Jump to content


What's with the ads?

Photo
- - - - -

Flu Shot-Pros and Cons


56 replies to this topic

What's with the ads?

#1 AngelaG

AngelaG

    Hive Mind Queen Bee

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 1545 posts

Posted 08 September 2017 - 05:46 PM

I have never had a flu shot nor have I ever had the flu.  I am now in a position that requires the flu shot. What do I need to know about it and should I have any concerns or hesitancies?

Thanks!


  • Lanny likes this

#2 MotherGoose

MotherGoose

    Hive Mind Level 4 Worker: Builder Bee

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 2361 posts

Posted 08 September 2017 - 05:52 PM

I've never, nor has anyone I know, had complications from it besides a sore arm. My best friend from childhood, however, died from the flu two years ago. She wasn't vaccinated and was 42. So I get the shot for sure now, even though I was inconsistent before. I had the flu, the real, diagnosed flu, not a "stomach flu" or whatever, when I was 17. It was awful. I could not do anything hardly. I remember dropping an ice cube on th floor and thinking that it was just going to have to melt there because I couldn't pick it up. I can scarcely imagine how awful the flu would be on me now.
  • creekland, WoolySocks, umsami and 3 others like this

#3 Spryte

Spryte

    Hive Mind Queen Bee

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 9386 posts

Posted 08 September 2017 - 05:58 PM

If I could get the shot, I would. DS and I are both not supposed to get the shot, per our doc, though we'd benefit if we could.

Our family has had the flu multiple times. It's miserable. One year we had Flu A, Flu B and strep - at once. I was hospitalized. :(

Right now, DH and I are getting over actual flu. In the summer. :( Mine turned into pneumonia and I've been sick almost four weeks.

I would happily have the shot!
  • umsami and Lanny like this

#4 Spryte

Spryte

    Hive Mind Queen Bee

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 9386 posts

Posted 08 September 2017 - 05:59 PM

I've never, nor has anyone I know, had complications from it besides a sore arm. My best friend from childhood, however, died from the flu two years ago. She wasn't vaccinated and was 42. So I get the shot for sure now, even though I was inconsistent before. I had the flu, the real, diagnosed flu, not a "stomach flu" or whatever, when I was 17. It was awful. I could not do anything hardly. I remember dropping an ice cube on th floor and thinking that it was just going to have to melt there because I couldn't pick it up. I can scarcely imagine how awful the flu would be on me now.


Oh goodness, I'm so very sorry about your friend.
  • Lanny likes this

#5 Pawz4me

Pawz4me

    Hive Mind Level 6 Worker: Scout Bee

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 9187 posts

Posted 08 September 2017 - 06:00 PM

You might have a slightly sore arm from anywhere from an hour to a day. That's about it.

 

I'm sorry about your friend, MotherGoose. I've had the flu (not a virus I thought might be the flu) twice in my adult life. Both times were pretty horrendous. One of those times the whole family had it, and the boys were small then. It was a really bad time and I don't think we would have made it w/o my mom and MIL practically living with us for awhile.

 

(Edited because I'm apparently the queen of typos today. Sigh. ;))


Edited by Pawz4me, 08 September 2017 - 06:02 PM.


#6 Sadie

Sadie

    Beekeeping Professor

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 22284 posts

Posted 08 September 2017 - 06:09 PM

Sore arm. 

 

Plus, some years the vaccine is less effective than others. 

 

Having said that, I've been getting the vaccine for the last decade, and haven't gotten the flu. Two of my vaccinated kids did, last winter, but recovered relatively quickly. 

 

Here's some reliable info.

 

http://www.abc.net.a...portant/8436684

 

If you are not in one of the at risk groups, and you don't work with people who are, and you can afford time off if you are sick, and you won't go out into the community while sick...you might decide to skip it :)


Edited by Sadie, 08 September 2017 - 06:11 PM.

  • fralala likes this

#7 EKS

EKS

    Qualified Bee Keeper

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 14115 posts

Posted 08 September 2017 - 06:09 PM

I've been getting a flu shot every year for 15 or 20 years.  Like the other said, the only problem I've had is a sore arm.


  • Frances and mlktwins like this

#8 Garga

Garga

    Amateur Bee Keeper

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 9835 posts

Posted 08 September 2017 - 06:20 PM

I lived for 39 years and never got the flu.  

 

And then I got the flu.

 

Wow.  That illness will Knock You Out.  I felt like death warmed over.  I remember lying on the couch, too miserable to watch tv, and indulging in a few moans because I felt Just That Bad.  I felt too horrible to even keep my eyes on the screen.  I'd lie there just staring around the room, enduring.

 

I thought, "Well, that was a fluke."

 

And the next year, I got it again!  

 

Each time it lasted for over a week.  I was just glad I didn't have a job, because then I'd have pushed myself to get to work, but as a homeschooler I had the luxury of waiting until I was completely well before running around.

 

After that, I started getting flu shots.  I've gotten them for three years now.  This year will be my 4th (have an appointment in October.)

 

The first year it wasn't a big deal, though my arm was way more sore than I expected.  I later found out that you need to move the flu-shot arm a lot to help lessen the soreness.  The more still you keep the arm, the more sore it is.

 

The second year, I had some sort of reaction where I had a fever that made me feel pretty run down for the next day--I'd had the shot in the evening, woke up feeling drained and run down, and got better by around 4-ish.   

 

The third year, it was back to just the sore arm.

 

If you can, schedule the shot for just before you have a day off and if you get the fever reaction (which is a normal reaction from time to time), you don't have to try to work with a fever.



#9 KarenNC

KarenNC

    Amateur Bee Keeper

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 6289 posts

Posted 08 September 2017 - 06:21 PM

I've had no issues with it, and the shot is certainly preferable to the flu that sent me to the ER after throwing up every 15 min for 8+ hours, then high fever, etc and sick for days.


  • creekland and applethyme like this

#10 Ottakee

Ottakee

    Amateur Bee Keeper

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 10546 posts

Posted 08 September 2017 - 06:54 PM

We all get them. My girls have immune deficiencies and one has asthma. I had heart surgery, congestive heart failure and low lung capacity. I work with very vulnerable severely impaired students...
Think wheelchairs, tachs, tube feeds, etc.

We get the shot every year and have never had anything more than a sore arm.

My friend's son had a bone marrow transplant just over a year ago and he has very little immunity so everyone in close contact with him needs to be fully vaccinated.

#11 Pippen

Pippen

    Empress Bee

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 6156 posts

Posted 08 September 2017 - 06:59 PM

 I wasn't getting flu shots routinely until friends had a 10 yo girl die from influenza.  This was after a very short illness, and low grade fever--nothing you'd typically take a child to ER for. Also required after we had a family member become immune compromised due to chemo. 

 

I haven't had any problems besides a sore arm. 



#12 Bethany Grace

Bethany Grace

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 1122 posts

Posted 08 September 2017 - 07:05 PM

I've been getting them, along with everyone in my family for many years. The last time I had the actual flu was in 1995 when I didn't get a shot.

Slightly sore arm was only side effect from the shot.

#13 Kassia

Kassia

    Hive Mind Queen Bee

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 1496 posts

Posted 08 September 2017 - 07:05 PM

MotherGoose - I'm so sorry about your friend.  

 

We always get the flu shot.  My DH and dd will sometimes feel mildly ill a few days later (mostly mild body aches), the rest of us are fine other than a sore arm.  

 

I had the flu years ago when there was a shortage of the vaccine (2004?).  It was awful.  I thought I was dying.  I couldn't function at all.  It hit me quickly and I was alone with my youngest child.  We were upstairs and I couldn't get out of bed even though I knew she wasn't safe by the stairs.  Anyway, I don't want to ever feel that way again so I make sure I get the shot every year.  However, I am against requiring people to get it.  

 

 



#14 TeenagerMom

TeenagerMom

    Hive Mind Level 3 Worker: Honeymaking Bee

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 761 posts

Posted 08 September 2017 - 07:32 PM

I, personally, have not had good results from the shot.  I'm always down feeling horrible for a few days afterward.  Then every.single.darn time I still end up with the flu a couple of months down the road.  One time I almost ended up hospitalized.

 

The years I don't get the shot, I don't get the flu.  It's like the shot jinxes me. LOL.  So I only get it when it's required of me with my employment.

 

My kids never get the shot and have ended up with the flu a couple of times also.  Last last 2 times they had it, they were only sick for about 48 hours each.

 

My husband has NEVER had a shot and never had the flu, even when he went into hundreds of homes each year during flu season.  Butthead.



#15 lauraw4321

lauraw4321

    Hive Mind Royal Larvae

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 722 posts

Posted 08 September 2017 - 07:37 PM

I have had flu twice. Once when I had gotten the shot and once when I had not. I *always* get the shot now. I barely realized it was the flu and I was pregnant. When I got it without the shot I was much younger and seriously ill for over a week. If it hadn't been for my college roommate I would have ended up in the hospital, I'm sure.

Edited by lauraw4321, 08 September 2017 - 07:38 PM.


#16 MotherGoose

MotherGoose

    Hive Mind Level 4 Worker: Builder Bee

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 2361 posts

Posted 08 September 2017 - 07:40 PM

Thanks everyone for the condolences about my friend. It was shocking how quickly she died. I share the story to let folks know the flu is a serious illness that does kill people.
  • creekland and mumto2 like this

#17 WoolySocks

WoolySocks

    Googleplex master of hivedom

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 9027 posts

Posted 08 September 2017 - 07:40 PM

I never had the real full blown influenza virus until I had kids.  Pretty much every time one of us misses the shot, we get it.  I've never gotten even a mild version with the shot.  No side affect ever from the shots in any of the 4 of us.  It's a no brainer for us to get it.  We have elderly grandparents in our lives and friends with asthma, etc. 



#18 lllllll

lllllll

    Amateur Bee Keeper

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 4773 posts

Posted 08 September 2017 - 07:46 PM

nm


Edited by lllllll, 21 September 2017 - 11:35 AM.


#19 nixpix5

nixpix5

    Hive Mind Queen Bee

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 1177 posts

Posted 08 September 2017 - 07:57 PM

I get the shot each year as do my kids. Sore arm is all that I have ever experienced. I started after I got the legitimate flu one year (not the rotovirus that most people mistake as the flu). It was 10 days of the most miserable existence ever. Then the following year a 35 yo old co-worker died from it. He was healthy and not immune compromised. You better believe it changed my perspective.
  • creekland likes this

#20 nixpix5

nixpix5

    Hive Mind Queen Bee

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 1177 posts

Posted 08 September 2017 - 07:58 PM

I get the shot each year as do my kids. Sore arm is all that I have ever experienced. I started after I got the legitimate flu one year (not the rotovirus that most people mistake as the flu). It was 10 days of the most miserable existence ever. Then the following year a 35 yo old co-worker died from the flu. He was healthy and not immune compromised. You better believe it changed my perspective so hence yearly flu shots for all.

#21 luuknam

luuknam

    Think before you arithmetic

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 6151 posts

Posted 08 September 2017 - 10:20 PM

This year, I didn't even have a sore arm. I think most of the other times I did have a sore arm for a little bit. 

 

I've only had the flu verified once - $50 for the privilege of knowing it was indeed the flu, but that was the only way to get Tamiflu... doc wouldn't prescribe just based on symptoms. Tamiflu makes it last 1-2 days shorter or so, and was like $100 OOP. The flu shot is free with my current insurance (realistically, Tamiflu's probably only $10 with my current insurance as well... not 100% sure). Anyway, I'm in a high risk group so I got the flu once every 2-3 years (not counting every other respiratory illness that goes around) before I decided that I've had the flu often enough to last a life time and have gotten the shot every year since (i.e. I think I've had the flu shot 6 times now?). So, yeah, I still get every common cold, but I haven't had the flu since... no going from fine to having a serious fever, extreme muscle aches, etc in just a few minutes time, and then being sick for 2 weeks. 

 

The kids don't get the flu shot, because in NY minors have to go to their ped to get vaccinated. I'm not driving 40 min roundtrip for a flu shot. I get mine at Target. 



#22 Lady Florida.

Lady Florida.

    New again (old) avatar. Same old me.

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 12553 posts

Posted 08 September 2017 - 10:33 PM

Unless you have an allergy to an ingredient or some other specific medical reason why you can't get the flu shot, there is no downside. The upside is that it will likely keep you from getting the flu but if you do get it you'll get a milder version.

 

MotherGoose I'm very sorry about your friend. A high school friend of mine lost her husband to the flu when he was 47.

 

The flu kills. It even kills healthy people in the prime of life. Get the shot. 


  • Frances, creekland, MotherGoose and 3 others like this

#23 onelittlemonkey

onelittlemonkey

    I'm not superstitious, but I am a little stitious. -MGS

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 1350 posts

Posted 08 September 2017 - 11:08 PM

Ds16 and I have been getting it yearly since his diabetes diagnosis at age 10. No side effects and hardly ever even a sore arm. Dh still won't get it. The year he did, he got the flu, so that did it for him. 🙄

#24 CPSTAnne

CPSTAnne

    Hive Mind Level 3 Worker: Honeymaking Bee

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 1327 posts

Posted 08 September 2017 - 11:13 PM

I didn't get them before kids or while oldest was young. Then when she was a couple months shy of 3 she and I both got H1N1. She was hospitalized for 3 days and I was so sick I couldn't even go to see her. It. Was. Horrible. We all get the flu shot now. The girls and I got them yesterday. My arm is still sore but that's about it. 



#25 PinkyandtheBrains.

PinkyandtheBrains.

    Hive Mind Worker Bee

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 6775 posts

Posted 08 September 2017 - 11:18 PM


Con- sore arm

Pro- less severe flu if you do catch it
Pro - less chance to spread it

I wish I could get it.
  • Lady Florida. likes this

#26 Lanny

Lanny

    Powered by Banana Splits

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 6859 posts

Posted 08 September 2017 - 11:27 PM

I have never had a flu shot nor have I ever had the flu. I am now in a position that requires the flu shot. What do I need to know about it and should I have any concerns or hesitancies?
Thanks!

You will probably be perfectly fine. My wife could tell you about the time many years ago that I got the flu as a reaction to the vaccine. That had never happened to me before when I got a Flu shot. If your job requires don't worry about it.

Sent from my SM-G355M using Tapatalk

#27 gardenmom5

gardenmom5

    Amateur Bee Keeper

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 19437 posts

Posted 08 September 2017 - 11:49 PM

I've had a flu shot twice - both times with a compromised immune system.  the first time - I had the flu that season. I'm convinced it was not as bad as it could have been.  (and I was almost as sick as I'd ever been.)  I had no medical insurance - but am positive if I hadn't had the shot, I would have required hospitalization.  the 2nd time I was pg - and the vaccine was scarce. my dr couldn't get it, and I was turned away at one flu clinic because they refused to immunize pg women.  the one where I did finally get the shot - they were hesitant, and made me sign waivers.  but I had had pneumonia that year, on top  of being pg. 

 

dh used to get the shot every year.  no problem.  and 2dd works in a hospital - so she has to have it every year, and has never had an issue.



#28 Liz CA

Liz CA

    Apprentice Bee Keeper

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 12900 posts

Posted 08 September 2017 - 11:54 PM

Some issues have been around the medium in which the serum is stored.

Another issue is that there are so many strains of flu and and the vaccine only addresses a few.


  • MercyA and Squiddles like this

#29 maize

maize

    Maizgyver

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 18093 posts

Posted 08 September 2017 - 11:55 PM

I get it every year, no complications.

I had the flu three years ago--only time in my adult life I have been flat on my back for 48 hours. It took months to fully recover. The flu shot that year ended up not being a good match for the circulating strains.

#30 transientChris

transientChris

    Bee Keeper

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 10402 posts

Posted 09 September 2017 - 02:44 AM

Both dh and I have been getting flu shots for more than 30 years.  Neither of us have had flu since we got the shots.  My children have also been getting the flu shots all there lives and also haven't gotten the flu.  Since I have a triple reason to get the flu shot (Asthma, on immune suppresents, and another disease that makes it more likely that the flu will be worse for me) I always have to get one.  My youngest has severe asthma and also has to get one.  My other two and my son in law get them because of the two of us plus they don't want to get sick like that either,  Dh was in the military so he always got one and has continued to get one even as he is retired.  We see good reasons to not risk hospitalizations, death or even two weeks of feeling horrible.  If we can avoid that- yippee.  None of us have ever had any worse reaction then sore arm and maybe feeling a bit sickish on the day or day after but not really sick.  


  • Frances likes this

#31 Laura Corin

Laura Corin

    She who plants flowers for bees

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 23420 posts

Posted 09 September 2017 - 03:00 AM

Agreeing with others.  The flu is no fun, even without complications.  We all get the shot for our own sakes and also to protect my mum, who is frail and would be really miserable if she got the flu.  

 

Even leaving aside the suffering, flu is just very disruptive - you can't do anything, including looking after children, going to work, managing the house.

 

The most we have had from the jab (even my elderly mother) is a slightly sore arm.


  • Lady Florida. likes this

#32 fralala

fralala

    Hive Mind Royal Larvae

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 733 posts

Posted 09 September 2017 - 05:59 AM

No ill effects. Given the fact that this particular vaccine is relatively ineffective-- I believe it offers full protection to a little over half of the people who get it-- I, like pretty much everyone else here, am strongly motivated to encourage you (and the rest of the herd) to get it. For those who are skeptical of modern pharmaceutical companies and doctors (like my parents, who will only see a naturopath) I find it helpful to think of this vaccine as naturally boosting one's own immunity to several strains of the flu and preventing the need for (potential) greater medical intervention.

 

The only one of us who has ever suffered side effects is my child (maybe 2 or 3 at the time?), who once got the Flumist and spent a week afterward with bad cold symptoms, which certainly were not a full-blown flu and may have been mere coincidence, but may have been related to the live vaccine (which she has gotten since, with no issues). In our family, though, there is some evidence among the adult population that if you think the vaccine is going to give you the flu, you feel a little extra tired and achy for a few days afterward. I think it's normal to harbor some concern about being poked and injected with a foreign substance.



#33 amo_mea_filiis.

amo_mea_filiis.

    Empress Bee

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 7071 posts

Posted 09 September 2017 - 06:23 AM

We get the shot. We first started getting it because of ds's asthma.

Last year left got a bit hectic and I never got around to getting my shot.

I had flu in January and it was "only" flu B, which isn't as bad. And it was bad! I had a high fever and couldn't get off the couch for 2 days. The rest of the time was still bad, but not literally stuck on the couch.

For those allergic to some ingredients, an allergist can give the vaccine in broken doses and many are able to tolerate it.

#34 regentrude

regentrude

    Qualified Bee Keeper

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 25387 posts

Posted 09 September 2017 - 07:04 AM

No ill effects here.

The one year there was a vaccine shortage and I could not get the shot, I got the flu. I was very sick and then weak for weeks, definitely not an experience I care to repeat.



#35 G5052

G5052

    Retired Homeschool Mom -- they're in college!

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 9200 posts

Posted 09 September 2017 - 07:11 AM

I have asthma, so I get it. I have a physical scheduled for Friday, so I'll probably just get it then.

 



#36 KeriJ

KeriJ

    Hive Mind Level 4 Worker: Builder Bee

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 1198 posts

Posted 09 September 2017 - 07:39 AM

The only time in the last 10 years my family and I have had the full blown flu was the year we got the shot. Who knows why. But that's our experience.

#37 LarlaB

LarlaB

    Hive Mind Queen Bee

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 1374 posts

Posted 09 September 2017 - 08:30 AM

Only one of us has ever had the flu- DS had flu and Strep at the same time, 3 years ago. no one else had either.

No shots in our household. Thankfully no flu either.

#38 reefgazer

reefgazer

    Apprentice Bee Keeper

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 5845 posts

Posted 09 September 2017 - 12:29 PM

My DH get s flu shot every year, but he won't get the mist because it makes him sick.

No ill effects. Given the fact that this particular vaccine is relatively ineffective-- I believe it offers full protection to a little over half of the people who get it-- I, like pretty much everyone else here, am strongly motivated to encourage you (and the rest of the herd) to get it. For those who are skeptical of modern pharmaceutical companies and doctors (like my parents, who will only see a naturopath) I find it helpful to think of this vaccine as naturally boosting one's own immunity to several strains of the flu and preventing the need for (potential) greater medical intervention.

 

The only one of us who has ever suffered side effects is my child (maybe 2 or 3 at the time?), who once got the Flumist and spent a week afterward with bad cold symptoms, which certainly were not a full-blown flu and may have been mere coincidence, but may have been related to the live vaccine (which she has gotten since, with no issues). In our family, though, there is some evidence among the adult population that if you think the vaccine is going to give you the flu, you feel a little extra tired and achy for a few days afterward. I think it's normal to harbor some concern about being poked and injected with a foreign substance.

 



#39 MSNative

MSNative

    Hive Mind Queen Bee

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 3144 posts

Posted 09 September 2017 - 04:19 PM

My father ended up in the hospital after a flu shot.  I had an anaphylactic reaction to it.  Not sure what's in it that we are allergic to cause we get all the other vaccines.  My family does not get the flu shot.  Ive had the flu once.  No one else in my family has.



#40 Kassia

Kassia

    Hive Mind Queen Bee

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 1496 posts

Posted 09 September 2017 - 04:46 PM

My DH get s flu shot every year, but he won't get the mist because it makes him sick.

 

My three sons got the mist the year there was a vaccine shortage for the shot and one of my sons ended up with mild flu symptoms that I assume were from the mist.  



#41 Ali in OR

Ali in OR

    Hive Mind Queen Bee

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 5449 posts

Posted 09 September 2017 - 06:31 PM

We have all gotten flu shots since oldest got the flu at age 2 and had a seizure that we couldn't stop. I was thrilled when I went to the doctor yesterday for another reason and found out that they already have their flu shots available--got that and the pneumonia one. On that one he said that it doesn't seem to reduce your likelihood of getting pneumonia, but it does help keep you out of the hospital if you get it. I got them both in one arm and it was very sore overnight--couldn't sleep on it. But much better than getting the flu.


  • mumto2 and Kassia like this

#42 creekland

creekland

    Retired homeschooler!

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 23205 posts

Posted 09 September 2017 - 07:00 PM

Never had the flu.  Started getting the shot three years ago now and plan to get it every year from now on.  Why?  No reason not to.  My body is getting older so I might as well give it all the help I can AND I was told three years ago that I could be a carrier even if I don't get it.  I don't want to give that to anyone.

 

No regrets.  I substitute teach and follow right behind teachers who are out and there are often students who go home sick with the flu.  I've always been exposed to it via school (for the past 18 years anyway), but still, no regrets adding the shot to my annual plans.

 

Speaking of which... shall see about getting it sometime this coming week...

 

I've been told it's most effective to get it in the morning and be active that day (going for a walk right afterward or something).  I work that into my schedule too.

 

I've never had any side effects - not even a sore arm.  If I get it in my right arm, I don't even feel the shot.  (My left arm is more sensitive apparently.)


Edited by creekland, 09 September 2017 - 09:18 PM.

  • Lady Florida. likes this

#43 maize

maize

    Maizgyver

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 18093 posts

Posted 09 September 2017 - 09:14 PM

My three sons got the mist the year there was a vaccine shortage for the shot and one of my sons ended up with mild flu symptoms that I assume were from the mist.


Yes, we all had mild respiratory symptoms the year we got flumist.

#44 applethyme

applethyme

    Hive Mind Level 2 Worker: Nurse Bee

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 1036 posts

Posted 09 September 2017 - 10:42 PM

Our immediate family gets the flu shot yearly because ds has severe asthma.  

 

My inlaws thought we were crazy for yearly flu shots.  Last year MIL had what she thought was a cold.  Was congested for a couple of days and had a fever.  On a Monday she felt a little short of breath and went to the hosptial.  We got the call 6am Tuesday morning that she had died from complications of the flu. She had not even told her children she was in the hospital because she thought it was just an overnight stay and she would feel better the next day.  



#45 happypamama

happypamama

    Hive Mind Queen Bee

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 9343 posts

Posted 10 September 2017 - 05:12 AM

I used to get the flu shot, but one year (2003), I didn't, and I got what certainly must have been the flu, and I was terribly sick for a couple of days. The following year, I would have gotten it, but there was a shortage. I had two major risk factors, asthma and being pregnant, and I was still deemed unimportant enough to get the shot. No flu. I stopped trying to get the shot after that. No flu. No problems. Then we all got flu A (confirmed) in April 2016. DH and I were sick like death for about two days, and then it took another four or five days before we felt back to normal. The kids got sick too, but I don't recall them being as sick. I didn't get a shot last fall/winter because I was pregnant. I haven't decided about this year yet though.

#46 Katy

Katy

    Hive Mind Level 6 Worker: Scout Bee

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 6546 posts

Posted 10 September 2017 - 03:11 PM

First of all, if someone was throwing up every 15 minutes they didn't have Influenza.  They may have had one of several other viruses that cause what is classically referred to as "stomach flu," but they didn't have anything that would have been prevented by the flu shot. The flu can cause limited vomiting, but mostly in children, and not to the severity of stomach flu.

 

It turns out that many "colds" are actually mild cases of the flu.  The classic flu - bad cold symptoms combined with full body aches and a high fever that can in rare cases turn rapidly into pneumonia and death is what the flu shot is designed to prevent.

 

I worked nursing during the H1N1 (Swine flu) epidemic. All staff at my hospital was required to have both the swine flu shot and the regular flu shot that year. One of them was called "a bad batch" and over a third of the employees had neurological symptoms afterwards - which for me personally meant months and months of strange sensations like feeling cold water pouring down the outside of one leg, pins and needles, and other symptoms that are generally signs of MS. As a result, I can never get another flu shot.  After the epidemic of medical issues at the hospital, staff was informed that the flu wasn't that big of a deal anyway, and most CDC reported "flu" deaths are actually bacterial pneumonia that have NOTHING to do with the influenza virus. Obviously that doesn't reduce the pain for those whose children died of the flu, but most people who have that sort of complication actually have other immune issues.

 

And with the exception of one foster child with unique medical issues that we plan to adopt, I don't vaccinate our kids for the flu either.  Not that I never would, but I prefer to wait to give them shots when there is a dangerous epidemic, NOT to prevent every little sniffle. A week or two in bed with the fever is bad, but in my mind it's more dangerous to not be able to get the shot when there's an epidemic.  Obviously the equation changes when we add in the factor of immune issues.

 

Anyway, for most people the flu shot is no big deal.  I simply have personally known enough people with bad reactions that I avoid them for everyone when it seems wise to do so. Immune issues or jobs that require it change the equation about what is wise by quite a bit.


  • OH_Homeschooler, lllllll, happypamama and 1 other like this

#47 Janeway

Janeway

    Amateur Bee Keeper

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 3653 posts

Posted 10 September 2017 - 04:42 PM

The only years anyone can in my home got the flu was the years we got the shots. We stopped getting the shots, and the flu.

#48 ScoutTN

ScoutTN

    Hive Mind Queen Bee

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 7190 posts

Posted 10 September 2017 - 04:45 PM

The only con I know of is that the kids' shot used to be (is it still?) in two doses. That meant two trips to the ped, a week apart. My kids got the flu twice, the years we went to the ped's office for the vax! Always a wait there, even for just shots.

Our pharmacies have only had the adult shot, but now urgent care has the kids' one too. They are quick and I can make a 7:00 am appt to be in and out before anyone sick gets there. Dh works for a health care company and gets his at work.

Edited by ScoutTN, 10 September 2017 - 04:47 PM.


#49 KarenNC

KarenNC

    Amateur Bee Keeper

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 6289 posts

Posted 10 September 2017 - 06:03 PM

First of all, if someone was throwing up every 15 minutes they didn't have Influenza.  They may have had one of several other viruses that cause what is classically referred to as "stomach flu," but they didn't have anything that would have been prevented by the flu shot. The flu can cause limited vomiting, but mostly in children, and not to the severity of stomach flu.

 

It turns out that many "colds" are actually mild cases of the flu.  The classic flu - bad cold symptoms combined with full body aches and a high fever that can in rare cases turn rapidly into pneumonia and death is what the flu shot is designed to prevent.

 

I worked nursing during the H1N1 (Swine flu) epidemic. All staff at my hospital was required to have both the swine flu shot and the regular flu shot that year. One of them was called "a bad batch" and over a third of the employees had neurological symptoms afterwards - which for me personally meant months and months of strange sensations like feeling cold water pouring down the outside of one leg, pins and needles, and other symptoms that are generally signs of MS. As a result, I can never get another flu shot.  After the epidemic of medical issues at the hospital, staff was informed that the flu wasn't that big of a deal anyway, and most CDC reported "flu" deaths are actually bacterial pneumonia that have NOTHING to do with the influenza virus. Obviously that doesn't reduce the pain for those whose children died of the flu, but most people who have that sort of complication actually have other immune issues.

 

And with the exception of one foster child with unique medical issues that we plan to adopt, I don't vaccinate our kids for the flu either.  Not that I never would, but I prefer to wait to give them shots when there is a dangerous epidemic, NOT to prevent every little sniffle. A week or two in bed with the fever is bad, but in my mind it's more dangerous to not be able to get the shot when there's an epidemic.  Obviously the equation changes when we add in the factor of immune issues.

 

Anyway, for most people the flu shot is no big deal.  I simply have personally known enough people with bad reactions that I avoid them for everyone when it seems wise to do so. Immune issues or jobs that require it change the equation about what is wise by quite a bit.

 

You would have to argue the influenza diagnosis with the hospital emergency room doctors who actually examined me at the time. I went in thinking I had food poisoning but they told me it was influenza. I had begun the more characteristic high fever and other symptoms while there. Ironically, I didn't throw up at all after that extended bout, though I had all the other symptoms. I guess I got the "deluxe" package. ;) I was about 22 at the time.


Edited by KarenNC, 10 September 2017 - 06:07 PM.


#50 luuknam

luuknam

    Think before you arithmetic

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 6151 posts

Posted 11 September 2017 - 09:18 PM

The only con I know of is that the kids' shot used to be (is it still?) in two doses. That meant two trips to the ped, a week apart. 

 

 

I didn't know that the kids' flu shot was 2 doses at some point. Mine have had the flu shot only once or twice or so in their lives, and it definitely was a single dose. I also opted for the actual shot, not the nasal spray or w/e, so who knows... but anyway... just one shot. Just with the hassle of driving 40 min, and then the debatable safety merits of 40 min in the car vs potentially getting the flu... meh. 


  • ScoutTN likes this