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Filling out paper work for initial eval: How do I "place" dd? *Update in #8: Diagnoses received*


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#1 Mama Anna

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Posted 14 October 2017 - 01:08 PM

I'm starting a new thread on this just in case others are in the same place.

 

I received the packet of stuff I'm supposed to fill out and send back in before 8-year-old dd's initial eval.  (In late December.  <sigh>)  They want to know how she's doing in various school subjects compared to her grade.  How do I judge that?

 

We work on all the subjects that they ask about, so that part is fine.  However, I don't have a standard of comparison for her; her sisters were beyond where she is now when they were her age, but they're not "average."  My sense is that she's at or near grade level in everything but handwriting stamina - because she has continual and generally intense one-on-one support and review, etc, in her hs experience.  If she didn't have it, I'm dead certain she wouldn't be where she is in spite of the fact that (I think) she's 2e.

 

Do I try to explain this in the margin of the paperwork?

Do I try to research and compare her to some internet-discovered grade norm?

Do I note down my sense of where she is due to my personal expectations for subjects and abilities?  

 

For those of you who have BTDT, what should I do?

 

TIA!

Mama Anna

 


Edited by Mama Anna, 14 February 2018 - 09:35 AM.


#2 Lecka

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Posted 14 October 2017 - 03:41 PM

My thought is, definitely note she had "extensive one-on-one tutoring and extensive supports including...."
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#3 Crimson Wife

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Posted 14 October 2017 - 07:29 PM

Depending on your state ed code, she won't qualify for IEP services unless you can demonstrate that she's at least 2 grades behind in a particular area. So I would encourage to be as "doom and gloom" as you can legitimately make a claim to be. Obviously don't flat-out lie, but put the most negative spin on the truth as you possibly can.



#4 Julie of KY

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Posted 14 October 2017 - 08:26 PM

On paper, I only give generalities. Above average in this subject. Struggles, but keeping up in x. Below grade level in y and z. I orally talk through each subject with an elevator, but I don't try to compare her to what grade she is. I list out specific concerns. I think it is much harder to categorize kids who are homeschooling as we can go at their pace, work over summers, accommodate as needed, etc. 

 

I'm assuming any "demonstration" of being behind in grade levels is going to be demonstrated by testing rather than by a parent saying that the child is behind.

 

 


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#5 Storygirl

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Posted 15 October 2017 - 03:02 PM

I agree that they will ultimately determine her ability through the testing. But to show that she needs the testing, you need to indicate your areas of concern by highlighting all of the struggles, as Crimson mentioned. The school has to find reason to believe there may be a disability, before they will agree to testing.

 

If this is a form you are filling out, I would not try to write in the margins. Instead, say "see attached paper," and then attach an additional document, on which you have typed out a description of her struggles, any curriculum that you use and the level that she is using, and what you do to accommodate and modify her work. Indicate that the work she is able to produce does not match her intellectual ability. You can substantiate this by saying that she shows much greater understanding when allowed to do her work orally instead of writing it down, since handwriting is the particular area of struggle. You can say that she has had more struggle than peers (which is true, because in her case her peers have been her siblings).

 

Specific Learning Disability in written expression covers two areas -- the motor planning and physical act of writing, and the ability to get thoughts onto paper. If you see problems in both of those areas, be sure to mention both.

 

If she is working at or above grade level in certain subjects, you can indicate that as well, but if there are specific areas where she struggles, mention them. For example, a student may be great at understanding math concepts but also struggle with memorizing math facts. My son has both strengths and weaknesses in the area of writing. He can write a creative story and structure it well, but ask him to write an academic essay, and he needs a huge amount of scaffolding. He is not 2e, but I imagine those wonky discrepancies may be common in a 2e kid, so if you see them, be sure to make notes.

 

 


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#6 Mama Anna

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Posted 16 October 2017 - 08:05 AM

If this is a form you are filling out, I would not try to write in the margins. Instead, say "see attached paper," and then attach an additional document, on which you have typed out a description of her struggles, any curriculum that you use and the level that she is using, and what you do to accommodate and modify her work. Indicate that the work she is able to produce does not match her intellectual ability. You can substantiate this by saying that she shows much greater understanding when allowed to do her work orally instead of writing it down, since handwriting is the particular area of struggle. You can say that she has had more struggle than peers (which is true, because in her case her peers have been her siblings).

 

Specific Learning Disability in written expression covers two areas -- the motor planning and physical act of writing, and the ability to get thoughts onto paper. If you see problems in both of those areas, be sure to mention both.

 

If she is working at or above grade level in certain subjects, you can indicate that as well, but if there are specific areas where she struggles, mention them. For example, a student may be great at understanding math concepts but also struggle with memorizing math facts. 

 

Thanks!  I see that the bolded text above does need to be my chief goal.  I have already written up a few pages that outline my concerns in general and I was thinking it would be a good idea to send a copy them in with the paperwork.  If I can tweak things well enough to communicate what the evaluator needs to know . . . (It may help that it's a neuro-psych instead of public school personnel.)

 

Thanks to everyone who chimed in - I really appreciate the knowledge base of these forums!!

 

Mama Anna



#7 Crimson Wife

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Posted 16 October 2017 - 11:31 AM

If you suspect dysgraphia, Understood.org has a good list of "red flags" in elementary students.


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#8 Mama Anna

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Posted 14 February 2018 - 10:37 AM

We were finally able to get through the evaluation process and get diagnoses!  (So happy!)

 

Dd8 is 2e: Gifted, with HFA and ADHD (Combined Type).

 

These agree with what I've been finding in my own research, so I think they are accurate.  We should soon be receiving a call for an intake appointment with a therapist.

 

I find myself reacting in several ways: I feel happy that my gut feeling of something being wrong has been vindicated - in spite of the fact that my brother-the-psychologist stated that dd8 was "probably fine."  I feel hopeful that homeschool is possible - and that it can be more than just surviving drudgery.  We were told that, given her age and her diagnoses, it's likely that she'll be able to learn enough explicit social skills to be able to blend into the world fairly well as an adult. 

 

The fellow who worked with her for the evaluation is an autism specialist.  I'm not sure he's used to working with 2e kids because he stressed several times that her IQ meant that she "has the world before her," as if a high IQ can solve everything and make any career choice a great idea, regardless of strengths or weaknesses.  He also stressed several times that we ought to consider putting her in a B&M Gifted and Talented program for socialization and instruction.  "After all, teachers go to school an extra year or so to learn how to teach gifted kids" and "being both mother and teacher is asking a lot of you."  Overall, he generally seemed to be keeping his bias for public school under wraps, but it would occasionally pop up.

 

I'm hoping the therapist will be more understanding about homeschooling.

 

I'm planning to order several books today, a couple of which were suggested by the evaluator.  I also need to find small, short social activities for dd8 in areas of her strengths.  (I realized that I've been censoring her social involvement since our interstate move, probably because of a subconscious desire to avoid the awkwardness that inevitably ensues and which will likely be even more pronounced here where people haven't known her since infancy.)  We're trying a new strategy for school work, too - short, very focused bursts on subjects that she's struggled with in the past, with breaks in between.   

 

Simply having anything proactive to do - and feel it's justified due to an actual diagnosis - makes school better at the moment!

 

Thoroughly enjoying this bit of sunlight,

Mama Anna


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