Jump to content


What's with the ads?

Photo
- - - - -

S/O reinventing - will you stay involved w/hs'ing?

veteran hsers retired hsers post homeschool

141 replies to this topic

What's with the ads?

#1 Tibbie Dunbar

Tibbie Dunbar

    Apprentice Bee Keeper

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 6262 posts

Posted 12 October 2017 - 01:40 PM

Gonna stick around as a resource person, guidance counselor, co-op teacher, tutor, writer, or mentor?

I am not. The Tibbie of ten or even five years ago would be astounded by that, but I'm pretty much over the hs'ing community, present company excepted. I'm not even sure I still think hs'ing should be as free-for-all legal as it is in my low regulation state and others, but since I can argue both sides until the cows come home, I have grown tired of thinking about it. Not just tired, but exhausted.

I'm not going to follow national public education news anymore, either, except for the purpose of selecting political candidates.

The only title still possibly on the table would be Homeschool Grandma; I'd do it if a grandchild needed me. But unlike when I was younger and fondly imagined Grandma School, now I hope their parents will be able to figure it out.

What about you?
  • samba, Cindy in FL., brehon and 16 others like this

#2 Crimson Wife

Crimson Wife

    Qualified Bee Keeper

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 19097 posts

Posted 12 October 2017 - 01:45 PM

I think I would like to offer learning disabilities evaluations to HS families because there is a HUUUUUGE shortage of pro-HS evaluators. Most professionals have major "credentialism" bias and think that all the child's problems are due to being HSed by an uncredentialed parent and would be solved by putting the child into PS :thumbdown:


  • samba, transientChris, Anne and 16 others like this

#3 MysteryJen

MysteryJen

    Empress Bee

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 3284 posts

Posted 12 October 2017 - 01:48 PM

No. Having seen it all, good and mediocre homeschooling, good and abysmally bad public schooling, I am not going to do anymore than vote for school choice and try to educate my little corner of the world.

 

 

 

 

 


  • Liz CA, amsunshine, mom2scouts and 4 others like this

#4 Shelly in IL

Shelly in IL

    Hive Mind Queen Bee

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 3010 posts

Posted 12 October 2017 - 01:48 PM

My eldest is a senior and is graduating high school this year. I am not going to be involved with anything education related. I am so thrilled to be done and am enjoying being my own person.
  • Lady Florida., amsunshine, UmMusa and 4 others like this

#5 regentrude

regentrude

    Qualified Bee Keeper

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 25752 posts

Posted 12 October 2017 - 01:54 PM

I am still on this board. I have benefited greatly from the experiences of those who came before me, especially for navigating the college application process. I am glad to pay it forward and share the expertise I have in certain areas.

 

I am not involved in my local HS community; that was never a match academically and purely a social opportunity for my children.

I am, however, mentoring some homeschooled young adults as they try to navigate the transition to college.


  • Liz CA, dirty ethel rackham, transientChris and 24 others like this

#6 Catheryn

Catheryn

    Amateur Bee Keeper

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 4819 posts

Posted 12 October 2017 - 01:56 PM

nm


Edited by lllllll, 16 October 2017 - 08:00 AM.

  • dirty ethel rackham, Patty Joanna and Sandwalker like this

#7 Where's Toto?

Where's Toto?

    Eclectically Us-Schooling

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 6637 posts

Posted 12 October 2017 - 01:58 PM

Maybe.  I'm not overly involved in the homeschooling community now.  I am starting a business offering science classes to homeschoolers and if that works out the way I envision it, I will probably continue even after my kids are done.  But I also have 6-8 years left so who knows what will happen in that period of time.


  • amsunshine likes this

#8 onelittlemonkey

onelittlemonkey

    I'm not superstitious, but I am a little stitious. -MGS

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 1602 posts

Posted 12 October 2017 - 01:59 PM

Nope. As of January, except for some math and English work, I’m turning ds over to the technical college. I.am.done. I don’t really ever want to think about school again. Except maybe my own. I’m thinking about finishing my associates and possibly going for my bachelors. I love learning, but I’m tired of homeschooling. At least for now.
  • Lady Florida. likes this

#9 Lady Florida.

Lady Florida.

    New again (old) avatar. Same old me.

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 12709 posts

Posted 12 October 2017 - 02:01 PM

I already know the answer is no, and like you I wouldn't have thought so 10 years ago. As ds headed into his teen years though, I could see that I wanted to be done. When he reached the end of middle school age I sold the umbrella school I ran because I didn't want to be involved once ds finished school. Although he only graduated in May 2016, I had started backing away earlier when he began dual enrollment and we were no longer really actively homeschooling.

 

I once promised my niece who I'm very close to that if she decided to homeschool her kids I'd be there to help. I have to admit I'm relieved she sent them to school. I would have kept my promise and would have done my best but I'm glad I don't have to. I would also be involved as a grandma if asked but I wouldn't push it. That too though is unlikely. Oldest grandson started kindergarten this year and public school is on the horizon for both boys. 

 

If homeschool rights were truly threatened I'd join the fight to protect them, but I no longer believe in complete hands-off no regulation homeschooling. I think there should be some accountability. As an umbrella school owner I saw abuses of the umbrella school option (in my state an umbrella school is considered a private school and the state takes a mostly hands-off approach to private schools). I actually had parents ask me if I would back date their kids' enrollment so they wouldn't get in trouble. Um, no. 

 

 

I do follow the politics of public school/private school issues partly for the purpose of choosing candidates but also because I have children in my life in public school (the aforementioned niece's kids and grandkids).


Edited by Lady Florida., 13 October 2017 - 08:50 AM.

  • mamaraby, onelittlemonkey and PinkyandtheBrains. like this

#10 Crimson Wife

Crimson Wife

    Qualified Bee Keeper

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 19097 posts

Posted 12 October 2017 - 02:07 PM

I also thought I could be a mentor of sorts at one point.  But, then, I realized I mostly cut ties with the hs'ing community ages ago - except for here.  This is my last connection with hs'ing.  I never even talk about it much unless someone else brings it up.  And, even then, I am cautious, asking a few questions to see whether the interest is real.  Only then do I talk openly about hs'ing.

 

I find mentoring is hard because today's new HSers seemed to be super-obsessed with doing PS-at-home and using only Common-Core-aligned products. It used to be the first thing you would do as a new HSer was figure out which approach appealed to you- classical, Charlotte Mason, SonLight or other boxed programs, unit studies, "unschooling", etc. Minimal (if any) attention was paid to the state standards.

 

It wasn't THAT long ago (I started in '06) but it feels like a completely different era and I just can't relate to the CCSS-obsessed newbies.


  • dirty ethel rackham, Murphy101, Catheryn and 7 others like this

#11 Lady Florida.

Lady Florida.

    New again (old) avatar. Same old me.

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 12709 posts

Posted 12 October 2017 - 02:09 PM

I had thought I'd like to do something.  But the further I get away from it, the less I think that.  I was never much of a 'kid person' to begin with.  I did fine with my own, but working with kids, generally, doesn't sound very appealing to me.  It would have to be very unusual circumstances for me to do that.


I was a teacher for 15 years before being a homeschool mom. I loved both, but am done. I don't want to teach anyone anymore.
 

I also thought I could be a mentor of sorts at one point.  But, then, I realized I mostly cut ties with the hs'ing community ages ago - except for here.  This is my last connection with hs'ing.  I never even talk about it much unless someone else brings it up.  And, even then, I am cautious, asking a few questions to see whether the interest is real.  Only then do I talk openly about hs'ing.


Yep. That's what I thought and that's what I realized. I have a handful of very good friends who I met in our homeschool group when ds was little. We're all done homeschooling but our friendships lasted. Other than our shared past I have no connection to homeschoolers anymore. We don't even talk about homeschooling when we get together.
 

I had also thought I might write up what we did for my kids.  And I did a little of that.  But what I found was that their memories are much better than mine, so, without them here to talk to, I can only write a partial account.  I remember the things they tell me about; but only when they tell me.  And I can't expect them to sit and do that nonstop.  So not sure what I'll do there.


I once thought I'd write something about homeschooling an only child or homeschooling a child with ADHD but there seems to be enough out there that my two cents isn't really needed. Also, I think homeschooling has changed so much since my days of creating my own curriculum, doing unit studies, etc. Many of today's homeschoolers seem to want everything prepared for them and all I could offer them is how to do it yourself. They don't seem to want that.


  • samba and Catheryn like this

#12 Crimson Wife

Crimson Wife

    Qualified Bee Keeper

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 19097 posts

Posted 12 October 2017 - 02:11 PM

 
 Also, I think homeschooling has changed so much since my days of creating my own curriculum, doing unit studies, etc. Many of today's homeschoolers seem to want everything prepared for them and all I could offer them is how to do it yourself. They don't seem to want that.

 

And it has to be aligned to Common Core :rolleyes:


  • IEF and Sandwalker like this

#13 Element

Element

    Head Gamemaker

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 1541 posts

Posted 12 October 2017 - 02:13 PM

Uh, no. My children will be lucky if I can pull this off long enough to graduate everyone.  :laugh:


  • Cindy in FL., edelweiss, DawnM and 9 others like this

#14 DawnM

DawnM

    Qualified Bee Keeper

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 22278 posts

Posted 12 October 2017 - 02:15 PM

Currently working full time as a school counselor.  No time to do any HS stuff on the side, and quite frankly, when I was not working, I rarely offered anything to HSers.....I felt like they didn't like to hear the answer anyway, and I wasn't going to argue with them.  It just wasn't worth the effort.  If you truly think your kid is gifted, far be it from me to tell you he isn't..... :lol:


  • Catheryn, Lady Florida., connib and 1 other like this

#15 DawnM

DawnM

    Qualified Bee Keeper

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 22278 posts

Posted 12 October 2017 - 02:18 PM

Uh, no. My children will be lucky if I can pull this off long enough to graduate everyone.  :laugh:

 

I didn't.  Once my oldest started dual enrollment, I was done.   He was the one I HSed for (LDs, ASD, etc...) so once that wasn't needed, off they went to school.

 

And I missed working.  I really did.  People kept telling me to "give it a couple of years" but every year I wanted to work again.  Finally, after 10 years of HSing and staying home, I have gone back to work and I don't want to quit working.  I may not like everything about my job, but I love that I am doing it.


  • Hannah, Quill, FaithManor and 3 others like this

#16 BarbecueMom

BarbecueMom

    Bad Wolf

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 3269 posts

Posted 12 October 2017 - 02:24 PM

I'm having a really hard time "fitting in" as a homeschooling parent. I thought it would be easier, but instead it's just a different kind of hard. I don't think I'll be sticking around, when I really wasn't there to begin with. I don't think I'll have anything to offer.

#17 Liz CA

Liz CA

    Apprentice Bee Keeper

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 13080 posts

Posted 12 October 2017 - 02:26 PM

I returned to work and it is consuming as much time as I used to devote to homeschooling.

If anyone asks me about resources, I would point them in some directions. Otherwise I am not involved in anything anymore other than this board.

And even here, I am only on the Chat board with rare exceptions.

I would still recommend home education to those who have a sincere desire to do it because it is not something you can do on the side - it is a full time job, especially with younger ones. Some personalities - both parents and students may lend themselves to public/private schooling better than homeschooling. Knowing the difference is essential.

 


Edited by Liz CA, 12 October 2017 - 02:28 PM.

  • Hannah, Quill and Seasider like this

#18 Seasider

Seasider

    anchored

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 8584 posts

Posted 12 October 2017 - 02:29 PM

I had thought not - still mostly thinking not. But a certain opportunity has presented itself that maybe a game changer. Can't imagine it will actually come to full fruition soon enough.

That's actually for the next few years prior to graduating my youngest. Once the nest is empty, no.

Personally I am tired of seeing battle done over trivial issues while the actual intellectual and fellowship needs of children are neglected in the meantime.
  • soror likes this

#19 Seasider

Seasider

    anchored

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 8584 posts

Posted 12 October 2017 - 02:30 PM

Gonna stick around as a resource person, guidance counselor, co-op teacher, tutor, writer, or mentor?

I am not. The Tibbie of ten or even five years ago would be astounded by that, but I'm pretty much over the hs'ing community, present company excepted. I'm not even sure I still think hs'ing should be as free-for-all legal as it is in my low regulation state and others, but since I can argue both sides until the cows come home, I have grown tired of thinking about it. Not just tired, but exhausted.

I'm not going to follow national public education news anymore, either, except for the purpose of selecting political candidates.

The only title still possibly on the table would be Homeschool Grandma; I'd do it if a grandchild needed me. But unlike when I was younger and fondly imagined Grandma School, now I hope their parents will be able to figure it out.

What about you?


Field Trip Gramdma. Read Aloud Grandma. Never in a million years Math Grandma.
  • edelweiss, TechWife, FaithManor and 6 others like this

#20 happi duck

happi duck

    Hive Mind Queen Bee

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 8665 posts

Posted 12 October 2017 - 02:31 PM

Gonna stick around as a resource person, guidance counselor, co-op teacher, tutor, writer, or mentor?

I am not. The Tibbie of ten or even five years ago would be astounded by that, but I'm pretty much over the hs'ing community, present company excepted. I'm not even sure I still think hs'ing should be as free-for-all legal as it is in my low regulation state and others, but since I can argue both sides until the cows come home, I have grown tired of thinking about it. Not just tired, but exhausted.

I'm not going to follow national public education news anymore, either, except for the purpose of selecting political candidates.

The only title still possibly on the table would be Homeschool Grandma; I'd do it if a grandchild needed me. But unlike when I was younger and fondly imagined Grandma School, now I hope their parents will be able to figure it out.

What about you?


This is my answer exactly.
  • 8circles likes this

#21 MEmama

MEmama

    Amateur Bee Keeper

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 3847 posts

Posted 12 October 2017 - 02:33 PM

I was never involved in a homeschool community of any kind so there's nothing there for me to discontinue. I briefly flirted with the idea of going into early childhood education, but honestly I don't really like other people's kids that much and I'm not sure I'd have the energy to deal with them all day. I took that off the table pretty quickly. Lol
  • Rebel Yell likes this

#22 Catheryn

Catheryn

    Amateur Bee Keeper

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 4819 posts

Posted 12 October 2017 - 02:34 PM

nm 

 


Edited by lllllll, 16 October 2017 - 08:00 AM.

  • Lady Florida., slr1765, Crimson Wife and 1 other like this

#23 FaithManor

FaithManor

    Empress of the Flaming Bees, Order of the Spork

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 16078 posts

Posted 12 October 2017 - 02:38 PM

I am in the same camp. Not going to be involved in the homeschool world anymore though may visit here once in a while, and not so certain it should be the free for all no accountability of my zero regulation state. Due to not fitting in with the religious bent of the local homeschool groups so have never joined up - many of which have disbanded in the past couple of years - I have not been "in" the homeschool community per se. 

 

I am battling with homeschool fatigue all through this college application season, and making myself nuts staying upbeat and motivated for ds's sake because he does not deserve less than what his siblings received for support and assistance. I will be so crazy glad when the financial packages are in, he makes a decision, and we make a dorm deposit. He'll have everything but French and Calc 1 done by February, and to make sure he is ready for his engineering major, he's going to take a college calc 1 class next semester. French will be the only thing I have to teach and it will be completed no later than May 14th since he has paced himself to have no assignments or exams to complete when he gets back from his rocketry competition. I can generate the last final transcript ever, and off it goes. Dh is planning a little homeschool retirement party for me.

 

I am proud of what we have accomplished, and blessed to have done that for my kids, but I am done, done, done with it. Grandkids can count on Marmee to make financial contributions to a good Lutheran K-8 or other private school for them.

 

I do love teaching STEM very, very much, and I do need to make money so I'm working limited part time right now as a STEM mentor/consultant now. I will be doing that about 25 hours a week next year. It is all robotics, rocketry, applied mathematics, and physical science/physics K-8. But the thing is, I do a lot with the teachers, and lecture and answer questions with the kids, but do not run the program, do not have responsibility for classroom management or discipline, etc. I literally consult and am out the door. If I make the move to high school First Tech Robotics or Vex, I would be more hands on however, I am not looking to do that at this time. My local school really needs subs. It's something to consider if I want to do less traveling with the consulting job. It is again a different educational animal than homeschooling so I think I'd be okay with that. The pay is poor though, really pathetic however, the flexibility is very nice since my mom has health problems.

 

It also brings up the question of 4H.  August 2018 brings us to our ten year anniversary with that organization. The burnout here is very real. We have poured ourselves into it, and the number of volunteer hours we have dedicated is startlingly large. MSU keeps adding more and more paperwork, more and more complications, and more and more fundraising or volunteering requirements onto a sea of already overworked volunteers. For 2017/18 it is going to take 30 hours to do all of the paperwork and updates for club re-enrollment as well as students. We will have four, two hour mandatory leader meetings, four hours of volunteer work to set up for the fair, four hours of volunteer work to tear down the fair, four hours of fundraising work during the fair, four hours of volunteering the Saturday before the fair for project check-in, and that is on top of the hours that the leader puts into the club itself meeting with students and mentoring their projects. With the club and the rocket team this year, we'll have over 200 hours not including the week DH takes off from work to take the team to Washington D.C. So add about 5 days of 24/7 volunteerism. We are being pressured to join the state council and maybe take a place on national, and leadership is flabbergasted that we keep saying NO. It simply is not sustainable. While other clubs don't have a rocket team and all that entails, the agriculture club leaders have an absolute ton of meetings, crazy amount of paperwork due to bio hazard stuff with the animals, and are toting their club members to MSU frequently and out of state for shows.They are putting in a ridiculous amount of work, and at no time does State consider easing up on the overworked volunteer army. We've been told to expect 2018/19 to be even worse. I think they will eventually work us all to death, and the whole thing will become so complicated that they can't sucker newbies into trying which will cause 4H in the state to die out.

 

So as much as we have loved the time we've spent with the kids, and as much as we know the STEM program we built is likely to fall entirely flat and into oblivion when we go, it isn't looking promising to stick with it after ds graduates. It isn't sustainable.

 

Music is also on the horizon. I have some accompanying options for several city churches with robust programs as well as at the college level for a couple of schools that don't have enough pianists. I'll take on some accompanying again for Solo and Ensemble, maybe even judging as well. 

 

ETA and the master's degree. Still thinking about finally getting that thesis done.


Edited by FaithManor, 12 October 2017 - 02:41 PM.

  • Hannah and Rebel Yell like this

#24 Seasider

Seasider

    anchored

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 8584 posts

Posted 12 October 2017 - 02:38 PM

FloridaMom said:

"Many of today's homeschoolers seem to want everything prepared for them and all I could offer them is how to do it yourself. They don't seem to want that."

Yep, seeing the same here. Most common question on local eloop is, "What curriculum can my child do on the computer all by himself so I don't have to do it with him?" Sigh.
  • dirty ethel rackham, Crimson Wife, soror and 2 others like this

#25 Supertechmom

Supertechmom

    Hive Mind Queen Bee

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 1300 posts

Posted 12 October 2017 - 02:40 PM

I am still on this board. I have benefited greatly from the experiences of those who came before me, especially for navigating the college application process. I am glad to pay it forward and share the expertise I have in certain areas.

 

I am not involved in my local HS community; that was never a match academically and purely a social opportunity for my children.

I am, however, mentoring some homeschooled young adults as they try to navigate the transition to college.

 

I see me doing that. Mentoring and helping people navigate college.

 

I find mentoring is hard because today's new HSers seemed to be super-obsessed with doing PS-at-home and using only Common-Core-aligned products. It used to be the first thing you would do as a new HSer was figure out which approach appealed to you- classical, Charlotte Mason, SonLight or other boxed programs, unit studies, "unschooling", etc. Minimal (if any) attention was paid to the state standards.

 

It wasn't THAT long ago (I started in '06) but it feels like a completely different era and I just can't relate to the CCSS-obsessed newbies.

 

Also agree with this.  Local home schoolers seem to be public school dropouts looking for someone to hold their hand and direct them every step of the way.   They don't want to teach but don't want the  brick and mortar teacher either and can't afford private school.  So they go with the online public schools and then seem shocked and upset that my kids are rocking their own thing instead of their thing.  And then get upset that I don't include their kids in my thing and freely teach their kids. So I do very little any more with local homeschoolers.   They always seems irritated about their restrictions vs why I have so much freedom.  So I'll most likely just help students figure out how to get into college when I finish homeschooling


  • Murphy101 likes this

#26 Acadie

Acadie

    Hive Mind Worker Bee

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 555 posts

Posted 12 October 2017 - 02:42 PM

I'm hungry to dive deeply into my own creative projects and to see where they lead me. It's no accident that I'm also feeling powerfully averse to adding any more work with kids and teaching right now. That could change, but my internal compass is very clear on what I want to do next. I was going to say it has nothing to do with homeschooling, but one of several projects is a children's book I would have loved for homeschooling my girls.

 

I feel like I have to retrain my brain to focus and do deep work, when for so many years I've been multitasking and handling so many people's needs. But I'm so excited it's on the horizon.

 

Amy 

 

 


  • Spryte and mom2scouts like this

#27 Evanthe

Evanthe

    Amateur Bee Keeper

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 6227 posts

Posted 12 October 2017 - 02:45 PM

Even though my teens are approaching college, I basically signed up for another 20 years.  We had a caboose baby a couple of years ago.  And the older kids insist they're going to homeschool *their* kids.  So, no escape for me anytime soon.   :leaving:



#28 FaithManor

FaithManor

    Empress of the Flaming Bees, Order of the Spork

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 16078 posts

Posted 12 October 2017 - 02:47 PM

FloridaMom said:

"Many of today's homeschoolers seem to want everything prepared for them and all I could offer them is how to do it yourself. They don't seem to want that."

Yep, seeing the same here. Most common question on local eloop is, "What curriculum can my child do on the computer all by himself so I don't have to do it with him?" Sigh.

Hey, at least they think they should accomplish something! The new breed of homeschooler around here is, "I am too lazy to get my kids up for the bus or drive them to school, and I don't really want to teach anything, so what is the very least i can possibly do and not be truant? Better yet, do I have to do anything at all?" 

 

GAH!

 

I am glad my kid is getting out and into college before this next wave of "homeschooling" parents so ruins the reputation of homeschooling that colleges and professional programs start rejecting homeschoolers. 

 

I am too old for this nonsense!


  • Catheryn, Quill, laundrycrisis and 3 others like this

#29 Prairie~Phlox

Prairie~Phlox

    Hive Mind Queen Bee

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 2596 posts

Posted 12 October 2017 - 02:50 PM

Nope!

#30 Quill

Quill

    Team Introvert - Captain

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 17391 posts

Posted 12 October 2017 - 02:54 PM

I think I would like to offer learning disabilities evaluations to HS families because there is a HUUUUUGE shortage of pro-HS evaluators. Most professionals have major "credentialism" bias and think that all the child's problems are due to being HSed by an uncredentialed parent and would be solved by putting the child into PS :thumbdown:


This is what I would like to do, too. Although you have a way better head start than I have on getting the credentials necessary to offer that. But this is what I have a notion I would like to do.

But as far as being Homeschool Grandma - hellz to the no. And yes, it surpises me that I think that; it's only been a few years since I wanted to foster/adopt a couple more kids, which now the thought of doing that is the stuff of nightmares. I could maybe do it if my kid was in a dire situation and I needed to co-parent my grandbaby, but it is really, really, really not something I want to do. I want to GIVEAWAY/SELL ALL of this freakin stuff and move to or build a house that does not even have the space potential for a homeschool studio like we have now.

Nevertheless, I still have my Handwriting Without Tears widdle wooden letters because they are so dang cute!
  • Zebra, Acadie and Rebel Yell like this

#31 Evanthe

Evanthe

    Amateur Bee Keeper

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 6227 posts

Posted 12 October 2017 - 02:54 PM

FloridaMom said:

"Many of today's homeschoolers seem to want everything prepared for them and all I could offer them is how to do it yourself. They don't seem to want that."

Yep, seeing the same here. Most common question on local eloop is, "What curriculum can my child do on the computer all by himself so I don't have to do it with him?" Sigh.

 

:iagree:   Unfortunately, yep.  The younger parents I've talked to won't even entertain the idea that they can work with their kids or teach them anything without an expert helping them.  They also need to be plugged into some kind of "system" with people guiding them.  

 

And I don't know what they are afraid of.  There are so many resources out there now.  Not even homeschooling resources, but stuff like podcasts, the internet, Youtube, Kindles, Khan Academy, Amazon, etc.  None of that stuff was around when my sisters homeschooled and even they did fine.  My mom just had to find stuff at Barnes and Noble in the mall - I kid you not...     

 

I think it was SWB who had an article on Facebook talking about how homeschooling numbers have stopped growing.  I wonder if it has something to do with this mindset. 


  • Catheryn, Rosie_0801, Crimson Wife and 4 others like this

#32 Quill

Quill

    Team Introvert - Captain

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 17391 posts

Posted 12 October 2017 - 02:58 PM

I am battling with homeschool fatigue all through this college application season, and making myself nuts staying upbeat and motivated for ds's sake because he does not deserve less than what his siblings received for support and assistance. I will be so crazy glad when the financial packages are in, he makes a decision, and we make a dorm deposit.


#relate
  • FaithManor likes this

#33 Crimson Wife

Crimson Wife

    Qualified Bee Keeper

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 19097 posts

Posted 12 October 2017 - 02:59 PM

 
Yep, seeing the same here. Most common question on local eloop is, "What curriculum can my child do on the computer all by himself so I don't have to do it with him?" Sigh.

 

Which is one thing if you're talking a middle or high schooler who has gotten beyond what mom can teach him/her. But quite another when said mom is talking about elementary school. Even the most clueless mom can do a scripted program like Right Start Math, OPGTR, AAS/AAR, etc.


  • Rosie_0801, mom2scouts and Seasider like this

#34 Hilltopmom

Hilltopmom

    Hive Mind Queen Bee

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 2150 posts

Posted 12 October 2017 - 02:59 PM

I’ve got caboose babies but they’re going to go to public school :)

I’m over homeschooling. It was great, I’m glad we did it, but the only teaching in my future is the kind they pay me for.
I even unjoined our local fb page because I can’t help myself from trying to mentor new folks and I don’t have the time or energy, I paid my dues, I feel.

I’ll hang out here another year or two, I bet as my oldest gets off to college. Not nearly as much time these days now that I’m back to paid out of the house teaching daily.
  • Quill and FaithManor like this

#35 FaithManor

FaithManor

    Empress of the Flaming Bees, Order of the Spork

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 16078 posts

Posted 12 October 2017 - 03:02 PM

:iagree:   Unfortunately, yep.  The younger parents I've talked to won't even entertain the idea that they can work with their kids or teach them anything without an expert helping them.  They also need to be plugged into some kind of "system" with people guiding them.  

 

And I don't know what they are afraid of.  There are so many resources out there now.  Not even homeschooling resources, but stuff like podcasts, the internet, Youtube, Kindles, Khan Academy, Amazon, etc.  None of that stuff was around when my sisters homeschooled and even they did fine.  My mom just had to find stuff at Barnes and Noble in the mall - I kid you not...     

 

I think it was SWB who had an article on Facebook talking about how homeschooling numbers have stopped growing.  I wonder if it has something to do with this mindset. 

It might. But to be fair, I also see in my area that it simply is not possible for families to make it on one income anymore. Wages have been stagnating for years, and expenses go up by ridiculous percentages, pensions are no longer offered, people are worried that social security will go broke so they'll have nothing for retirement unless both parents work, etc. not to mention the healthcare mess.

 

I don't think my kids' generation will have the flexibility of single income living even if they are super frugal.


  • Hannah, mamaraby, Aura and 4 others like this

#36 Zebra

Zebra

    Hive Mind Queen Bee

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 1585 posts

Posted 12 October 2017 - 03:02 PM

Nope!

My sentiments exactly!  



#37 Pawz4me

Pawz4me

    Hive Mind Level 6 Worker: Scout Bee

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 9433 posts

Posted 12 October 2017 - 03:04 PM

Other than following a few Yahoo groups I was never involved with the local homeschool community. We tried but never could find any academic matches for the boys, and the social groups we tried seemed to be full of cliques and not very interested in accepting new people into the circle. I do enjoy giving the occasional bit of advice/experience here and hope to continue to do that.



#38 Sadie

Sadie

    Beekeeping Professor

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 22691 posts

Posted 12 October 2017 - 03:08 PM

Probably. They will be a market for me. 

 

I am not interested in staying around in an unpaid role. 


  • WendyAndMilo likes this

#39 Evanthe

Evanthe

    Amateur Bee Keeper

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 6227 posts

Posted 12 October 2017 - 03:09 PM

It might. But to be fair, I also see in my area that it simply is not possible for families to make it on one income anymore.

 

We've had to pack up and move somewhere where we could make it on one income - 3x now, unfortunately.   :(   There's 7 of us living on one income here.  



#40 SamanthaCarter

SamanthaCarter

    Hive Mind Queen Bee

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 1040 posts

Posted 12 October 2017 - 03:11 PM

.

(Oops! Didn't mean to post. I'm just sadly following. I'm a homeschool mom that would love to have you around bringing a voice of experience and reason among a cacophony of homeschool moms whose oldest is 7 at most.)

Edited by SamanthaCarter, 12 October 2017 - 03:40 PM.

  • Rebel Yell, Southern Ivy, IEF and 2 others like this

#41 Seasider

Seasider

    anchored

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 8584 posts

Posted 12 October 2017 - 03:14 PM

:iagree: Unfortunately, yep. The younger parents I've talked to won't even entertain the idea that they can work with their kids or teach them anything without an expert helping them. They also need to be plugged into some kind of "system" with people guiding them.

And I don't know what they are afraid of. There are so many resources out there now. Not even homeschooling resources, but stuff like podcasts, the internet, Youtube, Kindles, Khan Academy, Amazon, etc. None of that stuff was around when my sisters homeschooled and even they did fine. My mom just had to find stuff at Barnes and Noble in the mall - I kid you not...

I think it was SWB who had an article on Facebook talking about how homeschooling numbers have stopped growing. I wonder if it has something to do with this mindset.


It's like homeschoolers have ceased being entrepreneurs* and have become exclusively consumers.

*meant in the creative sense, not the profit making sense. In fact, I wonder if that's part of the issue - all the last generation homeschoolers who commoditized homeschool practices to sell to the new generation. Something to think about.
  • elegantlion, ElizaG, Evanthe and 2 others like this

#42 Seasider

Seasider

    anchored

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 8584 posts

Posted 12 October 2017 - 03:15 PM

Dp

Edited by Seasider, 12 October 2017 - 03:17 PM.


#43 Seasider

Seasider

    anchored

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 8584 posts

Posted 12 October 2017 - 03:29 PM

It might. But to be fair, I also see in my area that it simply is not possible for families to make it on one income anymore. Wages have been stagnating for years, and expenses go up by ridiculous percentages, pensions are no longer offered, people are worried that social security will go broke so they'll have nothing for retirement unless both parents work, etc. not to mention the healthcare mess.

I don't think my kids' generation will have the flexibility of single income living even if they are super frugal.


So true. I think this has a lot to do with the clamor for self-teaching programs. Moms who stay at home may also be trying to work in addition to home school so they can afford to stay at home. Working while homeschooling has always been present, but it was done by a smaller number of people who were doing professional level jobs - teaching, nursing, that sort of thing, with defined hours that fit into a demanding but doable schedule.

Now so many more SAHMs are selling MLM products and grabbing business opportunities anytime they can, which is disruptive of the tutorial model. Not meaning to sound judgmental, but this is my true observation.
  • mamaraby, Southern Ivy, MysteryJen and 1 other like this

#44 ScoutTN

ScoutTN

    Hive Mind Queen Bee

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 7331 posts

Posted 12 October 2017 - 03:34 PM

Not sure. My main priority will be earning money to help pay for my kids' college.
  • DawnM, FaithManor and freesia like this

#45 Matryoshka

Matryoshka

    Apprentice Bee Keeper

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 11053 posts

Posted 12 October 2017 - 03:36 PM

I am so done teaching my own kids (even though youngest is just 16, but she's all outsourced, mostly at CC).

 

But it looks like I'm headed in the direction of language tutoring/teaching.  I was actually thinking of being a tutor to the community at large (like ps kids who need extra help), but it seems I've been getting a decent amount of work through my homeschool connections.  I started working with a group of 3 tweens last year in Spanish, this year I've added a new middle school aged homeschooler who also wants Spanish, and I've started working part-time at a new homeschooled drop-off program for teens, teaching a beginning Spanish class and German to some kids who just moved back from Europe.  I find I enjoy teaching kids who aren't mine! :lol:

 

None of this requires me to worry about the homeschooling philosophy or methods of the families I'm working with, which range from Classical to radical unschooling, as far as I can tell from not being too nosy.

 


Edited by Matryoshka, 12 October 2017 - 03:37 PM.

  • Sadie and SamanthaCarter like this

#46 Evanthe

Evanthe

    Amateur Bee Keeper

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 6227 posts

Posted 12 October 2017 - 03:37 PM

It's like homeschoolers have ceased being entrepreneurs* and have become exclusively consumers.

*meant in the creative sense, not the profit making sense. In fact, I wonder if that's part of the issue - all the last generation homeschoolers who commoditized homeschool practices to sell to the new generation. Something to think about.

 

Makes sense to me!


  • Quill likes this

#47 Lori D.

Lori D.

    Amateur Bee Keeper

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 11487 posts

Posted 12 October 2017 - 03:48 PM

YES! And I have been doing exactly that for the past 5 years. And find it fulfilling. :) And I would adore being a homeschool grandma -- just wouldn't want to take the joy of homeschooling away from future daughters-in-law if homeschooling themselves is the choice my sons & families would make. (I've even considered volunteering to come alongside 1-2 homeschool moms who have lost spouses, and come in to homeschool for 1-2 days week while moms work or get needed support or recovery time.)

 

Since I no longer have children at home to homeschool, I do the next closest thing that I can:

- mentor other homeschool moms (here, and in my local homeschool group)

- give homeschool talks

- teach homeschool co-op classes

- continue to write my own lesson plans and curricula

 

Thankfully, I don't need it to be a paying job, as DH's retirement is taking good care of us, and we live fairly modestly. And not at all "dissing" careers and earning money, but when I've looked over work values tests, making money, along with climbing the corporate ladder and status, are at the very bottom of what brings value and meaning to me in working. Helping others, working with children, and creating (in the form of making my own materials) are all at the very top of what I find fulfilling.

 

And no, I totally don't think homeschooling is for everyone, or for the entire time of a child's schooling. There are seasons to everything, and homeschooling may only be for a year or a dozen years of a parent's life. For me, there are just so many things about homeschooling that are fulfilling that I can't imagine stopping and trying to find other activities that would be as meaningful. :)

 

In case anyone else would find it helpful in finding what do after homeschooling by understanding what brings value and meaning to you, enjoy these quick work values assessments:

 

Work Values Inventory -- printable pdf

Work Values Inventory -- different printable pdf

Work Values Checklist of intrinsic, extrinsic, and lifestyle values


Edited by Lori D., 12 October 2017 - 04:31 PM.

  • Alice, transientChris, Catheryn and 11 others like this

#48 SparklyUnicorn

SparklyUnicorn

    Beekeeping Professor

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 36662 posts

Posted 12 October 2017 - 03:49 PM

nope

 

I mean I can't imaging not chatting here or with others I've met along the way who are involved with homeschooling, but beyond that no. 


  • Quill and IEF like this

#49 mom2scouts

mom2scouts

    Hive Mind Queen Bee

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 2764 posts

Posted 12 October 2017 - 03:52 PM

I still have eight years to go if I homeschool my two youngest through high school. I'm an older mother and, while I love homeschooling, I want to have time someday to do things for myself. I'm also a bit, I don't know, frustrated by younger homeschooling moms I see. I'm doing this because I have out of the box kids and I want to give them the best education I can. We do very little in the wider homeschool community because many of the parents seem to have very different goals than I have.  I still run into enough homeschoolers who never quite get around to the schooling part of homeschooling unless someone else is offering a class on it. They just drag their kids from this park day to that PE class to that science class at the museum and outsource everything or they only want things that are free and online. I sometimes think they'd be better off just putting their kids in school. 


Edited by mom2scouts, 12 October 2017 - 04:08 PM.

  • IEF likes this

#50 Kinsa

Kinsa

    Hive Mind Queen Bee

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 9607 posts

Posted 12 October 2017 - 04:00 PM

I doubt I'll be very involved.

I used to think I'd love to be a birthing assistant... when I was in the phase of life that I was having babies. Now I'm so beyond it and I have no interest anymore.

It's very similar with homeschooling.

I'm in my 18th year of homeschooling. I still have seven more to go. I'm ready to be done.

I'd help someone who honestly was asking for my help, but it's been my experience lately that people don't really want to listen. I've seen the changes in the hsing world, and I barely recognize it anymore.

This is the same reason that I rarely dole out advice on the general or curriculum forum HERE. My methods are old-fashioned. My curriculum choice are out of date. I've rendered myself irrelevant to the newer homeschoolers.

Edited by Kinsa, 12 October 2017 - 04:04 PM.

  • dirty ethel rackham, brehon, Catheryn and 7 others like this