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Intentional belching


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#1 happysmileylady

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Posted 22 October 2017 - 05:57 PM

DD7 has learned how to belch/burp, on purpose.   She was diagnosed with ASD not quite a year ago, though her language delays have always been obvious and the diagnosis wasn't a surprise (though hard)  This intentional belching/burping is recent, like the last 2 weeks or so.  I don't know where she learned it, no one in my family does it, not even her most commonly visited cousins.  I *think* that she is doing it more about the sensation of the belch/burp in her throat vs gas in her belly. 

 

I want this to STOP.  Not just because it sounds gross (though it does, it sounds this close to puking.)  But also because she's doing it about every 5 to 10 minutes.  How this doesn't hurt her throat, I don't know.  But I am about done with it.

 

Ideas?



#2 OrganicJen

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Posted 22 October 2017 - 06:05 PM

My son has gone through various verbal tics and obnoxious sounds and the best solution we have found is giving him this necklace thing that is made to chew on. It's a sensory and compulsive thing for him and he couldn't just stop, he had to replace it with something else more socially appropriate and the necklace sensory chew thing worked best for him.
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#3 amo_mea_filiis.

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Posted 22 October 2017 - 07:18 PM

Are you reacting to it?

#4 OneStepAtATime

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Posted 22 October 2017 - 07:52 PM

Agreeing with OrganicJen, see if you can find another sensory thing she might can switch to that is more socially acceptable and less likely to cause potential physical issues.



#5 Storygirl

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Posted 22 October 2017 - 08:11 PM

Does she want to stop?

 

If she does not, it is going to be hard to get her to quit, and your best bet may be to ignore it and hope that she finds something else to amuse herself soon.

 

If it is more like a tic, where she has an impulse to do it but would be willing to stop, replacing it with another action may help.

 

DS13 has Tourettes, and to control his tics, he has been taught to think of a replacement action that is not as obtrusive. There is more to it than that, but that is the gist.

 

Now, there are certain noises and phrases of speech that he LIKES to make, and he will continue to do so, even if we ask him to stop. And if he ticcing and doesn't feel like controlling it at the moment, he is not willing to use his alternate action.

 

So there has to be some willingness to replace it with something else, or it is just a battle.

 

I realize how annoying this kind of thing is. Sorry.


Edited by Storygirl, 22 October 2017 - 08:16 PM.


#6 Storygirl

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Posted 22 October 2017 - 08:18 PM

It's worth considering whether it could be a tic. Sometimes tics seem voluntary, when they are really an uncontrolled impulse.



#7 OhElizabeth

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Posted 23 October 2017 - 10:36 AM

My ds' stims and repetitive behaviors rotate. They increase with stress. Sometimes it's boredom/waiting stress, sort of an overall nebulous thing. Anyways when it's that, upping interaction helps. More demands, more together, more compliance work, more interaction. It's calming to him and then the stim, which was for calming, chills.

So if my ds is humming a lot (his current thing), I'll do something with him for an hour and it chills. I have some handy, go to things for that. Could be school or just stuff to do together. (Mighteor, f&p readers, foot brushing, go for a run, play wii, etc)

Do you ever turn on music and dance? MFW has a nice cd for music appreciation we use. Hard to dance and belch and it's good sensory too. 😁

Edited by OhElizabeth, 23 October 2017 - 10:41 AM.


#8 happysmileylady

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Posted 23 October 2017 - 10:18 PM

Honestly, a tic or a stim didn’t occur to me. She has never presented with much of either.


Reaction...first we ignored it, then we started making her say excuse me. Then it got bad enough that as I said she sounded like she was going to puke. That’s when we started asking if she was doing it on purpose and she always answers that it is on purpose.

So we started telling her to stop. And in the immediate, it stops.

But after reading that it might be some sort of tic or stim, I tried to give her another option. I don’t have a chewy necklace for her (she could totally use one; it’s all on me that she doesn’t have one ) but I asked her why she does it. She said it’s itchy and scratched her neck.

So I encouraged her to rub her throat/neck when she felt the urge. And....that helps. It doesn’t stop it, but it does tone it down. The urge is somewhat calmed by the rubbing and any other belching is mouth closed.

I can dal with that. It’s not obnoxious, it’s quiet, it’s not Pukey sounding....good enough for me.

#9 Storygirl

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Posted 23 October 2017 - 10:36 PM

My son will always say that his tics are voluntary, even when it is obvious to us that they are out of his control. There are other things that he does repetitively that have not immediately registered with me as a tic, until I stop to think about it.

 

You can read a little about tics online. Many/most tics are preceded by an urge of some sort, just as you describe the throat itching.

 

The good news is that if the person can learn to identify that urge, they can sometimes learn to replace the tic with a more socially appropriate behavior in place of the tic. This takes some training; we worked with a specially trained psych to learn the technique. However, replacing the tic with another action does not make the tic go away; for many, it just means that they can learn to suppress or control it until they are in a private place.

 

I noticed that DS didn't do any vocal tics this week at his dentist appointment, and I asked him about it. He said he worked on suppressing them while in the chair. Sometimes he goes through a period where his tics are less prominent generally; sometimes they are triggered by stress; he does it more at home and less at school; sometimes an old tic fades and a new one starts. In other words, they wax and wane, which is typical with a tic disorder.

 

I'm not saying that your daughter has a tic disorder. Just that it is something for you to watch and consider. Make a note somewhere of the date around when it started. Knowing how long it has been happening is part of the diagnostic process, so if you ever decide to bring it up with a physician, it would be ideal to be able to say when it began.

 

 


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#10 JessReplanted

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Posted 28 October 2017 - 04:12 PM

This is just a NO in our house. Certain things really bother me, and this is one of them. I would give one or two verbal warnings and then send her somewhere (her room?) where no one has to listen to her burp.

And I do understand that this would not work for every kid or every family.

#11 geodob

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Posted 29 October 2017 - 07:24 AM

While she is belching on purpose.

An important question, is whether she is 'capturing the air on purpose?

 

As their is condition called; Aerophagia.   Where the 'upper esophageal sphincter (UES)' muscle, at the top of the esophagus.  Which normally allows food to enter the esophagus, but prevents air from entering it.  Has low tone, and is slow to close. Causing air to trapped in the esophagus.  

 

So that their is an important difference, between her intentionally capturing air, and then belching?

Or whether it is being trapped unintentionally, and she is belching to release it?  


Edited by geodob, 29 October 2017 - 07:39 AM.