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S/O Old School Curriculum


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#51 BatmansWife

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Posted 19 October 2017 - 09:50 PM

Sometimes if feels that homeschool life was simpler back 20+ years ago.  Fewer options back then seemed to make for easier choices.  Now there's so many options you can't possibly use all the stuff that you'd like to try.  A lot of this old school stuff is still great even today.  I think they just get pushed into the shadows of the new. 

 

What I remember being popular 20+ years ago:

 

Spelling Power (although I could never implement it)

Learning Language Arts Through Literature (I'm thinking the old ones with the different colored covers for each one)

Simply Grammar

Primary & Intermediate Language Lessons

Winston Grammar

Easy Grammar

Shurley English

Igniting Your Writing

Story Starters by Karen Andreola

Moving with Math

Professor B Math

Excel Math

Math It

Key To...

La Clase Divertida

Choreganizer

Art Adventures at Home

Home Science Adventures

Singapore Science (I remember when this was new and nearly impossible to get...it was like buying on the black market to get the teacher's manual)

Trail Guide to World and US Geography

Around the World in 180 Days

Bob Books

Reading Reflex

Astronauts to Zippers

Phonetic Zoo

Alpha Phonics

Hooked on Phonics

 

Lapbooks were poplular... 

 

Then there's "Newer old school" like Math Mammoth, RightStart Math, Great Science Adventures (these were new and all the rage back in the day).

 

My all time favorites, that I would still use today if I had the opportunity, would be:

Mastering Mathematics

Mountainwood Talking Letters

Alphabet Island

These still give me warm fuzzies...  :001_wub:  


Edited by BatmansWife, 20 October 2017 - 12:17 AM.


#52 PentecostalMom

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Posted 22 October 2017 - 07:34 PM

Sometimes if feels that homeschool life was simpler back 20+ years ago. Fewer options back then seemed to make for easier choices. Now there's so many options you can't possibly use all the stuff that you'd like to try. A lot of this old school stuff is still great even today. I think they just get pushed into the shadows of the new.

What I remember being popular 20+ years ago:

Spelling Power (although I could never implement it)
Learning Language Arts Through Literature (I'm thinking the old ones with the different colored covers for each one)
Simply Grammar
Primary & Intermediate Language Lessons
Winston Grammar
Easy Grammar
Shurley English
Igniting Your Writing
Story Starters by Karen Andreola
Moving with Math
Professor B Math
Excel Math
Math It
Key To...
La Clase Divertida
Choreganizer
Art Adventures at Home
Home Science Adventures
Singapore Science (I remember when this was new and nearly impossible to get...it was like buying on the black market to get the teacher's manual)
Trail Guide to World and US Geography
Around the World in 180 Days
Bob Books
Reading Reflex
Astronauts to Zippers
Phonetic Zoo
Alpha Phonics
Hooked on Phonics

Lapbooks were poplular...

Then there's "Newer old school" like Math Mammoth, RightStart Math, Great Science Adventures (these were new and all the rage back in the day).

My all time favorites, that I would still use today if I had the opportunity, would be:
Mastering Mathematics
Mountainwood Talking Letters
Alphabet Island
These still give me warm fuzzies... :001_wub:


Wow, some of these were and still are favorites, I own those old LLATL levels and we loved loved loved Math-It!

Some of the other responses make me say what!?!?! because they don’t seem really old at all to me!


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#53 Sebastian (a lady)

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Posted 22 October 2017 - 07:54 PM

We didn't have a computer until after we had been homeschooling a couple of yrs. Copying was done at Kinkos. I still use Math It techniques for teaching addition. Winston Grammar is in a box somewhere. Greenleaf Press was my other major catalog.


I remember coveting the complete history resource set in the Greenleaf catalog.

I have a couple of the Famous Men of... books in turn of the (20th) century editions.
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#54 Sebastian (a lady)

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Posted 22 October 2017 - 08:08 PM

Old stuff I've liked

Dolciani math
Famous Men of series

I See Sam phonics readers (I learned to read on these.)

Adventures in Literature high school series.

American Heritage History of the United States.

Janson's History of Art for Young People

Durant's Story of Civilization

American Heritage Junior Library and Horizon Caravel Junior Library

Landmark and We Were There biography and history series

32 Problems in World History by Edwin Fenton

American Government by Ethel Wood

Handbook of Nature Study
Discover Nature series by Lawlor
One Small Square nature books
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#55 shinyhappypeople

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Posted 22 October 2017 - 08:58 PM

I have to chime in because I started homeschooling before the internet....

 

Who remembers Winston Grammar and Math-It! And yes, Elijah Co. and Lifetime Books and Gifts were THE homeschool sources back in the day.

 

I *love* Winston Grammar and am currently using it with both my girls - one with LDs, and one without.  I truly don't understand why it isn't more popular.

 

I use "old school" 2nd ed. Saxon with the middle school daughter.  I'm all about get-it-done "sensible shoes" math.  It's not exciting but, wow, it is so good (and so cheap). 

 

Is IEW considered "old school" yet?  The videos we have show kids from what looks like the early 2000s.  It's been around a long time and is still going strong.



#56 wehave8

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Posted 23 October 2017 - 04:38 AM

Figure It Out

 

I still have these!

 

https://www.amazon.c...PD840CBSMDD83TH

 

 

Pam



#57 klmama

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Posted 23 October 2017 - 06:02 PM

I don't read much about these anymore, but they were still used a lot when I started homeschooling many years ago - various levels of difficulty. The others have already been mentioned.

Sing Spell Read and Write
Wordsmith
Wordsmith Apprentice
Wordsmith Craftsman
Writer's Inc.
Warriner's Grammar &Composition OR Warriner's Composition &Grammar (2 different series)
Easy Grammar
Natural Speller
Spelling Power
Jensen's Format Writing and other books by Frode Jensen
Writing Strands








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#58 MedicMom

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Posted 29 October 2017 - 04:49 PM

When I was homeschooled in the 80s and 90s we had:
Abeka
Lifepacs
Saxon math
Shirley grammar
Konos (on Fridays)

I’d forgotten about Shirley grammar! I hated it. I also hated Math-it. Dear god I hated it.

We used all of the above. Not so much Angela/BJU but many of my friends did. My mom especially liked Greenleaf Press and LLATL. We went through most of them. I wrote a lot so we tried Writing Strands back in 1994-1995 era, but I never really got into it.

I did the Weaver curriculum way back in the late 80s. Eventually my mom transitioned to KONOS.

It’s all so different now.

Edited by MedicMom, 29 October 2017 - 04:52 PM.

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#59 Momto4inSoCal

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Posted 30 October 2017 - 10:40 PM

We are using Latin Book 1 by Scott and Horn. It seems pretty old and it's out of print but out of all the Latin books I've looked at and purchased this has by far been the easiest one for me (not knowing Latin) to teach.
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#60 eternalsummer

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Posted 30 October 2017 - 10:55 PM

Harriet Taylor Treadwell's Reading Literature primer and first/second readers

Audiobooks. Audiobooks in the car, at the grocery, on trips, while doing chores, during handwriting, and to listen to while reading along at the same time. Not in the place of reading, but in addition to reading. Audiobooks create good readers and good writers, enhance auditory attention skills, and fill their heads with knowledge, context, and beautiful language. They help with empathy and with logic. And they keep them quieter and out of trouble. Two of my kids scored perfect 800s on the reading and writing portions of the SAT and the others have been in the 700s--I credit the hundreds and hundreds (thousands? I've never crunched the numbers but it seems like it could be thousands) of hours spent with books.

 

What were your favorites?  I hesitate to buy audiobooks, although I like them, because I am afraid I'll hate the reading voice or something.



#61 Hunter

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Posted 31 October 2017 - 03:44 AM

What were your favorites?  I hesitate to buy audiobooks, although I like them, because I am afraid I'll hate the reading voice or something.

 

Does your library let you borrow audiobooks from overdrive and Hoopla?



#62 eternalsummer

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Posted 31 October 2017 - 05:35 AM

We don't use small electronic devices, so I'd be playing them on CDs in the car, probably.  Although I could maybe buy the mp3 or whatever and play them on the computer?


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#63 Hunter

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Posted 31 October 2017 - 04:42 PM

We don't use small electronic devices, so I'd be playing them on CDs in the car, probably.  Although I could maybe buy the mp3 or whatever and play them on the computer?

 

 

You can download library Overdrive and Hoopla audiobooks onto a computer and play them on it.


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