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s/o negativity towards homeschooling from homeschoolers/others


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#1 Sadie

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Posted 21 October 2017 - 06:10 PM

Just wondering if it's just me, or if anyone else has noticed that these boards are becoming less and less positive about homeschooling ?

 

I haven't been here for many years, but it seems to me that when I was first here, these forums were very pro homeschooling, and now they are markedly less. 

 

This isn't a JAWM - feel free to say 'no Sadie, you are 100% imagining things', that's fine. 

 

I do find it interesting, being a philosophical homeschooler, but seeing (imagining?) this shift towards a sort of cynicism or even dislike of homeschooling....

 

Interested to hear what people think.


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#2 JudoMom

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Posted 21 October 2017 - 06:18 PM

I have noticed a shift.  There is a small handful of posters who I feel are anti-homeschooling, but overall I wouldn't say that the boards are negative towards homeschooling, but that they are less pro-homeschooling.  I understand that people and circumstances change and every family needs to do what is best for their family.  That said, this used to be a place where when people posted of their struggles, they were encouraged to keep at it and fight the good fight, where now I feel like there's a pretty good chance when people post of struggles, they'll be told they should consider brick and mortar school.


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#3 SparklyUnicorn

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Posted 21 October 2017 - 06:21 PM

I agree.  Although, I read the other sections less than I used to because I don't have that many questions anymore.  So maybe hanging out in this section is part of it?

 

 


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#4 Tibbie Dunbar

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Posted 21 October 2017 - 06:21 PM

In my state, the hsers of a certain kind are very powerful politically, and are helping to drive policy that affects the healthcare, education, and wellbeing of every child, not just hsers. They also actively encourage persecution and shunning of Hs'ed children who do not fit the mold, or whose families don't. We are also plagued by an ever growing reputation for outright educational neglect of many, many children, in the perception and experience of both public school teachers and administration AND the judicial system!

I don't tell anybody new to our lives that we homeschool. And I am beginning to work toward getting our state regulations changed from zero accountability to something more effective, that will not permit families to pull their kids from school with no plan and no skills, or to entirely neglect their daughters' educations for reasons of religious control.

Mine is not the only state in this fix. Those of us who have seen too much, been shunned and excluded, and are trying to protect our Hs'ed kids from the stigma of being assumed to be ignorant, religious bigots, are having serious problems gathering our warm fuzzies for hs'ing.

Which is a serious problem, because our public schools aren't very good, either...its just a grim time, Sadie.

Edited by Tibbie Dunbar, 21 October 2017 - 06:28 PM.

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#5 HomeAgain

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Posted 21 October 2017 - 06:23 PM

I think it goes in waves.

 

Summer - optimistic about the new year.  Everyone's getting organized and looking over new things, signing up for classes.  Newbies say hi and ask questions that give us all a time to reflect.

 

October- 6 weeks in.  Best laid plans are not working out as well.  Children aren't getting with the program. Those intended nature walks?  Well, those were already dropped.  Same with the fancy art program.

 

December - made it through the first half!  Yes!  A well deserved break!  Time to organize, get things set up for next semester!

 

February - we hit that 6 week mark again, now with the added bonus of being indoors too much.  That lesson plan is looking awfully thick still.

 

April - ALMOST THERE!  Time to start looking ahead to the new year.  Park days are giving us much needed exercise and rest.  We can do this!

 

May - DONE.  Or almost.  Everyone is getting cheerful again looking at the dwindling pages left.  We made it!

 

Summer......

 

:lol:


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#6 ILiveInFlipFlops

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Posted 21 October 2017 - 06:23 PM

I don't think I really see that overwhelmingly. I do know that some of our veterans have evolved from thinking HSing is almost always best toward feeling that they've seen a lot of abuse of the freedoms many homeschoolers have (in low-regulation or unregulated states), and so they may now lean toward more regulation and having less of an "anything goes" kind of attitude. (And based on some of the stories I've seen shared, I don't blame them.)

 

I also think the population of the board has evolved away from a decidedly Christian bent, which often brings a certain kind of perspective on homeschooling, toward a population that is homeschooling primarily for academic reasons, so some people maybe less inclined to view HSing as right for any and every family.

 

I hope I'm making sense! Trying to do too many things at once...

 

ETA: I personally don't think HSing IS right for every family, every time. Some days I really wonder if I did the right thing for my own two kids. But I try not to let myself go down that road *sigh* I'm not a philosophical homeschooler, and I don't believe in absolutes.


Edited by ILiveInFlipFlops, 21 October 2017 - 06:27 PM.

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#7 Tibbie Dunbar

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Posted 21 October 2017 - 06:23 PM

I have noticed a shift. There is a small handful of posters who I feel are anti-homeschooling, but overall I wouldn't say that the boards are negative towards homeschooling, but that they are less pro-homeschooling. I understand that people and circumstances change and every family needs to do what is best for their family. That said, this used to be a place where when people posted of their struggles, they were encouraged to keep at it and fight the good fight, where now I feel like there's a pretty good chance when people post of struggles, they'll be told they should consider brick and mortar school.


I think that's because more of the people posting their struggles are talking about very serious issues that seem to be made worse by their homeschooling attempt. :( I am always so relieved, yet surprised nowadays, when the problems are simply matters of inexperience or mild disorganization.
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#8 Barb_

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Posted 21 October 2017 - 06:24 PM

Just wondering if it's just me, or if anyone else has noticed that these boards are becoming less and less positive about homeschooling ?

I haven't been here for many years, but it seems to me that when I was first here, these forums were very pro homeschooling, and now they are markedly less.

This isn't a JAWM - feel free to say 'no Sadie, you are 100% imagining things', that's fine.

I do find it interesting, being a philosophical homeschooler, but seeing (imagining?) this shift towards a sort of cynicism or even dislike of homeschooling....

Interested to hear what people think.


A lot of us are older now and jaded. There are more retired and almost retired homeschooling moms on the boards as we've grown older with TWTM. Maybe the overall culture has changed. We seem to lack patience with self-importance--maybe we're a little more "get offa my lawn."
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#9 SparklyUnicorn

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Posted 21 October 2017 - 06:24 PM

You haven't emphasized the hell of February quite enough.  There is just something about February.  LOL

 

 


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#10 MegP

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Posted 21 October 2017 - 06:27 PM

In some areas, homeschooling=Christian fundamentalist, patriarchal, Michael Pearl, quiver full, isolationist, hyper sheltering, home churching or Family integrated church or IFB church, dresses only, "modest" clothing, exclusive, etc.

 

 

So I think there is a move away from that......or people don't want to be associated with that...


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#11 Sadie

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Posted 21 October 2017 - 06:28 PM

A lot of us are older now and jaded. There are more retired and almost retired homeschooling moms on the boards as we've grown older with TWTM. Maybe the overall culture has changed. We seem to lack patience with self-importance--maybe we're a little more "get offa my lawn."

 

Yeah, but see I am older :)  I only have two or three years to go. 

 

I definitely understand there are - as with any method of education - issues. 

 

But I am still pro homeschooling. Unapologetically. Even with the cons. 

 

So it's not just being older.


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#12 Sadie

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Posted 21 October 2017 - 06:29 PM

You haven't emphasized the hell of February quite enough.  There is just something about February.  LOL

 

Prob cause that's the start of our school year when we're all fresh and full of hope :)


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#13 Barb_

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Posted 21 October 2017 - 06:30 PM

Yeah, but see I am older :) I only have two or three years to go.

I definitely understand there are - as with any method of education - issues.

But I am still pro homeschooling. Unapologetically. Even with the cons.

So it's not just being older.

No, it isn't. I just wonder that as the average age on the boards increases, fatigue becomes a contributing factor.

Edited by Barb_, 21 October 2017 - 06:33 PM.

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#14 Barb_

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Posted 21 October 2017 - 06:32 PM

Also I am very pro-homeschooling, whn it works. But I am more willing to look at a homeschooling family or community and think, "wow that really isn't working."
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#15 ILiveInFlipFlops

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Posted 21 October 2017 - 06:32 PM

Yeah, but see I am older :)  I only have two or three years to go. 

 

I definitely understand there are - as with any method of education - issues. 

 

But I am still pro homeschooling. Unapologetically. Even with the cons. 

 

So it's not just being older.

 

I think you can be pro-homeschooling and still think it's not always the right fit for someone. I can think of a few people in my life whose kids would probably have been better off if they'd stayed in PS. If you're going to bring your kid home to homeschool, you should do more than plug them into a barely sufficient online program and then ignore them for the rest of the day, every day. KWIM? IMO, there is no way that that's a better situation than being in a good PS.


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#16 mom2scouts

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Posted 21 October 2017 - 06:33 PM

Yes, I've seen it too. I like to come to this forum when I'm struggling a bit with homeschooling, whether academics or something else, but lately it's just made me feel worse. I've always found it an excellent place for encouragement, curriculum recommendations, or ideas to meet other needs specific to homeschooling. There seems to be a number of long time posters who no longer homeschool for whatever reason and have an attitude that homeschooling wasn't that important, may not be worth the sacrifice, or public school is just as good. Maybe the increase in homeschoolers who aren't doing it because they think it's best, but because it's the only option has jaded some people. Those of us who are trying to do the best job with students who need homeschooling seem to be losing a place of encouragement. :mellow:


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#17 ILiveInFlipFlops

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Posted 21 October 2017 - 06:35 PM

No, it isn't. I just wonder that as the average age on the boards increases, fatigue becomes a contributing factor.

 

Fatigue, and having done it long enough to see the successes and failures, the methods and philosophies that paid off and those that didn't, the homeschoolers who hung on too long in spite of their burnout/their kids' issues and let it affect their kids' potential, etc.


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#18 Murphy101

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Posted 21 October 2017 - 06:36 PM

No, it isn’t just you to notice.

If people don’t want to home school anymore, then I don’t care. Their choice. I don’t get the idea of not home schooling bc of any home school group. I haven’t been in any groups in many years and have home schooled just fine without them. That’s one of the main points for home schooling, that we can all do what we think is best, mostly regardless of others’ opinions. I’ve met my share of people I think are jerks or bad parents or are Judgy McJudgy to me/my family in all kinds of education settings and from all kinds of back grounds, but I don’t blame the school type.

Eta: And I’m not some doe-eyed newbie. I’ve been at this for 17 years and have at least that much more to go.

Edited by Murphy101, 21 October 2017 - 06:37 PM.

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#19 Crimson Wife

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Posted 21 October 2017 - 06:36 PM

No, you're not imagining it. There has been a marked shift on this board away from a libertarian attitude (you do your thing and allow me to do mine) and towards embracing policing those whom the poster disagrees with.

 

I wouldn't belong to a support group that kicked out a family with a LGBT child, but I support the right of groups to decide for themselves their membership criteria.


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#20 Barb_

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Posted 21 October 2017 - 06:38 PM

Yes, I've seen it too. I like to come to this forum when I'm struggling a bit with homeschooling, whether academics or something else, but lately it's just made me feel worse. I've always found it an excellent place for encouragement, curriculum recommendations, or ideas to meet other needs specific to homeschooling. There seems to be a number of long time posters who no longer homeschool for whatever reason and have an attitude that homeschooling wasn't that important, may not be worth the sacrifice, or public school is just as good. Maybe the increase in homeschoolers who aren't doing it because they think it's best, but because it's the only option has jaded some people. Those of us who are trying to do the best job with students who need homeschooling seem to be losing a place of encouragement. :mellow:


Thanks for sharing that. I will try and remember it.

I thin you're right that homeschooling used to be a more all-encompassing commitment. It's human nature to believe whole-heartedly in something you have to sacrifice for, I guess. Maybe as homeschooling has gone more mainstream and people can sort of dip in and out, they are more likely to suggest alternative schooling than they used to be.

Each of my kids has tried school once. Every experiment has been an unmitigated disaster, but I started homeschooling because I already felt like a square peg in school. I probably raised a bunch of square peg offspring.
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#21 ILiveInFlipFlops

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Posted 21 October 2017 - 06:39 PM

No, you're not imagining it. There has been a marked shift on this board away from a libertarian attitude (you do your thing and allow me to do mine) and towards embracing policing those whom the poster disagrees with.

 

I wouldn't belong to a support group that kicked out a family with a LGBT child, but I support the right of groups to decide for themselves their membership criteria.

 

I support that too. But I'm damn sure going to be vocal in my opinion about it, because that's MY right as well. The door swings both ways.


Edited by ILiveInFlipFlops, 21 October 2017 - 06:40 PM.

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#22 Kinsa

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Posted 21 October 2017 - 06:39 PM

No, it's not your imagination. Nuff said.
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#23 Critterfixer

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Posted 21 October 2017 - 06:40 PM

I haven't noticed a pronounced negative bent. I think I'm seeing a lot of honesty about the challenges, about what the future holds, about logistics, about the difficulties of balancing life and homeschooling. That doesn't discourage me, though.


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#24 ILiveInFlipFlops

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Posted 21 October 2017 - 06:40 PM

Yes, I've seen it too. I like to come to this forum when I'm struggling a bit with homeschooling, whether academics or something else, but lately it's just made me feel worse. I've always found it an excellent place for encouragement, curriculum recommendations, or ideas to meet other needs specific to homeschooling. There seems to be a number of long time posters who no longer homeschool for whatever reason and have an attitude that homeschooling wasn't that important, may not be worth the sacrifice, or public school is just as good. Maybe the increase in homeschoolers who aren't doing it because they think it's best, but because it's the only option has jaded some people. Those of us who are trying to do the best job with students who need homeschooling seem to be losing a place of encouragement. :mellow:

 

:grouphug:  :grouphug:  :grouphug:


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#25 SparklyUnicorn

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Posted 21 October 2017 - 06:40 PM

Prob cause that's the start of our school year when we're all fresh and full of hope :)

 

I'm sure you have your version of February.  LOL


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#26 JudoMom

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Posted 21 October 2017 - 06:44 PM

I think that's because more of the people posting their struggles are talking about very serious issues that seem to be made worse by their homeschooling attempt. :( I am always so relieved, yet surprised nowadays, when the problems are simply matters of inexperience or mild disorganization.

 

Disclaimer:  I don't think everyone should homeschool.

I guess here on these boards (not in the general homeschool population and I'm genuinely sorry things are so crappy in your state), with the problems that are posted, I tend to see issues that would be there whether or not the kids were in school, and I tend to think homeschooling provides more opportunities to work on these issues.

I am more jaded than when I started back in the early 2000s, and I'm tired, and I've homeschooled a child who fought me tooth and nail for 3 years and he's thanked me for it (and I never posted about it here because I would've been told to put him in school).  And barring an abusive situation, I would still encourage any homeschooler who was struggling to keep at it.


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#27 ILiveInFlipFlops

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Posted 21 October 2017 - 06:45 PM

I'm curious: What exactly does it mean to be "pro-homeschooling"? Does it mean that homeschooling is always the only route, no matter what challenges may come along? That B&M school is never an option, even if it may serve the family better? That when someone comes along asking for support, public school cannot possibly ever offer a better option? Isn't that the same attitude we face from so many in the non-HSing population? 


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#28 Critterfixer

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Posted 21 October 2017 - 06:46 PM

Also, October is an autumn February for me.  I always call October the-grass-is-greener month. It's when I look over at what everybody else is doing to get a nice, green homeschooling paradise and bemoaning all my dandelions.

Usually around March, I remember that all those yellow flowers are beautiful in their own, weedy, wonderful way...


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#29 Sadie

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Posted 21 October 2017 - 06:48 PM

I'm sure you have your version of February.  LOL

 

August.


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#30 mom2scouts

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Posted 21 October 2017 - 06:48 PM

In some areas, homeschooling=Christian fundamentalist, patriarchal, Michael Pearl, quiver full, isolationist, hyper sheltering, home churching or Family integrated church or IFB church, dresses only, "modest" clothing, exclusive, etc.

 

 

So I think there is a move away from that......or people don't want to be associated with that...

 

My area in the Midwest is absolutely the opposite of this. There are a few Christian homeschool groups in my area, but they are often small or private groups and I don't encounter them much. Almost every homeschool group or event goes out of its way to make sure everyone knows the group is inclusive of all beliefs. Most people here worry more about the people who pull their children out because they don't like school rules, but don't really want to teach their children either or the hippy like unschoolers who don't require much of their kids.

 

I never even heard of Michael Pearl, quiver full, family integrated or IFB church, fundamentalist co-ops with strict statements of faith until I came to TWTM forums. None of the homeschoolers I knew before I started homeschooling fit into any of those categories!


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#31 fairfarmhand

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Posted 21 October 2017 - 06:54 PM

Also I am very pro-homeschooling, whn it works. But I am more willing to look at a homeschooling family or community and think, "wow that really isn't working."


Me too.

I’m pro homeschooling but I am anti “neglect your kids education and call it homeschooling.”

I think with dedicated parents, good relationships in the family and average kids with ordinary challenges homeschooling can be a wonderful thing.

Other situations I save my judgement for a case by case basis.

Homeschoooling has been wonderful for my family. My kids are in I great shape academically and socially. Even my kids raise an eyebrow at some homeschooling families.


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#32 Corraleno

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Posted 21 October 2017 - 06:56 PM

I've been here ~8 years, and I haven't noticed an increase in "anti-homeschooling" sentiment. However, I've spent most of that time on the high school board, where switching to B&M school, or doing some kind of hybrid, is much more common than on the elementary board. I haven't read the elementary or middle school boards in a long time, so if that's where others are seeing a shift in attitude, I would have missed that.
 
I think most of the time I've seen people here suggest that B&M school it's because a parent is really struggling and their kids are suffering for it. And often the theme of the thread is "I need to put my kids in school and I feel so guilty" and the other posters are just telling them to not feel guilty and do what they need to do, it doesn't have to be forever, etc. There are some people, in some circumstances, for whom B&M school really is the best solution, and telling them to "tough it out" will just make things worse. 
 
I love homeschooling and both of my kids will be homeschooled all the way through high school, but I don't think it's right for everyone and I think many kids are genuinely better off in school. It's not "anti-homeschooling" to tell parents that it's OK to do what's best for their family if homeschooling is just not the best fit at this moment in their lives (or for this particular kid, or in these economic circumstances, or whatever).
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#33 Murphy101

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Posted 21 October 2017 - 06:58 PM

Also I am very pro-homeschooling, whn it works. But I am more willing to look at a homeschooling family or community and think, "wow that really isn't working."


So? I do that for all kinds of things. Parenting. Public/private/home school. Marriages. Work places. What’s that got to do with me home schooling?

It’s one thing to say:

Home schooling sucks bc I’ve met sucky home schoolers.
I would disagree.

It’s another to say, “Yeahno, that’s not a good home schooling group or plan of action or marriage dynamic or whatever.”
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#34 FaithManor

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Posted 21 October 2017 - 07:12 PM

In my state, the hsers of a certain kind are very powerful politically, and are helping to drive policy that affects the healthcare, education, and wellbeing of every child, not just hsers. They also actively encourage persecution and shunning of Hs'ed children who do not fit the mold, or whose families don't. We are also plagued by an ever growing reputation for outright educational neglect of many, many children, in the perception and experience of both public school teachers and administration AND the judicial system!

I don't tell anybody new to our lives that we homeschool. And I am beginning to work toward getting our state regulations changed from zero accountability to something more effective, that will not permit families to pull their kids from school with no plan and no skills, or to entirely neglect their daughters' educations for reasons of religious control.

Mine is not the only state in this fix. Those of us who have seen too much, been shunned and excluded, and are trying to protect our Hs'ed kids from the stigma of being assumed to be ignorant, religious bigots, are having serious problems gathering our warm fuzzier for hs'ing.

Which is a serious problem, because our public schools aren't very good, either...its just a grim time, Sadie.


You have described my state!

I am glad my kids are going to college now. This is our last year of homeschooling and off to college. He has enough independent verification of his skills. My kids all did. This is becoming vital because ten years ago colleges here loved homeschooling, now they are beginning to get skeptical. If this keeps up, there will be open discrimination, and it is largely because the people claiming to homeschool but actually doing nothing, became so much bigger in numbers, so much more vocal. There is zero accountability, and they feel emboldened to loudly proclaim their intention of not doing much and then only to sixth or eighth grade. The homeschool statute which spells out that they are to be in a formalized education program that includes eight specific subject areas and until the age of graduating with the minimum requirements for high school diploma, eighteen, entrance to college, or some other recognized program like DE is entirely ignored.

When I began homeschooling, those I knew who were doing it were actually all about education, wanting what was best for their kids. They were serious regardless of the methodology they implemented. They did that magical thing, implement. But now this group is not the majority. The powers that be are taking notice.
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#35 ILiveInFlipFlops

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Posted 21 October 2017 - 07:15 PM

I think that's Barb's point--that HSing is no different from any other major life decision. Often it works beautifully, even if it's hard work, and everyone gets what they need. But sometimes it doesn't, and it doesn't make one anti-homeschooling to say that you've seen some families where it not going well and a change in approach might be beneficial.
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#36 Barb_

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Posted 21 October 2017 - 07:15 PM

So? I do that for all kinds of things. Parenting. Public/private/home school. Marriages. Work places. What’s that got to do with me home schooling?

It’s one thing to say:

Home schooling sucks bc I’ve met sucky home schoolers.
I would disagree.

It’s another to say, “Yeahno, that’s not a good home schooling group or plan of action or marriage dynamic or whatever.”


I didn't make that jump. I think in the earlier years I was so enthusiastic that I believed in most cases kids were better off homeschooling than not. In the earlier days I think in general people were more committed too. It seems like people are a lot more likely to homeschool to escape a bad situation when their hearts aren't necessarily in it. More kids are asking to be homeschooled and parents are left scrambling to figure it out. I would never say homeschooling in general sucks because I don't believe that.
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#37 Barb_

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Posted 21 October 2017 - 07:18 PM

I think that's Barb's point--that HSing is no different from any other major life decision. Often it works beautifully, even if it's hard work, and everyone gets what they need. But sometimes it doesn't, and it doesn't make one anti-homeschooling to say that you've seen some families where it not going well and a change in approach might be beneficial.


Yes, and I think in some cases homeschooling is a last ditch effort that isn't understood to be the major life decision that it is.
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#38 HomeAgain

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Posted 21 October 2017 - 07:22 PM

I didn't make that jump. I think in the earlier years I was so enthusiastic that I believed in most cases kids were better off homeschooling than not. In the earlier days I think in general people were more committed too. It seems like people are a lot more likely to homeschool to escape a bad situation when their hearts aren't necessarily in it. More kids are asking to be homeschooled and parents are left scrambling to figure it out. I would never say homeschooling in general sucks because I don't believe that.

 

I think partly the 'easy-free' idea is gaining ground, too.  Parents looking for something quick to jump into, and free, and easy to implement. When the reality turns out not be be exactly so, they are discouraged.

 

I'm really tired so I'm not sure if that's a coherent thought.  But it was something that came to mind.  People are wanting to hs their kids without realizing how very full it can be in their lives and how it takes preparation and learning as they go.  When 'easy-free' commercials are on tv and in magazines, the outcome can be people not prepared for the undertaking.

 

 

I try to warn people, I do.  I put up weekly pictures of work, 10-20 at a time so my friends know this isn't plopping a kid down in front of a computer or a book.  It's time consuming.


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#39 Plum Crazy

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Posted 21 October 2017 - 07:22 PM

I think school choice has had a major impact on everything education-related, be it ps, charter, homeschooling and all of the categories between. We have many parents who are making decisions about their child's education that are acting more emotionally than thoughtfully. Options can make things more complicated. As said in another thread about old schooling, many new homeschoolers are jumping in without much preparation and souring as a result. I can say the same about charter schools. 

 

Ps-bashing, charter-bashing, homeschool-bashing all seem to me to be at an all-time high. It could be the atmosphere. I don't think anyone really feels like their group has their back. Is anyone happy with DeVos? I'm relieved my state couldn't get vouchers together even though I would have benefited enormously. Putting yourself in charge of your child's education is something that needs to be done with thought and planning. 

 

I always caution people when they are considering online school. I do the same with homeschool. I'm still pro-school choice. I just wish people would take it a little more seriously. This could all be problems in my area though. 

 
sorry kinda rambly

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#40 wintermom

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Posted 21 October 2017 - 07:35 PM

Actually, I have noticed a pro-best-for-individual-child and look at all possible educational options more on this forum than other homeschool forums and organizations I've come across. Sometimes there is a push to "homeschool at all costs" and an anti-building school attitude that can be alienating and unhelpful.  I know so many families that have some children in schools, some homeschooling and some doing a hybrid education. It's great that there are so many options in order to serve individual students best.

 

I wrote an article for my local homeschool organization (religious based) that I thought wouldn't even make it to print. Strike 1, it didn't have a single bible quote in it. Strike 2, it included going through a public school board in order to do an internship. It was eventually included in the newsletter, and I received quite a lot of positive feedback on it. It was pretty much an anomaly, though. Building schools and school boards are never mentioned in the newsletter, in spite of the fact that our local school board provides a lot of support and opportunities to homeschoolers. 


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#41 Carrie12345

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Posted 21 October 2017 - 07:44 PM

10 years in and I still consider myself very pro-homeschooling... for those who want to homeschool. But I'm finding more and more people who just don't want to use public schools, which isn't always the same thing.

I'm no longer interested in "What's the best math curriculum for a 5th grader" conversations because so few askers want to contemplate the pros and cons for their specific kids. Telling them what I use for MY 5th grader is meaningless.

<------ grumpy old fart
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#42 kiana

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Posted 21 October 2017 - 07:44 PM

Actually, I have noticed a pro-best-for-individual-child and look at all possible educational options more on this forum than other homeschool forums and organizations I've come across. Sometimes there is a push to "homeschool at all costs" and an anti-building school attitude that can be alienating and unhelpful.  I know so many families that have some children in schools, some homeschooling and some doing a hybrid education. It's great that there are so many options in order to serve individual students best.

 

I honestly think that this place in particular is one of the most balanced as far as considering what's best for the specific child in question, including not treating all children in the same family the same. 


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#43 amy g.

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Posted 21 October 2017 - 07:45 PM

I've been on these boards for a long time. I have noticed a shift in the attitude towards homeschooling here, but I'm not sure it is a bad thing.

Years ago, there was sometimes the assertion that the worst a homeschooler could do was better than the best public schools could do. I just don't think that is true.

Homeschooling well takes time, patience, versatility, endurance, commitment and so much more. Not everyone wants to spend all of the energy it takes. Not everyone has all of the energy it requires.

So, no, I don't believe everyone should homeschool.

At the same time, I've never been a take it year by year person. I am personally committed to homeschooling all of my children all of the way through.

If my kids choose to put their own kids in public school, I will do everything possible to be supportive and involved. I have seen kids be very well served by their PS education so long as the parents are present and aware.

But I am also saving all of our HS books in case I have an opportunity to homeschool future grandchildren too.

For me, the longer I homeschool the less I believe it is best for every family and the more I'm convinced that it is best for my family.
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#44 Arctic Mama

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Posted 21 October 2017 - 07:50 PM

Yes. I’ve noticed. There is a lot of criticism of those who homeschool for religious reasons too, as though they’re all a bunch of homeschool gestapo bigots by association.

Some bad apples exist, but it’s definitely not the whole lot.
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#45 Rosie_0801

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Posted 21 October 2017 - 07:52 PM

I think partly the 'easy-free' idea is gaining ground, too.  Parents looking for something quick to jump into, and free, and easy to implement. When the reality turns out not be be exactly so, they are discouraged.

 

I'm really tired so I'm not sure if that's a coherent thought.  But it was something that came to mind.  People are wanting to hs their kids without realizing how very full it can be in their lives and how it takes preparation and learning as they go.  When 'easy-free' commercials are on tv and in magazines, the outcome can be people not prepared for the undertaking.

 

 

From what I've seen, not necessarily on this board, this combines with parents comparing themselves to a lower standard than I heard from eavesdropping on the old timers on this board..

 

Homeschooling is going to look different if the aim is to do better than the local schools than it will if the aim is for the kids to work at the upper end of their ability level.

 

My dd's school works a year behind where we were studying in maths at the end of last year, and my dd has/had dyscalculia. This weekend she asked me for maths work. That's not what you expect from a kid who hasn't seen her mother in three weeks, but she's that disgusted with her education.



#46 Sadie

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Posted 21 October 2017 - 07:53 PM

Thanks ladies. Super interesting to hear everyone's thoughts. 

 

(Glad it's not all in my head though :))

 

~

 

I suppose I can add my own perspective now! As a philosophical homeschooler who has major issues with institutional schooling even when a school is 'good' (even though my middle dd goes to school - hey, maybe because she goes to school!) I definitely would now hestitate to discuss homeschooling challenges on this board. 

 

It feels like the criteria for having one's committment to homeschooling unchallenged is adopting institutional values. 

 

Anyway, just my 2c on my own thread :)

 

 


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#47 Kinsa

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Posted 21 October 2017 - 07:54 PM

Yes. I’ve noticed. There is a lot of criticism of those who homeschool for religious reasons too, as though they’re all a bunch of homeschool gestapo bigots by association.

Some bad apples exist, but it’s definitely not the whole lot.


Yes, that gets old. Because, hello, some of us ARE those "evil" evangelical protestant Christian homeschoolers. The travesty of it!

Whatever. I don't have the gumption to fight it tonight. I took 21 kids over 100 miles away today on a full day outdoor field trip while nursing a migraine. I'm fried.
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#48 Arctic Mama

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Posted 21 October 2017 - 07:56 PM

My area in the Midwest is absolutely the opposite of this. There are a few Christian homeschool groups in my area, but they are often small or private groups and I don't encounter them much. Almost every homeschool group or event goes out of its way to make sure everyone knows the group is inclusive of all beliefs. Most people here worry more about the people who pull their children out because they don't like school rules, but don't really want to teach their children either or the hippy like unschoolers who don't require much of their kids.

I never even heard of Michael Pearl, quiver full, family integrated or IFB church, fundamentalist co-ops with strict statements of faith until I came to TWTM forums. None of the homeschoolers I knew before I started homeschooling fit into any of those categories!


I didn’t really hear about it California, Alaska, OR Ohio. It must just be creepy enclaves or I meet really great people. I know homeschoolers from across the religious and ideological and political spectrum, and hate the lumped-in-with-worst-outcomes thing that can tend to happen whenever this is discussed online.

It’s akin to looking at a failing school district and pronouncing all schools as failures. Or that they all need even more red tape to prevent the cruddy ones, even if the issues had zero to do with regs.

I come on here because it’s still a useful resource, but it’s definitely become a more negative enclave for genera homeschool and family life encouragement even in the years since I have been on.
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#49 Arctic Mama

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Posted 21 October 2017 - 07:57 PM

Yes, that gets old. Because, hello, some of us ARE those "evil" evangelical protestant Christian homeschoolers. The travesty of it!

Whatever. I don't have the gumption to fight it tonight. I took 21 kids over 100 miles away today on a full day outdoor field trip while nursing a migraine. I'm fried.


That sounds exhausting just reading it! I hope your migraine improves :grouphug:

I’m one of those homeschoolers too, and I still don’t fit the stereotype. Oh well.
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#50 Sadie

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Posted 21 October 2017 - 08:01 PM

Yes. I’ve noticed. There is a lot of criticism of those who homeschool for religious reasons too, as though they’re all a bunch of homeschool gestapo bigots by association.

Some bad apples exist, but it’s definitely not the whole lot.

 

Obviously I don't homeschool for religious reasons, but I'd say my category of reasons - philosophical and political - aligns more with religious homeschoolers than they do with those who homeschool for academic reasons. 

 

Academics, while important, is second on my list. (And I've graduated a homeschooled (CM) K-10 student who went straight on to uni and has a history of HD's, so I am entirely comfortable with my approach to academics. I unschooled a K-6er who had zero trouble with academically blitzing her schooled high school years too! I did something right.)


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