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"Hey! I have enough credits to be a senior! Let's change my grade level!"


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#1 Chanley

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Posted 12 August 2017 - 07:08 PM

So my dd was born in late Sept. I never put a grade on our schoolwork until around 8th grade. I "red shirted" her when I was forced to put a grade on a PSAT. She took several high school level courses in the 8th grade at WTMA. Anyway, long story short...her 12th grade year was going to be full of fun DE classes at the local CC and some tougher APs to round out her portfolio and perhaps give her another year to boost SAT/ACT scores. 

 

So she comes to me tonight and says, what do you think about calling this my senior year and me graduating in 2018.  She has more than enough credits to do this. 

 

Folks, I think I am going to have a heart attack. I know she is mature enough to handle being a senior and leaving next year. This rushes applications and essays. I like to plan things 8-12 months in advance. Seriously, you should see my planner. All of this makes me feel dizzy. 

 

She spent the summer studying for the SAT, about 2 hours a day. She has worked hard and is so ready to leave this small town that we live in. 

 

 

What does the hive mind think about this?

(Sorry this is disjointed, I am reeling.)



#2 JudoMom

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Posted 12 August 2017 - 07:22 PM

Does she have a plan?  How does she feel about rushing essays, etc.?  Will it impact any scholarship opportunities (if that's important)?  

I'd sit down with her and discuss the pros and cons and make some lists and decide what to do from there. 


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#3 Chanley

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Posted 12 August 2017 - 07:26 PM

This kid always has a plan. She came to me with her transcript completely reworked. We discussed pros and cons, she looked into moving her test dates around and she already had college application deadlines, testing deadlines etc...on a spreadsheet. 

 

 


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#4 SKL

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Posted 12 August 2017 - 07:33 PM

I would let her do it.


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#5 JudoMom

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Posted 12 August 2017 - 07:35 PM

This kid always has a plan. She came to me with her transcript completely reworked. We discussed pros and cons, she looked into moving her test dates around and she already had college application deadlines, testing deadlines etc...on a spreadsheet. 

 

It sounds like she's ready.   :grouphug:


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#6 wapiti

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Posted 12 August 2017 - 07:36 PM

It sounds like it's a go :)

 

My only concern would be whether her transcript is competitive enough for her college goals.  It sounds like you've already discussed that.


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#7 regentrude

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Posted 12 August 2017 - 08:48 PM

Why not if she is ready?

 This

 

This kid always has a plan. She came to me with her transcript completely reworked. We discussed pros and cons, she looked into moving her test dates around and she already had college application deadlines, testing deadlines etc...on a spreadsheet. 

sounds just like my DD. She went away to college at 17 and is doing extremely well.


Edited by regentrude, 12 August 2017 - 08:50 PM.

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#8 Chanley

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Posted 12 August 2017 - 08:59 PM

It sounds like it's a go :)

 

My only concern would be whether her transcript is competitive enough for her college goals.  It sounds like you've already discussed that.

 

This is really the only con, except I thought I had another year to figure things out financially! Everybody would have a better transcript with another year for more dual enrollment classes and AP classes and test prep. So yeah, that is a given. 

 

*deep sigh* She seems so much happier with this idea. 



#9 Julie of KY

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Posted 12 August 2017 - 09:10 PM

Talk through the pros and cons and don't make a rushed decision. However, it does sound like she's ready for college.

 


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#10 Janeway

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Posted 12 August 2017 - 09:44 PM

Wow, I just know how you feel. My 15 yr old has a Sept birthday, so he will be turning 16 yrs old this fall, so he is labeled a 10th grader. However, it is clear he will have all his credits to graduate the next year. 

 

In my case, he is not asking to graduate early, yet. HOWEVER, I will say I wanted to graduate early when I was in high school and my parents were against it and I got stuck in high school an extra year. It was a waste for me. In my case, I am a summer birthday so if I had graduated a year early, I would have been just turned 17 when I left for college. Also, in my case, I had no extracurriculars or anything that made it worth it to stick around for 12th grade. I spent my time working 30-40 hrs a week. I still graduated a term early, so I was done half way through the year. 

 

I would have a big heart to heart and make sure she really understands what it will mean to be done a year earlier. And then if you feel she gets it and you have a good plan in mind to where she will go next, then let her go. If you think she really is not ready, then maybe hold back. Good luck with how everything goes.


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#11 Janeway

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Posted 12 August 2017 - 09:45 PM

This kid always has a plan. She came to me with her transcript completely reworked. We discussed pros and cons, she looked into moving her test dates around and she already had college application deadlines, testing deadlines etc...on a spreadsheet. 

Sounds like a person with a plan. Sounds like it might be a good idea.



#12 RootAnn

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Posted 12 August 2017 - 09:48 PM

Sounds like you need to be working on her counselor letter and school profile.

:)

#13 Chanley

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Posted 12 August 2017 - 10:06 PM

Sounds like you need to be working on her counselor letter and school profile.

:)

Yes, I need to do the counselor letter. She already has her Common App stuff started with class descriptions etc...

 

I am really going to be in a bind when #2 wants to go to college. That one does not even know where he put his shoes, we are going to be like the blind leading the blind. 



#14 8FillTheHeart

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Posted 13 August 2017 - 06:48 AM

I couldn't do it with a student who wanted to go away to a 4 yr school, regardless of how ready she might be, if I didn't have a financial plan already in place.
**Rushing ahead for 1 yr would ultimately limit my kids opportunities if test scores weren't already at automatic scholarship level now.
**Not making that transcript that much more competitive and not giving me time to research schools and putting together my materials would equally reduce options.

The cons of eliminating good financial application options over expediency would be enough for me to say no bc I know how much time and energy I put into researching schools that match my kids' abilities in order to maximize their scholarship potential. No way I could start in mid-Aug reserarching schools and putting my guidance stuff together in order to have a solid list done in time for her to apply by mid-Oct/Nov 1 deadlines.

If $$ didn't matter, then I might take the go ahead stance of other posters. I have never lived there, so my perception of college applications is skewed by our experience. The application list is vital for my kids' future options. It takes me months to help them put it together and it takes them weeks to put together their best effort applications.
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#15 Calming Tea

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Posted 13 August 2017 - 03:55 PM

Oh I would absolutely get moving on those applications and let her move on with life. I have seen SO MANY kids go downhill senior year because our society stretches out childhood way too long.  In a small town, with few opportunities for growth, work and internships, that would only amplify my opinion.  Additionally she sounds motivated, and you say she is ready, and mature. I would absolutely let her move on.

 



#16 Ellie

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Posted 13 August 2017 - 08:08 PM

I don't believe in red-shirting.

 

I believe that if someone has earned enough credits to be graduated, she should be graduated, regardless of her age. Not to do so would be punishing her for working hard.



#17 FaithManor

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Posted 13 August 2017 - 08:57 PM

I was exactly like this and went to college at 16.5 and had my BA by 20. I was fine. My cousin did the same. Some kids are just like this so I say make her a senior.

#18 8FillTheHeart

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Posted 13 August 2017 - 09:10 PM

I don't believe in red-shirting.

I believe that if someone has earned enough credits to be graduated, she should be graduated, regardless of her age. Not to do so would be punishing her for working hard.

Plenty of states have mid-Aug/Sept 1 cut-off dates, so a late Sept bday would be a jr, not a sr, in those states.

DEing and taking AP credits during 12th grade is neither stagnating nor punishing a student for hard work. It sounds to me like typical 12th grade level work for college bound students. Only the mom and Dd know the coursework completed, the current test scores, and the financial picture and whether or not graduating this yr or next is for the best. Red-shirting or dislike of it should not be part of the decision. Both the ability to be accepted to and to afford to attend the schools where the student can pursue her future goals should be the goal. Depending on goals, it is not as simple as having enough credit hrs. The college application process can be far more complicated than that.

I have had kids who based on cr hrs could have graduated from high school early, but they would have been very poorly served by that decision bc they wouldn't have been as competitive as applicants. They pursued college level work while in high school which made their transcripts stronger. Graduation based on strictly cr hrs would have meant that they would have had to live at home and commute to the local directional university bc that is what our budget would have allotted. By homeschooling through 12th grade and pursuing higher level courses, they were awarded high dollar scholarships from multiple universities and were invited to join high profile programs with amazing perks. And those DE and AP credit hrs weren't treading water and wasting time. They carried those credit hrs in and had a lot of flexibility as UGs, including taking grad level courses.

No punishment involved. The opposite is true: reward for hard work well done.

Edited by 8FillTheHeart, 13 August 2017 - 09:16 PM.

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#19 Ellie

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Posted 13 August 2017 - 10:54 PM

Plenty of states have mid-Aug/Sept 1 cut-off dates, so a late Sept bday would be a jr, not a sr, in those states.

DEing and taking AP credits during 12th grade is neither stagnating nor punishing a student for hard work. It sounds to me like typical 12th grade level work for college bound students. Only the mom and Dd know the coursework completed, the current test scores, and the financial picture and whether or not graduating this yr or next is for the best. Red-shirting or dislike of it should not be part of the decision. Both the ability to be accepted to and to afford to attend the schools where the student can pursue her future goals should be the goal. Depending on goals, it is not as simple as having enough credit hrs. The college application process can be far more complicated than that.

I have had kids who based on cr hrs could have graduated from high school early, but they would have been very poorly served by that decision bc they wouldn't have been as competitive as applicants. They pursued college level work while in high school which made their transcripts stronger. Graduation based on strictly cr hrs would have meant that they would have had to live at home and commute to the local directional university bc that is what our budget would have allotted. By homeschooling through 12th grade and pursuing higher level courses, they were awarded high dollar scholarships from multiple universities and were invited to join high profile programs with amazing perks. And those DE and AP credit hrs weren't treading water and wasting time. They carried those credit hrs in and had a lot of flexibility as UGs, including taking grad level courses.

No punishment involved. The opposite is true: reward for hard work well done.

 

We don't even have to discuss which grade. A homeschooled young adult who completes enough credits gets to graduate, whenever that is, however those credits were earned, whether they were AP or c.c. or anything else. "Grade level" is irrelevant. Homeschoolers always talk about that, how their children never know what to answer when non-homeschoolers ask them what "grade" they are "in." (And some of them do red-shirt their homeschooled children.) So it isn't logical to talk about "12th grade" when we're discussing whether a young adult has finished her education at home. Whenever that happens, however it happens, she should be graduated.



#20 8FillTheHeart

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Posted 14 August 2017 - 04:43 AM

We don't even have to discuss which grade. A homeschooled young adult who completes enough credits gets to graduate, whenever that is, however those credits were earned, whether they were AP or c.c. or anything else. "Grade level" is irrelevant. Homeschoolers always talk about that, how their children never know what to answer when non-homeschoolers ask them what "grade" they are "in." (And some of them do red-shirt their homeschooled children.) So it isn't logical to talk about "12th grade" when we're discussing whether a young adult has finished her education at home. Whenever that happens, however it happens, she should be graduated.

I strongly disagree with this advice. It reflects your approach, not all homeschoolers. My kids are called by grade level regardless of what level of academics they are completing. My ds who was taking alg at age 10 was a 5th grader.

Based on completing cr hrs, my college freshman could have graduated in 9th or 10th grade, depending on whether or not alg 2 or pre-cal completed her core math requirements. And graduating her then would have accomplished absolutely nothing but limit her future. It would have deprived her of success. It was her accomplishments during 10th-12th and her advanced coursework beyond typical high school credits that made her competitive for scholarships.

If the local CC and living at home had been her goal, sure, graduating her whenever wouldn't have mattered. If she wanted to be competitive for schools that absolutely do care about what those high school yrs were spent taking and want to see advanced level coursework and achievements, graduating her when she simply checked off the high school credit boxes would have meant most likely denied, not accepted, of if accepted, certainly not with large scholarships.

These things matter. Admissions at many schools requires certain levels of academics AND test scores AND outside achievements. Completing a minimum of required high school credits and graduating a student can limit their options and cost their families hundreds of thousands of dollars. Thank goodness you weren't giving me advice that I listened to. Between my current 2 college kids that advice would have cost us $120,000 for one and $160,000 for the other.

$280,000 in scholarships plus all of the additional mentoring and support as elite scholars at their respective schools while attending the college of their choice vs. living at home and driving to the local school bc they graduated bc they met the high school cr requirements but were not competitive for scholarships, those are the discrepancies between the inisisting that graduation is based strictly on completing cr hrs. The advice is not as straightforward as you portray it.

Edited by 8FillTheHeart, 14 August 2017 - 05:05 AM.

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#21 Chanley

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Posted 14 August 2017 - 10:59 AM

**Rushing ahead for 1 yr would ultimately limit my kids opportunities if test scores weren't already at automatic scholarship level now.
**Not making that transcript that much more competitive and not giving me time to research schools and putting together my materials would equally reduce options.

 

Yes! This is my biggest concern.  We have some wiggle room before we make the determination final to see what her test scores look like when she takes the SAT at the end of August. But you have voiced my biggest concern. Her transcript is not weak but of course it would be stronger with 2 more APs and 3 more DE classes for sure. 

 

 

 

Oh I would absolutely get moving on those applications and let her move on with life. I have seen SO MANY kids go downhill senior year because our society stretches out childhood way too long.  In a small town, with few opportunities for growth, work and internships, that would only amplify my opinion.  Additionally she sounds motivated, and you say she is ready, and mature. I would absolutely let her move on.

 

And this is the other side of the coin, I could totally see this happen. She says she will regret not graduating for the entirety of next year if she does not. 

 

 

I am not sure I have the intestinal fortitude for this kind of stuff. When people said "big kids, big problems", they were not joking. I keep trying to remind myself that this is not as bad as others problems with teens but it is keeping me up at night. I have about 2 minutes every morning when I first wake up where I am happy before I realize there is this huge decision on the table and the feeling of dread creeps back onto my chest. 



#22 snowbeltmom

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Posted 14 August 2017 - 11:31 AM

So my dd was born in late Sept. I never put a grade on our schoolwork until around 8th grade. I "red shirted" her when I was forced to put a grade on a PSAT. She took several high school level courses in the 8th grade at WTMA. Anyway, long story short...her 12th grade year was going to be full of fun DE classes at the local CC and some tougher APs to round out her portfolio and perhaps give her another year to boost SAT/ACT scores. 

 

So she comes to me tonight and says, what do you think about calling this my senior year and me graduating in 2018.  She has more than enough credits to do this. 

 

Folks, I think I am going to have a heart attack. I know she is mature enough to handle being a senior and leaving next year. This rushes applications and essays. I like to plan things 8-12 months in advance. Seriously, you should see my planner. All of this makes me feel dizzy. 

 

She spent the summer studying for the SAT, about 2 hours a day. She has worked hard and is so ready to leave this small town that we live in. 

 

 

What does the hive mind think about this?

(Sorry this is disjointed, I am reeling.)

I agree with the PP who say that the answer to this question depends on where your daughter is planning on applying.  If she is applying to colleges with competitive admissions or if you will need aid to make it affordable, I would not have your daughter graduate this year.

 

There are many students who could graduate early if the only stipulation was fulfilling their state's high school requirements.  However, the vast majority of students who simply meet their state's graduation requirements are not being accepted to selective universities that either award merit aid or meet full financial need of their admitted students.

 

Your daughter's application will be much more competitive if she waits another year before she graduates. 

 

Good luck in your decision.


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#23 JanetC

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Posted 14 August 2017 - 11:58 AM

Where are you in graduation readiness? Have you been keeping up your transcript and course descriptions year by year? Do you have a college list? Do you understand financial aid or have a bunch of money stashed away? Do you have test scores? (SAT, ACT, perhaps subject tests)

If you have a kid like my first one, it's really not that hard to get everything together for January deadlines. She took one SAT and was done testing and applied to "average competitive" rather than "super competitive" schools.

If you have a kid like my second one, it could be a real stretch to have everything ready for a November 1st scholarship deadline school. (She has two with November 1st scholarship deadlines, plus 3 schools that recommend subject tests.)

If you don't have an SAT test score to see where you are in range and a college list you can use to figure out when the important deadlines are, you should spend the year doing the typical college visits and research, get your tests and paperwork in order, and do one more year of high school during which you actually apply.

#24 Chanley

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Posted 14 August 2017 - 12:45 PM

Where are you in graduation readiness? Have you been keeping up your transcript and course descriptions year by year? Do you have a college list? Do you understand financial aid or have a bunch of money stashed away? Do you have test scores? (SAT, ACT, perhaps subject tests)

 

Yes, all of this is done. She had a college spreadsheet completed by Christmas of last year.  She is the one who started the Common App account and was filling in the transcript stuff when she realized she could technically graduate this year. When we needed a portfolio for dual enrollment last year, she grabbed a jump drive with everything we needed already scanned, in folders by year. She did all of the work. She is possibly the most organized and prepared person I have ever met.

 

 This kid is super motivated and has already worked 3 weeks ahead in classes that have not even begun this year. All of her friends have graduated and moved on, so her free time is just reading and doing extra school work. 

 

Her current scores qualify her for merit aid in state. The worse case scenario is that she stays in state which she does not want to do. 

 

This is all so hard, I can see both sides of this coin. 



#25 GoodGrief

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Posted 14 August 2017 - 01:30 PM

It very much depends on what her current transcript looks like and what her goals for college admission are. Really hard to advise without those details. :-) I don't necessarily think "fun" DE classes strengthen her transcript (depends on what you mean by fun) if they demonstrate decreased rigor of coursework for senior year, and not all AP courses are equal when it comes to college admissions. It also depends on what accomplishments she has under her belt already and whether having another year would bring more achievements (essential for competitive scholarships.) The SAT score is a lesser concern, as she could certainly focus between now and the August or October test dates to bring that up.

It does sound like she has the drive and maturity to do this, if the transcript and accomplishments are sufficient :-) And if she isn't interested in competitive colleges or scholarships, that makes things much simpler.

Edited by Gr8lander, 14 August 2017 - 01:31 PM.

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#26 8FillTheHeart

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Posted 14 August 2017 - 02:12 PM

Yes, all of this is done. She had a college spreadsheet completed by Christmas of last year.  She is the one who started the Common App account and was filling in the transcript stuff when she realized she could technically graduate this year. When we needed a portfolio for dual enrollment last year, she grabbed a jump drive with everything we needed already scanned, in folders by year. She did all of the work. She is possibly the most organized and prepared person I have ever met.

 

 This kid is super motivated and has already worked 3 weeks ahead in classes that have not even begun this year. All of her friends have graduated and moved on, so her free time is just reading and doing extra school work. 

 

Her current scores qualify her for merit aid in state. The worse case scenario is that she stays in state which she does not want to do. 

 

This is all so hard, I can see both sides of this coin. 

 

Being mature and ready aside (I take that as a given for high-achieving kids), I would not let emotions sway decisions.  I would approach this with research and facts. Put her wishes aside and look at the data.

 

Have you run net price calculators for the schools she wants to attend OOS?  That would be my very first step.  Today.  If the schools are not affordable with where you stand today, then she needs to consider 1 of 2 options:  other schools or not graduating early.  

 

If they are affordable, you need to spend time reading accepted student profiles and be brutally honest with her about how she compares. For non-competitive schools that isn't that big of a deal.  For competitive schools it is key. That means you need to know how she compares to their published numbers:  avg # of APs/DE/IB courses, test scores, etc.  For example, this is from GA Tech's press release: "The average academic profile is a 33 ACT, 1468 SAT, 11 college-level courses, and an A average."  If your dd wanted to be accepted to GT, then her profile better be equal to or exceed their published data to be competitive for admissions.  If the school emphasizes holistic admissions and leadership, service, community, does she have those strengths that are notable beyond the norm?  Standing out leads to acceptance. Blending in is not the place a student wants to land.

 

Once you have facts, the decision should be much easier.


Edited by 8FillTheHeart, 14 August 2017 - 02:13 PM.

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#27 katilac

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Posted 14 August 2017 - 03:46 PM

I will echo much of what 8 said. 

 

It's very dependent on where she wants to go, what program she wants to get in, how much money she has. 

 

End of August SAT is going to mean mid- to end-September scores. That's late for competitive colleges and programs if she has to take it again. Does she at least have practice scores to work with? A short list of colleges? If she wants to go out of state, does she know what she needs to make that affordable? Does she have a true safety that she can see herself attending happily? A true safety is one where you are sure that you can both get in AND afford it. 

 

I have no problem with someone graduating a year earlier than intended, or at a slightly younger age than common (late September won't make her very young anyway). I don't agree that "number of credits" is the all-encompassing qualification or sign of readiness. I mean, plenty of kids around here graduate with the bare minimum of core credits, they are qualified to graduate, and they do, but their choices after graduation are certainly more limited. 

 

I would let her proceed with planning and research at this point, with the caveat that this does not equal a done deal. I would also be VERY clear on what you can offer financially the first year and the following years, and what this might mean for her choices.

 

I wouldn't be against it.  She just has to understand that she is possibly limiting her choices a bit more. If her score is only enough for in-state, then it's her decision whether that's worth it. Personally I would not pay thousands upon thousands more per year if I felt that she could improve that score with time. 

 

When you say that she has college, testing, and other deadlines noted already, does that include scholarship priority deadlines? That's a big one. 



#28 Chanley

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Posted 14 August 2017 - 04:43 PM

 

 

When you say that she has college, testing, and other deadlines noted already, does that include scholarship priority deadlines? That's a big one. 

Yes, this is all on her spreadsheet. I have looked at the college cost calculators, we have told her what we can afford. She is aware of all of this. 

 

She keeps coming back with the idea that a big name school is not all "that" important and that if she is unhappy at a school that may be less competitive, she can transfer. She is banking on a strong graduate school moreso than a big name undergrad. 

 

She has done all of the ground work. She has been taking ACT or SAT tests yearly for the last 3 years, she is currently as I type this taking a practice ACT. Yesterday it was an SAT practice test. She is really gunning for this and I am just really trying to find my footing in the world where this seems like a crazy parallel universe I have stepped into. 



#29 GoodGrief

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Posted 14 August 2017 - 04:56 PM

Yes, this is all on her spreadsheet. I have looked at the college cost calculators, we have told her what we can afford. She is aware of all of this. 

 

She keeps coming back with the idea that a big name school is not all "that" important and that if she is unhappy at a school that may be less competitive, she can transfer. She is banking on a strong graduate school moreso than a big name undergrad. 

 

She has done all of the ground work. She has been taking ACT or SAT tests yearly for the last 3 years, she is currently as I type this taking a practice ACT. Yesterday it was an SAT practice test. She is really gunning for this and I am just really trying to find my footing in the world where this seems like a crazy parallel universe I have stepped into. 

 

Ah, sorry I misunderstood the original post. I thought you were looking for opinions. :-) Sounds like she is aware of the ramifications of this choice. Hang in there, Mama! It will be just fine.



#30 Chanley

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Posted 14 August 2017 - 05:00 PM

Ah, sorry I misunderstood the original post. I thought you were looking for opinions. :-) Sounds like she is aware of the ramifications of this choice. Hang in there, Mama! It will be just fine.

I was/am looking for opinions. I want to evaluate this from every possible angle which sometimes requires other vantage points. 



#31 Calming Tea

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Posted 14 August 2017 - 06:09 PM

How about visits?  Has she had time to visit the actual campuses?  I myself and both of my kids find that the wrong "vibe" scenery, etc. can be very depressing and discouraging.  My daughter needs nature, wide open spaces, trees, ...she could never attend a mostly city college/campus.  And prefers smaller venues, so when she gets older I know she will be looking at under 3000 colleges. If that.

 

My son needs things to be upkept and new, and doesn't mind more city-like atmosphere... and I know he needs quiet sleep so the dormroom situation would be super important - he would need dorms that have only one room mate or a single occupancy bedroom, etc.  HE CANNOT function with little sleep..(as well as his severe food allergy needs but that wouldn't apply to your dd)  

 

 



#32 8FillTheHeart

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Posted 14 August 2017 - 06:52 PM

Yes, this is all on her spreadsheet. I have looked at the college cost calculators, we have told her what we can afford. She is aware of all of this.

She keeps coming back with the idea that a big name school is not all "that" important and that if she is unhappy at a school that may be less competitive, she can transfer. She is banking on a strong graduate school moreso than a big name undergrad.

She has done all of the ground work. She has been taking ACT or SAT tests yearly for the last 3 years, she is currently as I type this taking a practice ACT. Yesterday it was an SAT practice test. She is really gunning for this and I am just really trying to find my footing in the world where this seems like a crazy parallel universe I have stepped into.


I agree 100% that if you can afford the schools and she can be accepted that she should go for it. The only reason my antenna went up is bc you said she doesn't want to stay in-state and yet only had test scores to qualify for in-state merit. That doesn't really mesh with the understanding that big name doesn't matter. If she doesn't mind attending in-state then the scenario might be quite simple.

Fwiw, I would discourage her from running with the idea that she can always just transfer to a more competitive school later. Transferring may be more expensive bc the best scholarships are for incoming freshman. Also, some schools' transfer admissions are tougher than their freshman and some even require high school transcripts and test scores to be admitted with their application. So, if she doesn't think she can be admitted as a freshman, the scenario as a transfer might not be much different.

Attending a lower ranked school with a reciprocity agreement for matriculation later on is different. That is a viable option that plenty of kids pursue.
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#33 Sebastian (a lady)

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Posted 14 August 2017 - 07:02 PM

When you and she say that she has "enough" credits to graduate, where are you looking to see graduation requirements?

 

The states I have lived in do not stipulate credit requirements for homeschoolers.  They do have graduation requirements for public schooled students.  Those requirements represent the minimum requirements to get a basic or advanced diploma.  They do not represent what makes a student competitive for a selective out of state school.  (Our in state university system has a minimum test score and gpa requirement and accepts all students who make it.  It is not highly ranked in most degree programs.)

 

My homeschool has the following high school requirements:  4 years each of math, English, science, and history/social studies (may include government or economics) plus at least 3 years of a foreign language.

 

Both of my graduates did more than the minimum requirements.  For example, they both took calculus and statistics as dual credit courses at a community college senior year.  Both took two semesters of college introductory General Chemistry in addition to their 3 years of other science courses.  One took two credits of Chinese after completing 4 years of Latin.

 

The were both accepted to very good universities and both earned scholarships that pay full tuition, fees, and a monthly stipend.  One earned an additional scholarship that will be $12k over 4 years.  Their transcripts and experiences were not dissimilar to other students receiving these scholarships or being admitted to the same schools.  

 

Would you dd consider doing most or all of her coursework at a community college next year for her senior year?  This would let her experience a lot of independence, take the next step academically, but also preserve her standing as a high school student, which would allow her to apply as a senior with college courses under her belt or in progress, but also be admitted as a first time college freshman.

 

Or has she already tapped out the offerings at your local CC?  What is her academic goal for college?

 


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#34 katilac

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Posted 14 August 2017 - 07:26 PM

 

She keeps coming back with the idea that a big name school is not all "that" important a 

 

I absolutely agree with her on that, a big name school is not needed for all students (even stellar ones), just wanted to make sure she was aware of both that and the financials. And, if she has taken several of each test, she should have a very good idea of where she stands for admission and merit aid.  

 

She seems to be driving this and doing most of the prep work, which I give much more credence than idle dreaming or complaining. If it won't leave you flat-footed financially, I'd be inclined to let her make the decision, particularly if she has reached an acceptable level in math and has decent math scores (I doubt her other scores would go up substantially with another year of practice, but if she's not had the majority of math she needs, that score would go up). 

 

The concerns and considerations are real, but it sounds like you are both taking them into account. She should have an extremely good idea of her possibilities at this point, so as long as she is content with them . . . 

 

My oldest was itching to go - even though she was DE at the local uni, she needed a wider world and different challenges. I also think she's the kind of kid who needs to be away from from those who have known her best in order to find her authentic self. She just wanted to go (which I try not to be insulted by, lol).  

 

What's the worst that can happen? If you have to switch schools, you switch schools. The world keeps turning. If you fail out your first semester, that's going to have repercussions, yet the world keeps turning.