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Former homeschooler hating public school


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#1 bethben

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Posted 06 October 2017 - 10:13 PM

I knew I would have issues.  I knew why people homeschooled and I know why I did.  I knew the public school would do things differently and knew they couldn't give individualized education just because of the sheer number of kids in a school.  I sent my dd to a school that everyone in the neighborhood seems to love.  They rave about it.  They rave about pictures of 3rd graders learning how to "write short constructed sentences" on the computer so they can do well on a standardized test.  

 

I like that my dd's and my relationship is a ton better than it was when I was homeschooling her.  She's happier because she's around friends more and when she's miserable, I have the emotional energy to deal with it. 

 

So, how can I do this gig without going crazy?!?!?  Do I just have to stop caring and try to just help her do her best?  I can't after school because she's already at school a crazy amount of time and she would lose it if I tried to do more with her.



#2 eternalsummer

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Posted 07 October 2017 - 06:05 AM

What I did when some of mine were in school, and not a school I really agreed with philosophically, was to say: what positives are they getting out of school that I can't give them?  (there are some, of course).  What negatives are there that I can address?  What negatives are there that I can't address?

 

The ones I can't address, if they are still worth dealing with because the positives make it worth it, I just tell myself are part of life right now, like the weather or international politics.  Out of my control, all I can do is help them manage as well as possible.


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#3 bethben

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Posted 07 October 2017 - 08:57 AM

DD gets social time which she really craves and her and I get time away from each other daily so that we can have a decent mother/daughter relationship.  That's the only positives.  I am teaching her math still and she is repeating everything we did in homeschool in 2nd and 3rd grade.  And this is considered an advanced school.  I do have the possibility of changing schools for her next year, but I'm concerned that she would be behind.



#4 eternalsummer

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Posted 07 October 2017 - 09:21 AM

That is all mine got from school too, and as long as the social time was positive (that is, they weren't bullied or picking up bad influences or etc.) I was willing to trade academics for it up to a certain age.  Now that my oldest is in 7th, I am also having trouble considering the exchange worth it.  Do you think they'd allow some independent study on her part?  Is she identified gifted? 



#5 EmilyGF

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Posted 07 October 2017 - 09:47 AM

My son is at a challenging public school whose philosophy I disagree with.

 

For me, I remind myself that we did this because things weren't working at home. I'm not comparing public school to perfect but to reality.

 

I'd love to send ds5 to a forest kindergarten or have him outside all day long with a half hour of academics thrown in. But that isn't happening. He was causing a lot of stress at home (to the point that ds12 was crying any day he tried to do school because of the chaos). I need to compare what is happening now at PS to what really would happen at home.

 

A warning, though, is to be careful not to undermine your child's teacher. I don't say, "Wow, this handwriting sheet is totally inappropriate developmentally!" but just allow a good enough job and try to make the time we have together positive.

 

Emily


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#6 bethben

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Posted 07 October 2017 - 10:09 AM

I don’t think dd is gifted. I just think the curriculum they love and rave about is mediocre. I have just come to realize that my standard when I homeschooled was pretty high and my kids succeeded at that level without me feeling like I was demanding too much. I felt like I could have pushed more even and had them succeed. Dd doesn’t do well with all the computer tests they love over there. She doesn’t fill out the written potion at all (I’m talking to her and will ask why) or if she does, she doesn’t fill out the appropriate buzz words that will have the computer mark it right.

No, I will never undermine her teacher because my mom was an undermined by the parents teacher. If she gets reprimanded for something at school I always ask what she did and try to help her see why the teacher did what he did. Honestly, the teacher is just a cog. He’s not in control of what they are learning nor how fast the class plows through material. Every fourth grade class does the same thing. I never speak of my frustrations with the school to her. Dd lives school because she’s a super social girl.

I guess if I was feeling like they were teaching math and language arts well, I could deal with the rest of it. I don’t feel like they are teaching the basics well at all. Those are the subjects I’m reteaching her at home.


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#7 EmilyGF

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Posted 07 October 2017 - 10:29 AM

I don’t think dd is gifted. I just think the curriculum they love and rave about is mediocre. I have just come to realize that my standard when I homeschooled was pretty high and my kids succeeded at that level without me feeling like I was demanding too much. I felt like I could have pushed more even and had them succeed. Dd doesn’t do well with all the computer tests they love over there. She doesn’t fill out the written potion at all (I’m talking to her and will ask why) or if she does, she doesn’t fill out the appropriate buzz words that will have the computer mark it right.

No, I will never undermine her teacher because my mom was an undermined by the parents teacher. If she gets reprimanded for something at school I always ask what she did and try to help her see why the teacher did what he did. Honestly, the teacher is just a cog. He’s not in control of what they are learning nor how fast the class plows through material. Every fourth grade class does the same thing. I never speak of my frustrations with the school to her. Dd lives school because she’s a super social girl.

I guess if I was feeling like they were teaching math and language arts well, I could deal with the rest of it. I don’t feel like they are teaching the basics well at all. Those are the subjects I’m reteaching her at home.


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Argh. I may be frustrated with some aspects of ds's school, but he is clearly learning a lot quickly.

 

Emily



#8 SKL

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Posted 07 October 2017 - 03:56 PM

One of my kids doesn't really learn much at school either.  But she wouldn't learn much more from me if I homeschooled.  She doesn't want me as a teacher and I have no desire to fight about that.  :)  So, on balance, for us, a love of school and the better relationship at home would be worth dealing with the negatives you describe.  Not to say you aren't right to be disappointed in the way they have structured things.


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#9 Sadie

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Posted 07 October 2017 - 05:15 PM

For my own sake, I really did have to stop caring about my philosophical differences with my dd's school. I still believe I am right and they are wrong :) But I just had to shrug my shoulders about it. 


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#10 Rosie_0801

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Posted 07 October 2017 - 06:22 PM

My dd is losing skills in school, but there's nothing I can do about it. So yeah, I basically have to avoid thinking about it as much as possible. When I can't help it, I write nasty letters to the education minister.



#11 bethben

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Posted 07 October 2017 - 10:19 PM

My dd is losing skills in school, but there's nothing I can do about it. So yeah, I basically have to avoid thinking about it as much as possible. When I can't help it, I write nasty letters to the education minister.


I just can’t seem to accept that as a viable alternative right now. My dd was learning to write a well thought out 3 paragraph paper last year. Now she is learning how to write concise sentences for online tests. I can’t let it go. I continue to look for alternatives where she still gets a decent education and we keep a good relationship.


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#12 Jean in Newcastle

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Posted 07 October 2017 - 10:36 PM

I just can’t seem to accept that as a viable alternative right now. My dd was learning to write a well thought out 3 paragraph paper last year. Now she is learning how to write concise sentences for online tests. I can’t let it go. I continue to look for alternatives where she still gets a decent education and we keep a good relationship.


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Is she losing the ability to write a three paragraph paper? Learning to write concise sentences is not the antithesis of writing a paper.

#13 bethben

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Posted 07 October 2017 - 10:48 PM

I have to find out what she is writing. I have to see if the teacher even reads any of it. Basically, all the writing she tells me about is so they can do well on standardized tests. Teacher conferences are coming up so I can ask questions at that point.


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#14 Earthmerlin

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Posted 09 October 2017 - 05:55 AM

Can you talk candidly to the teacher &/or principal? Or a central office specialist? Can you go in & observe? Are weekends a time when you can briefly homeschool? Or weave academics into home activities? Are there outside clubs, etc. with which she can get involved that focus on academic skills (in a fun way)? Isn't that writing (a novel) challenge coming up in Nov.? Can you have a heart-to-heart with your daughter & explain what's important to you (& see if she'd be game for a bit of 1-on-1 with you)?

In my case, I don't always agree with our local (raved about) school. I am lucky in that she loves to learn & spend time with me so I can squeeze in 'my' things. We play school a lot (her choice) & we love board games (we have lots of educational ones). We have lots of dinner conversations about math, current events, science, etc. I also bring home books that extend or enrich her learning. We go on outings that teach as well (i.e., Archives to see the US Constitution)--& I oftentimes can get a friend to come so it blends learning & social time. We usually go through her school papers to discuss strengths, weaknesses, & extensions. I buy kits or toys that teach something (excavating mummies, logic puzzles). I have even offered rewards for completely certain things. Plenty of open-ended discussions & lots of free play (esp outdoors) are important too. I have in my head an outline of what should be covered but I never get to it all. Nonetheless I think my daughter's education is well-rounded because she gets both school & home teachings.

#15 City Mouse

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Posted 11 October 2017 - 07:09 PM

Honestly, if your relationship with her is better, then that is what I would focus on. The best education in the world isn't worth a broken relationship.
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#16 Tsuga

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Posted 29 December 2017 - 08:51 PM

 Honestly, the teacher is just a cog. He’s not in control of what they are learning nor how fast the class plows through material.

 

I don't think that's a remotely effective environment and I dread getting graduates from a school like that.

 

I understand your desire not to undermine the teacher and I completely agree. It won't help.

 

Easy for me to say, because we have good schools here, but I'd do Beast Academy for math and do regular writing and screw the test. I wouldn't say that to my kid but I would teach them what will work in the long run and tell them that at school they are learning to play the school game, but at home they are learning to do life.

 

And move through it.

 

Have you made any progress?



#17 bethben

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Posted 29 December 2017 - 10:34 PM

Basically, I feel like this year is a wash.  She's developed stress verbal tics and still has them.  The doctor is suggesting that she may have ADD which is contributing to the verbal tics despite the fact that if a professional visited her classroom to diagnose ADD, he/she would not find it.  I've had the teacher and the school counselor develop an off paper 504 plan to help her better in the classroom.  

 

They did a research paper where they said they would do it all at school.  It was a two week process.  What wound up happening is dd was totally confused and we did the whole paper - from research to writing in 3 days.  Math is going OK.  I've decided to go through Saxon with her after school.  She is doing fine on math tests. The teachers admit they change and revise the math program to have it make more sense and don't do all the pages because it's overkill.  And, if they don't totally learn everything in 4th grade, much of it is repeated in 5th grade with a little more difficulty.  So, it seems like they're trying to make the best of a horrible program.  My new plan is to see what happens at the junior high level around here which means I have to figure out who to talk to at the junior high/senior high school.  I've heard it gets worse in some ways and unless I can feel confident they're going in a decent direction, I have figured out how to homeschool her so that it works for both of us better using a few co-ops to help.  

 

I guess overall, socially, she's doing great; our relationship is better; grades, she's doing great; getting a decent education - not so much.  


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#18 Tsuga

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Posted 29 December 2017 - 10:58 PM

Basically, I feel like this year is a wash.  She's developed stress verbal tics and still has them.  The doctor is suggesting that she may have ADD which is contributing to the verbal tics despite the fact that if a professional visited her classroom to diagnose ADD, he/she would not find it.  I've had the teacher and the school counselor develop an off paper 504 plan to help her better in the classroom. 

 

That's really hard. :(

 

 

My new plan is to see what happens at the junior high level around here which means I have to figure out who to talk to at the junior high/senior high school.  I've heard it gets worse in some ways and unless I can feel confident they're going in a decent direction, I have figured out how to homeschool her so that it works for both of us better using a few co-ops to help.

 

Sounds like a good plan.



#19 MarkT

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Posted 04 January 2018 - 08:18 AM

One of my kids doesn't really learn much at school either.  But she wouldn't learn much more from me if I homeschooled.  She doesn't want me as a teacher and I have no desire to fight about that.  :)  So, on balance, for us, a love of school and the better relationship at home would be worth dealing with the negatives you describe.  Not to say you aren't right to be disappointed in the way they have structured things.

Yes that was me with my gifted DS  - After schooling was OK to fill in the education gaps with some "struggles"  - he thanked me later for doing it - Senior in HS now with merit scholarships offered by several colleges



#20 FO4UR

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Posted 08 January 2018 - 01:35 PM

I have a middle schooler who hates ps.

 

She has always been a self-starter. I think she was 8/9 when I started giving her a list in our homeschool to work independently for the most part. Then she is plunked down in a PS where they micromanage everything. Not to mention, she has read every single book they used in class. The teacher learned not to call on her for literature lessons b/c she would have a great deal of fun spoiling the book for the rest of the class.

 

Life situations changed though, and I cannot be home with her even if she is capable of doing 90% of the work independently. It sucks. She is a gifted artist and writer. She is getting mediocre lessons in those areas. Her LA teacher has noticed that she has some unique skills, but that doesn't mean she gives her different work. So, there is that.

 

Sadly, she is resentful about my putting her in school, so our relationship is sunk either way...for now at least. It sucks!

 

 



#21 bethben

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Posted 09 January 2018 - 03:03 PM

I thought I would try to find out the progression of subjects and learning through this school district. No one seems willing or able to tell me how they plan to educate children through the grades. I’m not looking for specifics, but general things like, “When do they teach writing?” “Do they get textbooks to learn from in 6th-12th”? How much learning is done via computers? No one returns my calls and I can’t get answers. Asking these type of questions on the school PTO Facebook page is considered complaining. Am I expecting too much? Shouldn’t I as a parent know how the school is planning to educate my child?


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Edited by bethben, 09 January 2018 - 03:04 PM.

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#22 Tsuga

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Posted 10 January 2018 - 01:00 AM

I thought I would try to find out the progression of subjects and learning through this school district. No one seems willing or able to tell me how they plan to educate children through the grades. I’m not looking for specifics, but general things like, “When do they teach writing?” “Do they get textbooks to learn from in 6th-12th”? How much learning is done via computers? No one returns my calls and I can’t get answers. Asking these type of questions on the school PTO Facebook page is considered complaining. Am I expecting too much? Shouldn’t I as a parent know how the school is planning to educate my child?


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I personally do not believe you are asking too much. These questions should have been answerable at parent-teacher conferences or curriculum night or at a separate informational night.

 

That said, maybe I can help. Regarding curriculum if they are following the Common Core, that's the national standards, so it goes through expected outputs at each age:

 

Here are the fourth grade Common Core standards, in terms of expected outputs. Note that the common core is not a curriculum, so they don't detail how a school reaches this standards. Depending on the district, that may be leveled learning, lots of homework, all-in project-based learning, whatever.

 

http://www.corestand...A-Literacy/W/4/

 

 

Regarding the question of "do they get textbooks", that's vague. It probably depends on their schedule. Does the middle school have an informational night? Whom are you asking about textbooks? And anyway--are you worried about print reading, print textbooks, or what in particular? All valid questions, but very different answers. 

 

 

Another thing to think about is how your questions may be perceived. If you start with "I'm worried that..." or "I'm concerned that..." it is going to come across as basically "I don't trust you and I plan to tell you what I think would be better." If you have to meet goals for 20-30 kids, you just don't have time for that. So when you do get a voice, remember that the better you take the information, the more detail you will get. 

 

Finally, can you reach out to other parents in a non-questioning way? "We're new to public schools and there is so much I don't know. How can I find out more about supporting my child's love for learning and ability to meet standards?" Is one way of putting it. Ask older parents to sit down with you in person! Offer to buy them a coffee. Something to sweeten the deal.

 

Remember that informing parents is work. They have to pay a full time salary just to deal with people. So your best bet is to make it easy for them.

 

Good luck!


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#23 bethben

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Posted 10 January 2018 - 09:10 AM

I just don’t know if I can continue the public school route...I did get some answers. Basically, they can’t bring textbooks home 6th grade and up. And no, they don’t provide technology to access them at home either -that is up to the parents to provide. I’m not a fan of reading online for learning. There are too many studies out that show this type of learning to be inferior. I am a bad public school mom. The latest is my refusal to be pumped about a fundraiser that is taking away class time for two weeks so they can raise money for iPads and smart boards. I just can’t...maybe this is an indicator of the end of this.


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#24 Heigh Ho

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Posted 10 January 2018 - 10:14 AM

DId you find out if there are any textbooks grade 6 and up?

 

There aren't any here, except for DE classes and students have to purchase those if they aren't on free/red lunch.  Students are recommended to buy prep books and do them independently.  What people do is ask their teacher friends what they bought for their dc, and go buy those books or earlier editions. Or they pick what they used themselves..for ex, I use Dolciani math because I used all the books for independent study myself, so easy for me to pull up the explanation for what wasn't presented in class.  

 


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#25 vonfirmath

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Posted 10 January 2018 - 11:34 AM

I thought I would try to find out the progression of subjects and learning through this school district. No one seems willing or able to tell me how they plan to educate children through the grades. I’m not looking for specifics, but general things like, “When do they teach writing?” “Do they get textbooks to learn from in 6th-12th”? How much learning is done via computers? No one returns my calls and I can’t get answers. Asking these type of questions on the school PTO Facebook page is considered complaining. Am I expecting too much? Shouldn’t I as a parent know how the school is planning to educate my child?


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The PTO cannot answer these questions. They are parents, just like you.

(ETA: But if they have older kids they could give you an insight into what their older kids were doing.)

 

Whether kids get textbooks is probably going to vary. SOme teachers use textbooks. Some don't. Some have the textbooks for in class only. That's what I've seen -- so they can't answer that question definitively. They could tell you there are textbooks available for these classes and the textbooks are on computer for those subjects. OR etc.

 

They have a couple night s a year when they have open houses here where they have all the curriculum for parents to look at. Outside of that, I'd be looking up the Curriculum & Instruction Department and talking to them. And since that department has 20 people in it, It'd probably take some time to figure out exactly who I needed to talk to.

 

If you know what school your kid is zoned to go to, you might call and see if you can find the appropriate person to talk to there that could talk in generalities about how that specific school works.


Edited by vonfirmath, 10 January 2018 - 12:20 PM.

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#26 eternalsummer

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Posted 10 January 2018 - 12:55 PM

The PTO cannot answer these questions. They are parents, just like you.

(ETA: But if they have older kids they could give you an insight into what their older kids were doing.)

 

Whether kids get textbooks is probably going to vary. SOme teachers use textbooks. Some don't. Some have the textbooks for in class only. That's what I've seen -- so they can't answer that question definitively. They could tell you there are textbooks available for these classes and the textbooks are on computer for those subjects. OR etc.

 

They have a couple night s a year when they have open houses here where they have all the curriculum for parents to look at. Outside of that, I'd be looking up the Curriculum & Instruction Department and talking to them. And since that department has 20 people in it, It'd probably take some time to figure out exactly who I needed to talk to.

 

If you know what school your kid is zoned to go to, you might call and see if you can find the appropriate person to talk to there that could talk in generalities about how that specific school works.

 

 

I am pretty sure the OP's kid is in a specific charter school, not the general public she's zoned for, and that the charter is either k-8 and then there's a 9-12 version of the same charter or that it's k-5 and there's a 6-12 version (that's how most of the charters in our area work, anyway).

 

OP, if you're looking for a school with textbooks and not as many online-based resources, you might (maybe) look into a couple of the more classical charters in the area.  I know Thomas Maclaren (let me know if you want me to delete or edit the name) uses real actual books at least for the humanities, and they have their curricular progression online, but I am not sure what texts (or if any texts) they use for 6-8.  



#27 Tsuga

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Posted 10 January 2018 - 06:38 PM

I just don’t know if I can continue the public school route...I did get some answers. Basically, they can’t bring textbooks home 6th grade and up. And no, they don’t provide technology to access them at home either -that is up to the parents to provide. I’m not a fan of reading online for learning. There are too many studies out that show this type of learning to be inferior. I am a bad public school mom. The latest is my refusal to be pumped about a fundraiser that is taking away class time for two weeks so they can raise money for iPads and smart boards. I just can’t...maybe this is an indicator of the end of this.


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I would not want my kids learning in that environment either.

 

My only ask is that you would realize this is one district and their curriculum. There are many public schools which do not "teach to the test", which do not follow the all-online learning route.

 

I understand that there are probably many reasons you live where you do, but part of that choice is choosing a school.

 

I hope you can find a model that works for you. Is moving a possibility?


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#28 bethben

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Posted 10 January 2018 - 07:16 PM

We can choose any school as long as they let us in or we win the lottery system a lot of charter school have. I feel burnt. Everyone in my neighborhood raves raves raves about this school. Well, they also rave about the fact that now they’ve had two school assemblies back to back to promote the “fun run” fundraiser going on.

Also, I am wondering if a school “social contract” is normal. They encourage kids to “check” each other. Basically, if a student is acting up, other students are supposed to check the other student with a hand motion to help them remember to stop. My dd takes this very seriously. I’ve told her to cut down on the policing and she’s down to 8-10 times per day. She is so intent upon helping the teacher control the class that she’s not listening as well as she needs to. She wants to do her best and helping police the class to her best ability is what she wants to do. I hate this policy for her. She takes things to the extreme and to have her “only” check kids 8-10 times is horrible. I am actively looking elsewhere and going to other schools info meetings.


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#29 Tsuga

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Posted 11 January 2018 - 01:44 AM

We can choose any school as long as they let us in or we win the lottery system a lot of charter school have. I feel burnt. Everyone in my neighborhood raves raves raves about this school. Well, they also rave about the fact that now they’ve had two school assemblies back to back to promote the “fun run” fundraiser going on.

Also, I am wondering if a school “social contract” is normal. They encourage kids to “check” each other. Basically, if a student is acting up, other students are supposed to check the other student with a hand motion to help them remember to stop. My dd takes this very seriously. I’ve told her to cut down on the policing and she’s down to 8-10 times per day. She is so intent upon helping the teacher control the class that she’s not listening as well as she needs to. She wants to do her best and helping police the class to her best ability is what she wants to do. I hate this policy for her. She takes things to the extreme and to have her “only” check kids 8-10 times is horrible. I am actively looking elsewhere and going to other schools info meetings.


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Honestly, I don't think there is a real "normal".

 

I do think a social contract is a good idea. It sounds like your daughter needs more training on it though. She sounds like an intense kid who needs more independent time and also less rigid rules, more guidance on the reasons why things happen.

 

That said she may be policing because she is bored and disengaged, whereas policing is something she is able to accomplish. She probably gets non-devastating feedback, like a weary, "thank you but it wasn't disturbing me" at least, so she is encouraged.

 

This is a local school or a magnet school? Often, magnet/lottery schools are set up to attract and serve a very specific type of kid. Your kid doesn't fit this mold. We have a school that is beloved by most people that attend it. But I'm not sure it will serve my kid. We went to the informational night this evening. I am not so sure. On the one hand, she might have friends who attend. On the other hand, she is really big on the arts and might benefit from a larger program. On the other hand, she might benefit from being a bigger fish in a smaller pond.

 

Honestly, I don't know.

 

But confirmation bias is a real thing. Of course people who go there love the school. That's why they go there. It doesn't mean there is anything wrong with it not being for you. Nothing wrong with you, or the school. Except the online math, that's total crap.  :grouphug:  :leaving:



#30 eternalsummer

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Posted 11 January 2018 - 02:09 AM

I don't like the social contract idea - kids do this naturally, and should maybe or maybe not be encouraged to do it naturally, but to make it an overt method of classroom management imo breaks the natural bonds of classmates and sets some kids up as teacher's pets. etc.

 

That said, I'm sure it works well enough for the kids and parents who want to stay in the school.  I, personally, would run the other way.

 

Tsuga, it's a charter.  It's not magnet in that they can't exclude kids, but it's not exactly the neighborhood zoned either.  Our city has a lot of charters; they are all different, and some have great reputations but are not in reality good for all kids.  The "best" charter in the city, or one of them anyway, does almost all direct instruction at young ages and has (reportedly) hours of homework in early elementary.  I'm sure it's a great school for parents who want their kids to live like that, but it's not for me, kwim?

 

The OP is talking not about that charter but about another one (there are at least 15-20 in the area, I'd say).



#31 bethben

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Posted 11 January 2018 - 09:50 AM

We chose this charter because it is a neighborhood school and it’s two blocks from our house. My dd can walk there every day and actually have classmates in the neighborhood. The school we’re zoned for is worse academically, way overcrowded, and far away. The bus leaves at 7:45 am and gets back at 4:30. It’s a small country school that has been taken over by massive suburban growth. I just keep banging my head against the wall in frustration with our current school. Every time I get resigned about something I find that I dislike, they pop another one at me. This time, it looks like two weeks of assemblies (it takes about an hour each time) for a fund raiser that’s masking itself as character development. I’m finding it harder and harder to keep my opinions to myself and not have my dd know my frustration.


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Edited by bethben, 11 January 2018 - 10:27 AM.

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#32 Tsuga

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Posted 11 January 2018 - 11:12 AM

What does worse academically mean though? Challenging kids? More ESL students lowering test scores? My daughter is doing better in a school with lower scores. She is flourishing. It is because she is #1 in her class, a leader. She has gained confidence and more friends and has more time to relax and therefore, sleep (5th).

The bus ride sounds atrocious so I can see why you avoid it, but I think you are realizing that 'good education's does not necessarily = top scores or uniformity so maybe it is worth looking at the other school?
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#33 Heigh Ho

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Posted 13 January 2018 - 10:52 AM

I just don’t know if I can continue the public school route...I did get some answers. Basically, they can’t bring textbooks home 6th grade and up. And no, they don’t provide technology to access them at home either -that is up to the parents to provide. I’m not a fan of reading online for learning. There are too many studies out that show this type of learning to be inferior. I am a bad public school mom. The latest is my refusal to be pumped about a fundraiser that is taking away class time for two weeks so they can raise money for iPads and smart boards. I just can’t...maybe this is an indicator of the end of this.


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I think you aren't fitting the demographic...in my area the ipad and smartboard is seen as 'tech' that will bring the mainstream tech into the homes that don't have tech.  Ha ha. The poor here are city and have smart phones with subsidized data plans, and they hit the public wifi to get the homework done.  The just up from poor live rural and have nothing, since data is so expensive with no subsidy...its a tracphone with pay as you go, and they aren't paying to do hw nor are they driving the kid to a fast food joint to access free wifi.

 

Smart boards are so teachers do not have to have their back to the students or the door.  The time they use to spend at the board is now at the controls, facing the audience and entry/exit.

 

The fundraiser assembly is showing you that they don't have the funds or staff to bring in what you would expect for the assemblies.  They are also making the point that there is no such thing as a free lunch.

 

Student behavior problems that ask students to take para tasks in lieu of training the class to a quiet sign...I'd be in the principal's office determining if this is an individual teacher issue or a school wide pattern. Unacceptable....students should be focused on learning.  

 

Yep, not your demographic...gotta move on.


Edited by Heigh Ho, 13 January 2018 - 02:03 PM.

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#34 bethben

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Posted 13 January 2018 - 01:11 PM

I do understand the funding of charter schools is less and they need fundraisers to make up the difference. They did one last year for playground equipment. I’m also not liking how they are trying to get kids to sign up. They are giving out prizes for different things and making it a big award ceremony of sorts in their daily assemblies for the fundraiser. So, if you didn’t raise as much as the kid next to you, you won’t get the cool prizes and big ceremony with acknowledgement of what you accomplished. The last fundraiser had a big production of handing out special rubber ducks. Some kids who didn’t get as many as another kid went home crying.

So, I get the “why”. I’m just not in love with the “what”. This is a school that has smart boards in every class and feels the need for one in the area where kids are supposed to meet to get extra help or have some quiet time. They also have several iPad/chrome book carts for classroom use and a fully loaded classroom sized computer lab that’s takes up half the school library. I don’t believe all this technology contributes to a good education and I am seeing that the school believes otherwise. Also, the students policing other students is a school wide policy. They drill the mantras into the students as to why they’re supposed to do this. My daughter can rattle off the reasons in under 30 seconds.

So, we will be moving on. The path has become pretty clear their goals are not my goals. We have enrolled dd in a new charter school that is looking to be very classical in nature. Its the type of education that I feel personally I could support. It’s a lottery so we’ll see. If she doesn’t get that, homeschooling with a classical co-op is the other path. I just can’t continue with this school. My blood pressure can’t handle it.


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Edited by bethben, 13 January 2018 - 01:19 PM.

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#35 eternalsummer

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Posted 13 January 2018 - 04:48 PM

I do understand the funding of charter schools is less and they need fundraisers to make up the difference. They did one last year for playground equipment. I’m also not liking how they are trying to get kids to sign up. They are giving out prizes for different things and making it a big award ceremony of sorts in their daily assemblies for the fundraiser. So, if you didn’t raise as much as the kid next to you, you won’t get the cool prizes and big ceremony with acknowledgement of what you accomplished. The last fundraiser had a big production of handing out special rubber ducks. Some kids who didn’t get as many as another kid went home crying.

So, I get the “why”. I’m just not in love with the “what”. This is a school that has smart boards in every class and feels the need for one in the area where kids are supposed to meet to get extra help or have some quiet time. They also have several iPad/chrome book carts for classroom use and a fully loaded classroom sized computer lab that’s takes up half the school library. I don’t believe all this technology contributes to a good education and I am seeing that the school believes otherwise. Also, the students policing other students is a school wide policy. They drill the mantras into the students as to why they’re supposed to do this. My daughter can rattle off the reasons in under 30 seconds.

So, we will be moving on. The path has become pretty clear their goals are not my goals. We have enrolled dd in a new charter school that is looking to be very classical in nature. Its the type of education that I feel personally I could support. It’s a lottery so we’ll see. If she doesn’t get that, homeschooling with a classical co-op is the other path. I just can’t continue with this school. My blood pressure can’t handle it.


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The bolded I loathe and find absolutely unacceptable; that alone would have me running.

 

We did a charter in the Springs for a while that needed extra money but they were much cleverer about it, imo - part of their philosophy didn't really jive with having kids sell things (Waldorf).  So instead they ran classes for adults after school, did workshops, applied for grants for their garden, had parents supply a lot of things parents normally wouldn't supply (food for staff meetings, for instance), had a winter and spring festival where members of the community could sell things and would sometimes donate this or that or the proceeds, had a supply fee, etc.  They 100% didn't believe in technology, which did really help with ongoing costs - no need to upgrade the technology you don't have anyway. :)



#36 bethben

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Posted 13 January 2018 - 05:12 PM

They’ve done most of the above also...special lunches for teachers every quarter, bring cookies for the cookie walk for teachers (I’ve done this type of stuff), fundraisers whee kids sell things (the duck thing), fall festival, Christmas Santa run, and now the latest fun run. I’ve never had a problem with all the fundraisers. The only reason I have one now is because it’s taking up daily class time for two weeks.


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#37 Tsuga

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Posted 13 January 2018 - 11:26 PM

It sounds like you're making the right choice. Good luck on the lottery!