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Question on teaching handwriting


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#1 nwahomeschoolmom

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Posted 17 August 2017 - 10:03 PM

So we started doing official "Kindergarten" at the very beginning of August to get a head start since we have a baby on the way.  My son is just over 5.  We did some handwriting last school year as well and my son writes a lot, often for fun, but his general handwriting is a sloppy mix of huge capital letters and a few lowercase from time to time.  

 

He seems to be doing well with what we are using for print, Getty Dubay Italic level B.  He is finally started to gain confidence with lowercase a's and is gaining more confidence with lowercase all around.  We are also doing Writing With Ease Level 1.  So with both of those things he is having to use correct capitalization.  He really resisted at first, but its working for the most part.  My question is at what point should I require him to use correct capitalization all the time?  For example, for all other writing, he still writes really fast in mostly capital letters, like phonics workbook pages, spelling dictations, etc.   

 

Thanks in advance!

 

 



#2 alibild

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Posted 17 August 2017 - 11:30 PM

Both my boys prefer to write in all caps. My current 5th grader, when he was probably 3rd grade, I only made him go back and correct when he did his dictation for AAS or his handwriting. We made it a game-he wrote his dictation, and I would circle all the things he needed to correct-we did this on whiteboard-then he would correct it. Finally, about the last couple months of 4th grade, was when he was able to, by habit, write in lower case where needed. However, he often had a problem making his little letters, like the lowercase "a", stay in it's spot, he would often make it larger and stick out over the line. So, we were really working on 2 issues at once.

 

I'm finding my going into 2nd grader is on the same track. When I write something for him to copy (usually when he asks how to spell something), I write it in lowercase, and he "translates" it into upper case where he's more comfortable writing. So, we'll probably have to do the same things with him.

 

This may or may not help, but I'm just saying this is our journey, and it's not unusual for  k'er to write in all caps. 



#3 nixpix5

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Posted 17 August 2017 - 11:55 PM

I put my k twins last year on Handwriting without Tears grade 1. We mainly just used the chalkboard lessons for correct formation and orientation. Worked like a charm. They wanted to make lowercase letters after that. They especially loved making the "magic c" letters.

#4 Ellie

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Posted 18 August 2017 - 06:42 AM

So we started doing official "Kindergarten" at the very beginning of August to get a head start since we have a baby on the way.  My son is just over 5.  We did some handwriting last school year as well and my son writes a lot, often for fun, but his general handwriting is a sloppy mix of huge capital letters and a few lowercase from time to time.  

 

He seems to be doing well with what we are using for print, Getty Dubay Italic level B.  He is finally started to gain confidence with lowercase a's and is gaining more confidence with lowercase all around.  We are also doing Writing With Ease Level 1.  So with both of those things he is having to use correct capitalization.  He really resisted at first, but its working for the most part.  My question is at what point should I require him to use correct capitalization all the time?  For example, for all other writing, he still writes really fast in mostly capital letters, like phonics workbook pages, spelling dictations, etc.   

 

Thanks in advance!

 

He should write everything in lower case, know the rules for upper case, and only use upper case when appropriate: at the beginning of a sentence, and proper nouns.


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#5 HomeAgain

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Posted 18 August 2017 - 07:20 AM

I agree with Ellie.  We didn't do much writing at all in K, but what writing we did I made sure it was done correctly to reinforce the rules.  We'd go over specific points to keep in mind before he started writing each day to help him remember.  In your shoes I'd probably cut back the amount of pencil work until it was consistent.


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#6 ExcitedMama

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Posted 18 August 2017 - 09:16 AM

How is his letter formation? WWE sounds very advanced for a 5 year old. My 5 year olds are usually practicing letter formation and consistency. Even my 7 year old has problems consistently writing his letters uniformly and properly sized when copying WWE. I would be concerned about creating bad habits if he is allowed to continue to write with the wrong mix of upper and lowercase letters. I usually emphasize less writing but more quality. I want to work on better muscle memory. I really liked Memoria Press First Start Reading workbooks, you don't need the teacher's guide. They work on phonics through gradually increasing writing exercises. At first it's tracing bubble letter words and it moves up from there. It might be a fun way to work on consistency with writing and proper sizing.

#7 nwahomeschoolmom

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Posted 18 August 2017 - 10:06 AM

Thanks for the input!  Yes, he is a bit advanced..I often post on the Accelerated Forum, but he is not that advanced in handwriting (maybe he is, I'm not sure.)  Last night, before bed he wrote two full page agendas in smallish lettering for what he planned to do on Friday and Saturday (half spelled incorrectly of course).  So my son enjoys writing and writes a lot on his own.  Yesterday, the WWE1 lesson was too old for him (Rumpelstilskin) and I said we would skip it and he nearly cried and created his own narration to do.  So yeah, I'm trying to deal with his asynchronous development without creating bad handwriting habits.   So I can't really cut back on the pencil work because he enjoys it and asks for it and even writes when he doesn't have to....


Edited by nwahomeschoolmom, 18 August 2017 - 10:40 AM.


#8 EKT

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Posted 18 August 2017 - 11:06 AM

For all of our written school work (in any subject), I always require proper spelling, capitalization, etc. So, for WWE, I always make sure my girls' copywork sentences are exactly like the model sentences, as far as spelling, capitalization, and punctuation go. (Copying the sentence exactly as it appears is the point, after all, so the student learns proper conventions.) I am also very adamant that they form their letters properly (starting at the top, etc.) so they do not develop any bad habits. (I always physically watch them do their WWE copywork.) Basically, for any writing that is specifically for school, I emphasize the rules they have learned and always expect "best effort" work. 

 

But for any of their independent free writing (list and scribbles and stories I find around the house, etc.)--I consider that play and I would never correct it. I think of it this way: I have my own writing quirks, so my children are entitled to some as well. For instance, I always fill out forms at the doctor's in all caps, because I personally think that looks neater on a form even if it's not "correct." Likewise, the shopping lists I scribble in my bullet journal are most certainly not my best handwriting, and I would find it obnoxious if anyone commented on my penmanship in that context. But anything I might write for an academic or professional purpose, I would absolutely make sure the grammar, spelling, capitalization, and punctuation are correct. So, I try to hold my children to those same standards. (I think context is really important.) 


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#9 homeschoolkitty

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Posted 18 August 2017 - 10:00 PM

I had a very advanced reader (3yr old) but writing I didn't worry about as I thought her muscles had to catch up, etc. so I did not correct the bad habits that she still has. I would suggest to you to go through the pains now to correct, as the time passes the bad habit cement in the "muscle memory of the child"