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Chiropractor, PT, or something else??


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#1 Joker

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Posted 17 October 2017 - 11:22 PM

Dh has had lower back issues off and on for the past 20 years. It's usually once a year. Last year was the worst and he could barely walk for more than a week. He took a lot of pills, slept a lot, and was better after a few weeks.

 

He just tweaked it again. We went to a chiropractor since doctors just want to give him pills that don't seem to do very much. The chiro seemed to know what they were talking about but I am just unsure. Their explanation of his hips being out of alignment and that causing knee pain when he runs made a lot of sense.

 

Dh did see a chiropractor years ago after falling on ice and was feeling completely normal after one adjustment. That was the last time we saw one. 

 

I've spent time searching online tonight and I am more unsure than ever. We've never tried a physical therapist so I'm wondering if we should do that or some type of orthopedist. Mostly, I just don't know if chiropractors are good or not. I'm worried about messing him up worse than he already is.

 

He's not overweight (doctors usually want him to gain about five pounds when they see him). No health issues at all and all yearly physicals and blood work are great. His back just messes with him at least once a year. 



#2 Jean in Newcastle

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Posted 17 October 2017 - 11:27 PM

I love my chiropractor. I would only go to PT after the chiropractor treated the misalignment.


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#3 Rosie_0801

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Posted 17 October 2017 - 11:55 PM

What Jean said. 

A decent chiropractor will ask for updated X-rays before they even touch him. They should be pointing to those X-rays while giving their explanation, not just expecting you to trust them because they are the expert. It is typical with a Chiro to feel better for the first few appointments, then worse as the body has to learn to hold itself and move in a different way, then better again once it is used to the new posture. With a chronic problem, they might want to see him twice a week for the first few weeks too. Outlining a plan like that doesn't automatically mean they are rip off merchants.

 

Chiropractors, like everyone else, can be good or bad. Ask around for a recommendation.



#4 Ellie

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Posted 17 October 2017 - 11:56 PM

^^^ WSS.



#5 Joker

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Posted 17 October 2017 - 11:59 PM

They took x-rays today and said they would go over them with us on Thursday. They even said we could have copies of we brought a CD with us.

#6 OrganicJen

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Posted 18 October 2017 - 12:03 AM

I used to go to a chiropractor for neck and back pain but then went to a PT and for me the PT ended up helping me a lot more and longer term. So for my particular back and neck issues the PT was much more helpful and I didn't need to keep going back.

Edited by OrganicJen, 18 October 2017 - 12:03 AM.


#7 abacus2

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Posted 18 October 2017 - 01:18 AM

You can also consider a DO. They are medical doctors who are also trained in Chiropractic manipulation. Like anything else, there are good and bad chiropractors. They have a tendency to delve into areas outside their expertise. I am pretty trusting of things they tell me about my spine, neck, and possible treatments. I am much more skeptical of what they say about nutrition, vaccination, supplements, RX meds, etc.


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#8 magnificent_baby

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Posted 18 October 2017 - 06:41 AM

I would go to an orthopedic surgeon in order to get an order for an MRI to actually see whats wrong and make sure there's nothing urgent. They can also write a script for PT.

 

This happens to DH as well 1-2 times per year. He was able to overcome it with ibuprofen, physical therapy (who also does massage) and muscle relaxants. He did get a steroid injection as well. The ortho can guide the treatment, and it doesn't always mean surgery. This also establishes care so that treatment can be faster when it flares up again. 

 

I would ask around and see who your friends recommend. I am not against chiropractors at all, but I would want some imaging before going that route long term. My grandpa was treated by one for years for headaches when it actually ended up being a benign brain tumor. 



#9 MBM

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Posted 18 October 2017 - 10:39 AM

I used a pulsed electromagnetic field device (PEMF) several years ago for my long-term lower back pain that was waking me in the middle of the night and bothering me throughout the day. It took a few weeks but worked like a charm. I also used it on my right knee when I tore the cartilage there. 

 

I have the Almag and Sota devices and am going to buy a mat hopefully this year to see if I can increase the length of my telomeres. The Sota would work well for lower back pain.

 

https://www.drpawluk...agnetic-pulser/

 

PEMF is very good for many problems. It is finally being studied here in the US but has been used in Europe and Russia for much longer.

 

Another idea for your husband is to read Pete Ergoscue's book about pain. Some areas have Ergoscue clinics to help people align themselves in healthier ways.



#10 J-rap

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Posted 18 October 2017 - 11:09 AM

I and my family members have had the best results with PT's.  But it's not a quick fix.  At first it feels like nothing is changing and you're about to give up.  Keep going.


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#11 Bluegoat

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Posted 18 October 2017 - 12:35 PM

I'd say a PT too.  A chiropractor might give some short term relief, but if there is a problem you need to address the source.



#12 Mary in VA

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Posted 18 October 2017 - 03:44 PM

You can also consider a DO. They are medical doctors who are also trained in Chiropractic manipulation. Like anything else, there are good and bad chiropractors. They have a tendency to delve into areas outside their expertise. I am pretty trusting of things they tell me about my spine, neck, and possible treatments. I am much more skeptical of what they say about nutrition, vaccination, supplements, RX meds, etc.

DOs do not do chiropractic manipulation, they do osteopathic manual manipulation (OMM) and it is very different. My son-in-law is currently a first year student in a DO school.  DOs get all the same training as medical doctors and training in OMM.  They can go to residencies in all the same specialities as MDs.

 

Here is a little explanation about OMM 

The Treatment Techniques

Chiropractors employ a wider range of techniques for manipulating the spine, whereas osteopaths employ a wider range of techniques overall. Apart from manipulation, osteopaths use other techniques such as stretching, pressure and mobilization. Osteopaths are also trained in cranial osteopathy or cranio sacral therapy, which involve very subtle and gentle adjustments without any “clicking” of the joints. These techniques are seldom used by chiropractors. Another difference is that osteopaths do not “click back” a joint the way chiropractors do.

 

Mary


Edited by Mary in VA, 18 October 2017 - 04:07 PM.