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Beast Academy for Afterschooling?


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#1 Ordinary Shoes

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Posted 26 August 2017 - 10:11 AM

BA 2nd grade is about to be published. We haven't done too much math afterschooling in the last year because DD's school does a good job with math and DD has always been a strong math student despite claiming that she doesn't like math.

 

Do any of you use BA for afterschooling? How much time does it take? Do your kids really think that it is fun?

 

 



#2 SarahW

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Posted 26 August 2017 - 10:49 AM

BA is great for afterschooling. It's different enough to not feel like "more of the same" and teaches things ordinary math curriculum leaves out.

 

We do about 2 pages a day, more or less. Usually each subtopic is a two page spread, so I try to chunk it that way. But if there's a lot of starred problems, especially towards the ends of a chapter, we might just do one page.

 

I try to keep it in the ballpark of 20 mins.

 

This does not include the guide books. My kid reads those on his own (he likes them).


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#3 Ordinary Shoes

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Posted 04 November 2017 - 12:07 PM

Update here - we've had 2A for about a month. I'm disappointed in it. It seems to be below DD's level. 

 

Is anyone here disappointed by 2A? 

 

Should I move on to 3A? 

 

DD thinks BA is fun. She likes the monsters. But she told me that it was really easy and she already knows what they are covering. 

 

 



#4 nature girl

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Posted 04 November 2017 - 01:04 PM

I've used 2A a bit with DD7. It's simple, yes, but I've done a few problems on weekends to keep math fun for her. And she loves the Guide Book, finished it the first day we got it. I've mostly had her do the challenge problems, and they're interesting enough to keep her engaged, while not hard enough to get her frustrated. But my philosophy has always been that there's benefit in doing problems somewhat below their level, to cement concepts and boost their self-esteem.

 

Our situation is different, though. I'm doing this mostly because I don't like the math they're doing in school, it's pretty rudimentary and repetitive, and she's bored out of her skull. So I've been using this to reinforce to her that math can be like puzzles.

 

We have 3A as well, and do the opposite there, the regular problems are at about the right level but I'm not trying the challenge problems because she gets easily frustrated (she has ADHD) and I want her to keep her enjoyment of the program...Saving those for this summer.


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#5 Ordinary Shoes

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Posted 04 November 2017 - 01:46 PM

Thanks. DD is finally liking math this year although I think it is not that challenging for her. The teacher has told them to rate themselves as 1 to 4 based on their understanding of the concept. 1 is not understanding at all and 4 is able to teach it to another student. DD says she's at 4 for math every day but she says she is having fun. 

 

I'm not that concerned about her not being challenged right now because she finally claims to like math. 

 

Her school uses Math in Focus (Singapore based) so I'm happy with the curriculum. 

 

 


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#6 Earthmerlin

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Posted 04 November 2017 - 06:58 PM

Thanks. DD is finally liking math this year although I think it is not that challenging for her. The teacher has told them to rate themselves as 1 to 4 based on their understanding of the concept. 1 is not understanding at all and 4 is able to teach it to another student. DD says she's at 4 for math every day but she says she is having fun.

I'm not that concerned about her not being challenged right now because she finally claims to like math.

Her school uses Math in Focus (Singapore based) so I'm happy with the curriculum.

I completely agree with building & maintaining math confidence at this age (esp. with girls, who tend to turn off to math early in life [unfortunately]). My 3rd grader regained her love of math last year (in 2nd) after having an inept 1st grade teacher but an enthusiastic math-loving one in 2nd. I have since then learned that positive self-image goes far for a budding mathematician.

We are a "mathy" family & so supplement her (math) education through read alouds, games, conversation & introducing new topics. I have BA3 but have yet to use it (she thinks the monsters are unappealing--seriously?) but I personally like what I see. For now, I take an eclectic approach & pull from several sources. We answer questions & keep the dialogue & thinking going, which is top priority at this point.

Edited by Earthmerlin, 04 November 2017 - 07:01 PM.

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#7 Have kids -- will travel

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Posted 05 November 2017 - 10:00 PM

I looked at BA2 for my six-year-old, and it also seemed like the wrong level (too easy). If you like the BA approach and she's enjoying it, I'd finish up BA2 and then move to BA3. Have you given her the BA3 placement test?

 

We also have mathy boys, not particularly challenged by school but very positive about math at school. As a result, we do some simple mathy things at home without a full-on curriculum. Bedtime math is fun. Spatial puzzles and games are fun. We have a few math games the boys really enjoy as well.

 

I'm probably going to get BA2 for my younger one and BA3 for my older one some time next year. My hope is to have it fun and somewhat challenging, but mostly fun.


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#8 Have kids -- will travel

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Posted 05 November 2017 - 10:01 PM

I'm also considering buying the guides but not the workbooks and letting the kids do BA online. It all depends on what's being offered.



#9 Lace

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Posted 06 November 2017 - 12:57 AM

I afterschool my 8yo with Beast Academy off and on.  He likes it more than what he's doing in school, but he's also very easily frustrated by the challenging problems.  We work on it when he's interested, so it's hard to say how much time it takes.  He'll stick to it for several days or weeks, then set it aside for days or weeks.  It took him almost 2 years to do BA 3, but it's looking likely he'll finish BA 4 in about a calendar year.

 

My DS#3 did BA 2A, and yes, it was very easy for him.  However, he took twice as long on the second half of the practice book as he spent on the first half, so I'd say it gets more challenging as it goes along.  He really liked the third chapter.

 

I vote you let your DD finish 2A and then give 3A a try.  You could still go back to 2B when it's released in Feb/Mar.  I'm guessing that 2B will be more challenging than 2A, since 2A is basically starting from scratch and the 2 series is supposed to get a child ready for level 3 by the end of it.


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