels to expose the brutal realities facing the nation’s poor. Rebecca Harding Davis casts an unflinching gaze into the lives of the destitute, drunk, and desperate in a work that was controversial for its honesty, but popular for its adept storytelling.
 
The story follows Hugh Wolfe, a proud and educated yet desperately poor laborer in an iron mill, and his cousin Deborah, who breaks the law for a chance at a better life for Hugh. If they keep the ill-gotten money, the pair could transcend their hardship, and Hugh could become the talented artist he was born to be; however, keeping the money would mean sacrificing the morals they’ve so stridently adhered to all their lives.
 
First published in 1861, Life in the Iron Mills became notorious for its merciless descriptions of underclass suffering. As relevant today as it was in the nineteenth century, this is a classic, hypnotic tragedy."

 

Regards,

Kareni

 


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#41 mumto2

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Posted 13 November 2017 - 02:54 PM

Just a quick wave hello before I dive back into a very busy week.

I'm "this close" to finishing a relisten to Good Omens. It's one of those book that so many love, and while there is much I like about it, overall I find some of the humor forced, cynical, unoriginal, and a little mean spirited. I never feel that way with Discworld books -- I like how Pratchett gently satirizes us through his books. But the gloves are off in Good Omens and to me at least, it isn't funny. But, as I said, I do like it on the whole -- the plot, the main characters, the message of free will. It's got that Star Trek trope going of the aliens who say, "Oh those humans, they are rather clever and interesting, aren't they?"


Since I know the movie is going to be a must watch in this house I probably should read or listen to the book first. I just went and reserved two.....one is the BBC 4 production. Any idea which one is better?
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#42 Penguin

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Posted 13 November 2017 - 03:33 PM

You've already mentioned two of my favorite authors in this genre. 

 

David Allen's Getting Things Done is reread worthy for me, as are Julie Morgenstern's books. Time Management from the Inside Out applies her organizing ideas to time. Everything has its place, every activity has its time slot on the time map.  ;)  Her Making Work Work has ideas that apply to many spheres, not just paid employment.

 

Brian Tracy's Eat That Frog tackles procrastination. Do the most dreaded task first. (There. I save you from reading the book.  ;)

 

Franklin Covey has lots of books and helpful products. 

 

Don Aslett has several quick reads with lots of tips on time management, decluttering, organizing, housework, etc. He's a little over-the-top though. If I remember correctly, one book suggests limiting bathroom breaks and meals to be more productive.  :blink:   Um...nevermind... I'll just continue my slacker ways...  ;)

Time Management from the Inside Out is actually the one I was thinking of. The time map rocked my world. And before Flylady, there were the Sidetracked Home Executives.


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#43 Woodland Mist Academy

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Posted 13 November 2017 - 05:42 PM

Time Management from the Inside Out is actually the one I was thinking of. The time map rocked my world. And before Flylady, there were the Sidetracked Home Executives.

 

 I found the Flylady website just as helpful as the book. I'm glad I checked it out at the library and didn't buy it. It's been years since I read it, so I might be forgetting something about it, though.

 

 Home Comforts discusses routines a bit as well.

 

:001_wub:  time maps! Franklin Covey sold a couple different paper versions over the years when they carried a Julie Morgenstern line. I was sad when they discontinued it.  I stocked up on the time maps and am careful to ration them.  ;)


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#44 Robin M

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Posted 13 November 2017 - 06:39 PM

I'm at work today so dropping by with the question of the day:

 

If you were to write a book about yourself, what would you name it?  


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#45 aggieamy

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Posted 13 November 2017 - 07:07 PM

Aggieamy and Woodland Mist Academy, continuing from last week:

 

I share your propensity for time management books and reading about habits. Any favorites (old or new) you would like to recommend?

 

The two classic that I have internalized are Getting Things Done (David Allen)and Organizing from the Inside Out (Julie Morgenstern). 

 

The one that sent me down this path was Confessions of An Organized Housewife (Deniece Schofield). When I discovered her book, there were not many books about getting organized. It didn't matter that she was a SAHM with five kids and I was a working mom with one baby. I read it until it fell apart. I still have it - the pages secured with a rubber band. I even met Deniece Schofield in the late 1990s at an author event and I had her sign my battered copy. Fond memories :)

 

You'll laugh but I think I would add the FlyLady book to the list of must read time management books. It's so simple and basic but it really sums up so many productivity books. It's amazing what you can get done just by setting a timer for 15 minutes. I haven't heard of the Confessions book. I'll have to check that out!

 

Just a quick wave hello before I dive back into a very busy week.

 

I'm "this close" to finishing a relisten to Good Omens. It's one of those book that so many love, and while there is much I like about it, overall I find some of the humor forced, cynical, unoriginal, and a little mean spirited. I never feel that way with Discworld books -- I like how Pratchett gently satirizes us through his books. But the gloves are off in Good Omens and to me at least, it isn't funny. But, as I said, I do like it on the whole -- the plot, the main characters, the message of free will. It's got that Star Trek trope going of the aliens who say, "Oh those humans, they are rather clever and interesting, aren't they?"

 

I felt like that too. Perhaps it was just not the time in life for me to read the book but I felt like they weren't gentle jabs at society and religion but instead more of a difficult to ignore punch on the nose.

 

Writing 21st Century Fiction - Don Maass. His books both inspire and terrify me. At the end of the day, I think they are hugely helpful.

Another book I can't remember the name of...basically writing inspiration for pantsers. Lots of weird new agey terms like "dreamstorming" but if you can put up with those, very good stuff, especially if you (like me) seem to be congenitally unable to follow an outline. I'll have to look up the name when I'm off my phone.
 

 

Are you doing NaNoWriMo this year? I'm doing it as a rebel. I've heard Don Maass recommended at least twice this week. Guess this means he should be on my to-read list!

 


 

Trying to find a new read aloud for evenings with the kids (10 and 11, not that into fantasy/sci-fi and my preference is for older books because they are simply much more pleasant to read out loud).  We have been striking out lately.  Ideas welcome.  

 

Have you read any of the Richard Peck books? If not I suggest starting with A Long Way from Chicago. It has been loved by everyone in my house and one set of grandparents.


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#46 aggieamy

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Posted 13 November 2017 - 07:10 PM

You've already mentioned two of my favorite authors in this genre. 

 

David Allen's Getting Things Done is reread worthy for me, as are Julie Morgenstern's books. Time Management from the Inside Out applies her organizing ideas to time. Everything has its place, every activity has its time slot on the time map.  ;)  Her Making Work Work has ideas that apply to many spheres, not just paid employment.

 

Brian Tracy's Eat That Frog tackles procrastination. Do the most dreaded task first. (There. I save you from reading the book.  ;)

 

Franklin Covey has lots of books and helpful products. 

 

Don Aslett has several quick reads with lots of tips on time management, decluttering, organizing, housework, etc. He's a little over-the-top though. If I remember correctly, one book suggests limiting bathroom breaks and meals to be more productive.  :blink:   Um...nevermind... I'll just continue my slacker ways...  ;)

 

 

Time Management from the Inside Out is actually the one I was thinking of. The time map rocked my world. And before Flylady, there were the Sidetracked Home Executives.

 

 

 I found the Flylady website just as helpful as the book. I'm glad I checked it out at the library and didn't buy it. It's been years since I read it, so I might be forgetting something about it, though.

 

 Home Comforts discusses routines a bit as well.

 

:001_wub:  time maps! Franklin Covey sold a couple different paper versions over the years when they carried a Julie Morgenstern line. I was sad when they discontinued it.  I stocked up on the time maps and am careful to ration them.  ;)

 

I started a post and then got sidetracked by doing work before posting it. I came back and posted then read the rest of the thread. I see I missed the whole Flylady discussion.

 

That's very like me to jump into the middle of a discussion with a new idea that was previously discussed. LOL.

 

Off to google time maps ...


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#47 aggieamy

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Posted 13 November 2017 - 07:19 PM

I'm at work today so dropping by with the question of the day:

 

If you were to write a book about yourself, what would you name it?  

 

Sticking with our theme of the day ...

 

Confessions of an UN-Organized Mom.

 

It's been a long day starting with my DEAR husband forgetting to set the alarm this morning so we could leave the lake early and get home in time to get DD to school.


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#48 Woodland Mist Academy

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Posted 13 November 2017 - 07:19 PM

I started a post and then got sidetracked by doing work before posting it. I came back and posted then read the rest of the thread. I see I missed the whole Flylady discussion.

 

That's very like me to jump into the middle of a discussion with a new idea that was previously discussed. LOL.

 

Off to google time maps ...

 

:laugh:


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#49 Raifta

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Posted 13 November 2017 - 08:35 PM

 

 

 

Have you read any of the Richard Peck books? If not I suggest starting with A Long Way from Chicago. It has been loved by everyone in my house and one set of grandparents.

 

We have not.  I will look into these.  They sound great!


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#50 Penguin

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Posted 13 November 2017 - 09:10 PM

 I found the Flylady website just as helpful as the book. I'm glad I checked it out at the library and didn't buy it. It's been years since I read it, so I might be forgetting something about it, though.

 

 Home Comforts discusses routines a bit as well.

 

:001_wub:  time maps! Franklin Covey sold a couple different paper versions over the years when they carried a Julie Morgenstern line. I was sad when they discontinued it.  I stocked up on the time maps and am careful to ration them.  ;)

IIRC, the Sidetracked Home Executives were the inspiration for Flylady. I have also wondered if the Sidetracked Sisters' Happiness File inspired The Happiness Project (which I have not read). I'm old enough that I remember when the Sidetracked Sisters were popular :)


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