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hair removal ideas for my daughter?


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#1 Rosika

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Posted 21 October 2017 - 01:35 PM

We are Eastern European and on the hairier side of things. I don't shave my armpits or my legs unless someone in the family is celebrating a sacrament.  :D When I do, I prefer to get waxed over shaving. 

 

My daughter is in 7th grade. When her hair became obvious, I told her that the norm is to shave (or wax, or whatever to remove armpit and leg hair), and that it was "expected" in the area we're currently living. We discussed various options, including my own choice to remain "natural" against social convention. She's more of a personality who wishes to fit in, rather than to stand out. 

 

She didn't want to shave, questioned why it was expected of women but not men, and decided to leave her hair as it was. I've brought it up a few times, and she's more interested in hair removal but not quite ready to commit to it. 

 

The idea of a razor makes her hesitate, but so far that's what I'm planning to use. When she saw what was involved with sugar or wax, she balked in horror. I was told by two electrolysis offices that because she's young it may not be effective long-term ... something about hormones/age? I don't want to expose her to the harsh chemicals like Nair, but I might as a last resort. 

 

Any suggestions or advice for me RE: removing armpit and leg hair for her, when she's ready?

 

Eventually we'll need to consider facial hair. Any experiences with threading? Or with kids doing it? Do they thread armpits? 

 

:confused:



#2 displace

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Posted 21 October 2017 - 01:51 PM

Nair is a chemical hair remover. Once the bulk of the hair is removed, I'd probably get her a good electric razor. Electric razors for women can't usually handle much hair, but once it's shorter they do ok. But, maybe they work better now. I haven't used one in decades.

Razors can cut, of course, but don't have a big learning curve, except to not go over the skin more than once, and to cut in the direction of the hair to decrease bumps.
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#3 SKL

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Posted 21 October 2017 - 01:55 PM

My eldest started shaving with a regular razor at age 9 or 10.  I did it for her the first few times. Then she decided she didn't want to wait around for me and started doing it herself.  No problems.

 

She asked about facial hair when she was 10, and this is the product she uses.  Again, no problems.

 

https://smile.amazon...ge?ie=UTF8&th=1


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#4 matrips

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Posted 21 October 2017 - 02:02 PM

We shave; my Ds is 12 and started about a year ago due to a lot of body odor coming from under her arms. Deodorant didn’t cut it for her; we live in a hot, humid area. I gave her a bunch of choices and she chose shaving. These are razors I love and highly recommend! So soft, gentle and smooth!

https://www.target.c...wE&gclsrc=aw.ds

I’ve never been nicked. I tried a cheaper one again about a year ago and yuck- what a painful difference. I started Dd on the same razor and she never had an issue. If the amount of hair the first time is too much, it may be too hard to rinse out the razor well. We had to toss the first blade after her first time using. Now she just shaves every couple days and it’s super quick and easy.
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#5 alisoncooks

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Posted 21 October 2017 - 02:12 PM

DD11 shaves regularly. She started with an electric razor, since she was afraid of accidentally nicking herself with a razor blade. We found that electric works best when the hair is already short (it took SEVERAL passes over her legs to get them shaved the first time). In retrospect, and what I'll probably do for younger DD, is remove all the hair with Nair and then upkeep with the electric razor.

FWIW, DD11 does use a regular razor in the shower now. I had to help her the first few times, but she's completely independent now.
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#6 Corraleno

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Posted 21 October 2017 - 02:40 PM

DD, DS, and I all use this electric razor. DS originally had a much more expensive men's razor, but he forgot it once when we were traveling and after he borrowed mine he said he liked it much better and it gave a closer shave, so now we have 3 of them. I'm blonde and not very hairy so I only shave in the summer, first with a regular razor and then I use the electric one every few days for maintenance. DD has black hair and does gymnastics so she uses the electric razor year round.


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#7 bibiche

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Posted 21 October 2017 - 02:40 PM

I recommend an epilator. You avoid chemicals and cuts, and the hair grows back more slowly since it is being removed at the roots.

 

For the face, she could use one of those little electric ear/nose hair removers or a brow and face razor (the kind that is sort of serrated so it doesn't cut the skin - I get mine in the Japanese store).


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#8 Rosika

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Posted 21 October 2017 - 06:57 PM

Thank you so much! I especially appreciate the specific product recommendations, those are a huge help. 

 

I was hoping to avoid NAIR, but maybe that's just where we need to start. From what you all are saying, I don't think she could start with an electric razor, but she could probably move to that after a first go-through with the Nair. I didn't know they made electric razors for women. I completely forgot they were an option even for men. I'm so glad I asked. 

 

I like the idea of the epilator. I wonder if she'd be open to trying it. She's a chicken when it comes to pain, whether it's real or just perceived!

 

She likes the idea of the Olay face cream, so we're going to bookmark that for when the time comes. 

 

:hurray: This place is amazing. 



#9 nixpix5

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Posted 21 October 2017 - 08:31 PM

I fully recommend sugaring. Less painful than waxing and leaves amazing smooth skin. If you start sugaring young you have less hair growing back in over time. It comes back thinner and more sparse.

Edited by nixpix5, 21 October 2017 - 08:32 PM.

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#10 katilac

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Posted 21 October 2017 - 10:39 PM

I recommend an epilator.  

 

Have they vastly improved over the years, or do they still cause agonizing pain, lol? 

 

If you don't find them painful, do you rate your body hair fine/medium/thick as hell? 


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#11 Tasha

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Posted 21 October 2017 - 11:08 PM

Have they vastly improved over the years, or do they still cause agonizing pain, lol?

If you don't find them painful, do you rate your body hair fine/medium/thick as hell?


I think they have improved quite a bit, but they still hurt! You do get used to it, but I’m not sure a younger child would be willing to use one. I’ve been using an epilator for awhile now and I still have to brace myself before each use. (I have “thick as hell hair” 😉 and lots of it.)
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#12 RootAnn

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Posted 21 October 2017 - 11:09 PM

If she can't handle pain,she might not be able to get over the initial curve for an epilator. I wish I would have started with one because they are so easy and it lasts so much longer. But, the first time and if you've gone awhile (a month?) between sessions, youch!

I have one kid who chooses to shave and one who prefers to epilate. My #3 girl is currently in the break-in stages for the epilator. Everyday, she has me do a small (new) portion of each leg. If you can't take pain, you won't get through to the easier maintenance stage.

I almost forgot - I have crazy thick hair. Two dds have crazy thick hair (one dark colored, one light) and one has thin, light-colored hair.

Good luck!

Edited by RootAnn, 21 October 2017 - 11:12 PM.

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#13 reefgazer

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Posted 22 October 2017 - 12:22 AM

Honestly, a razor is cheap, quick, safe, and simple.  If and when she wants her hair removed, she'll reach for the razor without further prodding from anyone, so I would just make the razors available and not say anther word or give it another thought.


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#14 J-rap

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Posted 22 October 2017 - 02:37 AM

We're not Eastern Europe, but we're a hairy family!

 

My dd's have found that a product like Nair is good for taking off the worst of it, and then a shave with a simple razor and soap will take off the rest.  It's really pretty easy.  They probably began shaving around 7th grade.

 

I don't shave all the time.  We have winter or at least cold weather here from November through May, and during that time, I often don't shave at all.  I've never been the type of mom who says you have to do this.  Several of my dd's do the same now, but what that means is that the first shave of the spring takes a lot of time!  There's a lot of hair there!  (That's why Nair.)

 

For facial hair, I've gotten each of my dd's a good pair of tweezers.  (We like Tweezerman.)  Also, facial hair bleach.  For one of my dd's, we're actually looking into laser hair removal now.  We do have PCOS in the family, and I think parts of the facial hair factor.  For my dd that has it the worst, she take a prescription of spironolactone, which helps a lot with the facial hair.


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#15 Laura Corin

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Posted 22 October 2017 - 03:23 AM

I have pale skin and abundant dark hair. I use a generic Nair like product for my upper lip, and I shave my legs. I don't do my armpits.
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#16 Zinnia

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Posted 22 October 2017 - 09:42 AM

I recommend an epilator. You avoid chemicals and cuts, and the hair grows back more slowly since it is being removed at the roots.


I tried one of these once around 15.

I still remember the pain!! Not for the faint of heart. Or wimpy in pain. :D
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#17 Zinnia

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Posted 22 October 2017 - 09:45 AM

I shave legs and armpits, and I get my brows and lip threaded. I should get my entire face threaded (lots of fine hair showing up on my lower face in my 40s), but again, pain. So I just tweeze anything dark.

#18 mathnerd

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Posted 22 October 2017 - 01:28 PM

I recommend an epilator. 

I have tried epilators and have been in tears many times due to the pain. I have 2 epilators, but never use them anymore because it is not worth it. And I am a person with high pain tolerance usually.



#19 Katy

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Posted 22 October 2017 - 01:49 PM

I also love epilators.  The first time is the worst because the root of the hair is thickest.  It's still less pain than hot wax, and she'll be able to spread it out or go as fast as she wants to get it over with.  If she keeps up and uses it every 2-3 weeks, the roots of the hairs will NEVER be that thick again and you don't have to let the hair grow as long as you do with wax or sugaring.

 

Just warn her that the first time is agonizing but after that it will get easier and easier until it barely hurts.  If she goes a year without using it, it's agony again.



#20 bibiche

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Posted 22 October 2017 - 02:00 PM

Have they vastly improved over the years, or do they still cause agonizing pain, lol? 

 

If you don't find them painful, do you rate your body hair fine/medium/thick as hell? 

 

I don't find it painful at all anymore. When I first used an epilator it was a little painful, but nothing compared to waxing. Waxing pulls the skin as well as the hair, while an epilator pulls only the hair.  I guess i have medium hair, but after many years of using an epilator there is much less of it and it is much finer.


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#21 SKL

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Posted 22 October 2017 - 02:04 PM

Speaking of epilators - they are a no-go if you get ingrown hairs.  I found this out the hard way.  After all the pain of forcing myself to use one initially, I got the joy of dealing with countless ingrown hairs as they grew back under the skin.  No thank you.  I don't recommend them.