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Beginning blending Cvc words- what to use after AAR pre?


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#1 Hilltopmom

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Posted 10 November 2017 - 07:12 AM

Dd, 4.5 is flying through AAR pre. She already knows all her letter sounds now so we’re just combining the end of the program with other stuff.
She begs to “do school” several times a day.
She still gets stuck on rhyming though. I did try introducing sight words but she looked at me like I was a crazy lady those few times, lol.
I wanted to start working on blending with her, but don’t quite know where to start. I’m open to adding a new curriculum since AAR is going fast.
From posts here it seems like there’s a big jump from AAR pre to AAR level 1. I’ve also seen LOE Foundations suggested but she is not ready for a bunch of writing yet. Can you skip the writing parts?
Other good next steps after AAR pre?- only for LA, math I’ve got.

She will be going to ps for K next fall. After having my big kids go to ps for K/1, I realize that although school may teach reading, it’s up to me to be sure she’s actually learning it, so we will continue at home until she’s a confident reader.

ETA- I’m a preschool Special Ed teacher, so I know kids this age but my students are still working on colors, counting, etc

Thanks

Edited by Hilltopmom, 10 November 2017 - 07:15 AM.


#2 JudoMom

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Posted 10 November 2017 - 07:15 AM

I like Phonics Pathways. Plenty of practice.

#3 xahm

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Posted 10 November 2017 - 07:52 AM

ProgressivePhonics.com  All free, and lots of practice.  We use it as our primary, but I bet it would work well as practice.


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#4 barnwife

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Posted 10 November 2017 - 07:59 AM

In your shoes I'd definitely try Progressive Phonics. It's free. Phonics Pathways is fine, but it's just lists of words for kids to read, and therefore not as appealing (to my kids and me anyway).

Before trying either though, I'd make sure she can blend orally. If her brain isn't there, it's just not there. (So every once in a while I ask my current 4 yo "if we say "b a"  fast what do we have?" He can't do that yet, so I haven't started formal phonics with him.)



#5 medawyn

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Posted 10 November 2017 - 08:21 AM

My 4.5 yo loved the I See Sam books after AAR Pre. He’s happily reading Level 4 a few months later.

#6 wendyroo

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Posted 10 November 2017 - 09:42 AM

Before trying either though, I'd make sure she can blend orally. If her brain isn't there, it's just not there. (So every once in a while I ask my current 4 yo "if we say "b a"  fast what do we have?" He can't do that yet, so I haven't started formal phonics with him.)

 

:iagree:  :iagree:

 

I second this.  My kids have all learned their letter sounds and phonemic awareness skills (first/middle/last sounds, rhyming, etc) very early, and then we had to sit tight for a prolonged period until they were developmentally ready to blend words.  We periodically play oral blending games (I'm thinking of an animal whose name is /f/ /i/ /sh/) and one week they are looking at me blankly and guessing tiger and the next week it clicks and they can successfully blend the sounds.

 

My four year old just started blending a couple weeks ago, so I am having him make little books to practice.  I got the idea from LOE Foundations where their first "readers" have picture-less pages with a couple words that the child reads and then cuts and pastes the correct picture.  I use Google Image search to print out four recognizable CVC words, and then I cut a piece a paper in quarters, staple them into a book, and write one word on each page.  So today's book had the words pin, red, hat and nut and Spencer read each word, cut out each picture and glued it to that page. 

 

I love this approach because it is fun and colorful, doesn't require an overwhelming amount of reading, has each word on its own page so he doesn't need to worry about tracking across a line yet, gives him great fine motor cutting practice, and leaves him with a book "he made" that he can proudly read to anyone and everyone (which also gives him a lot more reading practice).

 

Eventually I am going to start writing 2-3 words on each page (wet cat, red pen, dog in box).  Once he can tackle those with little hesitation, then we are going to be ready for Bob Books, Progressive Phonics and starting OPGTR (obviously skipping the letter sound lessons and moving quickly through the beginning blending lessons).  We probably could jump to these right now, but I prefer to move more slowly to keep reading positive, fun and frustration-free.

 

Wendy


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#7 Hilltopmom

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Posted 10 November 2017 - 10:17 AM

Oh thank you Wendy! Great ideas.

Yeah, she’s not there yet. We can do other stuff for awhile :)
I’m sure I can come up with other fun stuff to do with Ziggy in the meantime.

#8 Mommyof1

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Posted 10 November 2017 - 12:06 PM

We use Blend Phonics with my DD recently turned 5 does better with this program. When we started she didn't like the two letter blends she didn't feel it was reading. We were using Phonics Pathways at the time. Blend Phonics had her sounding out cvc words. Once she was reading cvc she would happiy do the two letter blend for me.

#9 ReadingMama1214

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Posted 10 November 2017 - 01:21 PM

My DD started blending during AAR Pre. I felt she was moving too fast too so I decided we wouldn’t do the rest of AAR. We did Ordinary Parents Guide to Teaching Reading and supplemented with Progressive Phonics and BOB books. It worked and now at 6 she’s reading extremely well.

#10 MerryAtHope

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Posted 11 November 2017 - 01:48 AM

If you have some magnet letters or letter tiles, you can start to casually show her how to sound out words, and get Ziggy to help show her how to blend them etc... Keep working on oral blending types of exercises (where you say 3 sounds--not letter names-- like /k/ /a/ /t/ for cat etc...) and have her guess the word. Let her say sounds for you to blend too. My kids used to love to hear me try to blend their sound combinations (which didn't make real words but it still helps kids to hear how sounds blend together). You can also play the opposite game where she segments a word into sounds orally, or guesses the first or last sound in a word, or the "I'm going to market" or "I'm going to the zoo" games etc...  Here are some more phonological awareness activities if she needs more reinforcement. Have fun!  Pre-reading has all the skills a student needs to be ready for AAR 1, so it's not so much that there's a big jump as that some kids plateau and just need a bit more time for brain development before they are ready to move on.


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#11 Hilltopmom

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Posted 11 November 2017 - 07:46 AM

Thanks everyone!
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#12 Melissa in Australia

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Posted 13 November 2017 - 03:34 PM

We have about 9 more lessons to go in preAAR. We have started AAR1 we do it atadifferent part of the day and only do a very small bit. So a lesson takes us about2 weeks.we are also doing Reading Eggs. The twin's also read to me either a reading eggs book,a Bob Book, or a I See Sam book 2 times a day, mind you we are only into the very first of these books, but they are pretty excited to be 'reading'

Twins are about 18 months behind actual age in all areas
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#13 Tumbatoo

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Posted 15 November 2017 - 04:51 PM

What about Reading the Alphabet? It touches on letter sounds, but mostly focuses on phonetical awareness, sight words and other pre-reading skills. It's free online at thisreadingmama.com.

#14 ElizabethB

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Posted 16 November 2017 - 03:16 PM

Oral blending and modeling blending.

http://www.thephonic...ndingwords.html

#15 ExcitedMama

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Posted 18 November 2017 - 10:11 AM

It was a big jump for DS. We used Memoria Press First Start Reading and it was great. I bought the reacher's manual but you don't need it which makes the workbooks very gentle. The activities start off very gentle and DS really enjoyed it.