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#1 regentrude

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Posted 11 August 2017 - 05:34 PM

I could use the hive's wisdom. Our family is in the fortunate situation to be able to pay for our kid's university, but a young person in my life is interested in a college education and her parents are unwilling/unable to contribute. The young woman will be working full time and is trying to save money for transportation, living expenses and her schooling. She has been homeschooled and does not seem to have received any college counseling. I am trying to help. These are my thoughs so far - and my questions.

 

First, I think she should aim for an AA to have as a stepping stone. 

Am I correct that one can cobble together the credits from different institutions? Or does the bulk have to be earned at the same CC?

 

Utilize CLEP tests. She can self study and test out - this is the cheapest option to earn college credits, right? I know some universities are picky; would CCs acccept pretty much all CLEP?

When you earn an Associates and want to transfer to a 4 year college: do they evaluate al courses and CLEPs, or does the receiving college accepts the AA as a "package deal" and does not question how credits were earned? I.e., would a uni that does not give credit for a CLEP accept the course if the student earns an AA?

 

Are there CCs that offer a complete online degree? This would give her more flexibility to work.

 

I vaguely recall that there is some college that serves as an umbrella to facilitate "homeschooling college" by letting the student put together the program largely from CLEPs and perhaps other examinations? ETA: Thomas Jefferson! no, Edison! Anybody knows more about that?

 

Math. I assume for any degree, the student needs to pass College Algebra? Math was not the strong point of the homeschool and will require remediation. I think the cheapest and easiest way would be to self study with a tutor until ready for CLEP? I would imagine it is easier to pass the CLEP College Algebra test than to take a course?

 

What kind of financial aid in terms of grants is available for students from low income families? Educate me about Pell Grants, please. Does the student need to be a full time student? Can one estimate eligibility through online calculators? I assume the parents would be cooperative and provide their info for the FAFSA.

 

I have no doubt that the student is intelligent and orgnized and capable of earning a college degree. She has taken one or two college classes successfully. The big obstacle is that, due to constrained finances and lack of guidance, she has no clear plan how to proceed. Thanks for all the help.


Edited by regentrude, 13 August 2017 - 08:02 AM.

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#2 Catwoman

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Posted 11 August 2017 - 05:46 PM

I know you said Thomas Jefferson, but did you mean Thomas Edison State University in NJ? If you were thinking of Thomas Edison, I believe the student would have to be 21 years old to enroll.
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#3 Katy

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Posted 11 August 2017 - 05:50 PM

I think this is so state specific she should probably start with a local community college counselor, take the COMPASS test, and talk to them.  I know where we are currently the community colleges accept almost all the CLEP exams, but the universities do not include them in their transfer agreements, they only give credit for the handful of CLEP & AP exams they take.


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#4 scrapbookbuzz

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Posted 11 August 2017 - 05:55 PM

She could start by looking at these free courses. Take a few to find what really interests her without going into debt over it.

 

This one was started by a group of people including Bill Gates, I believe

 

I've taken free courses through here and been very pleased

 

Offered through Johns Hopkins University

 

Hope this helps!


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#5 regentrude

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Posted 11 August 2017 - 06:01 PM

I know you said Thomas Jefferson, but did you mean Thomas Edison State University in NJ? If you were thinking of Thomas Edison, I believe the student would have to be 21 years old to enroll.

 

Thanks - yes, Edison!


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#6 BlsdMama

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Posted 11 August 2017 - 06:01 PM

 

I could use the hive's wisdom. Our family is in the fortunate situation to be able to pay for our kid's university, but a young person in my life is interested in a college education and her parents are unwilling/unable to contribute. The young woman will be working full time and is trying to save money for transportation, living expenses and her schooling. She has been homeschooled and does not seem to have received any college counseling. I am trying to help. These are my thoughs so far - and my questions.

 

First, I think she should aim for an AA to have as a stepping stone. 

Am I correct that one can cobble together the credits from different institutions? Or does the bulk have to be earned at the same CC?

 

Utilize CLEP tests. She can self study and test out - this is the cheapest option to earn college credits, right? I know some universities are picky; would CCs acccept pretty much all CLEP?

When you earn an Associates and want to transfer to a 4 year college: do they evaluate al courses and CLEPs, or does the receiving college accepts the AA as a "package deal" and does not question how credits were earned? I.e., would a uni that does not give credit for a CLEP accept the course if the student earns an AA?

 

Are there CCs that offer a complete online degree? This would give her more flexibility to work.

 

I vaguely recall that there is some college that serves as an umbrella to facilitate "homeschooling college" by letting the student put together the program largely from CLEPs and perhaps other examinations? ETA: Thomas Jefferson! Anybody knows more about that?

 

Math. I assume for any degree, the student needs to pass College Algebra? Math was not the strong point of the homeschool and will require remediation. I think the cheapest and easiest way would be to self study with a tutor until ready for CLEP? I would imagine it is easier to pass the CLEP College Algebra test than to take a course?

 

What kind of financial aid in terms of grants is available for students from low income families? Educate me about Pell Grants, please. Does the student need to be a full time student? Can one estimate eligibility through online calculators? I assume the parents would be cooperative and provide their info for the FAFSA.

 

I have no doubt that the student is intelligent and orgnized and capable of earning a college degree. She has taken one or two college classes successfully. The big obstacle is that, due to constrained finances and lack of guidance, she has no clear plan how to proceed. Thanks for all the help.

 

 

 

Do you think she has taken the SAT or ACT?  If so, knowing those scores would be important.  For both of my kids it was cheaper (free) to go to the state university.  They would *not* have gotten the bigger scholarships coming in as a transfer student.

 

If she has not taken any entrance exam and/or they were poor, then community college is her best option.  If she applies and fills out her FAFSA then you can wait and see what the financial aid offer comes out to be.  It is possible she is eligible for need based grants.  However, the FAFSA is the key to that. 

ETA: And I was able to get almost my entire AA online.  It may be very worthwhile to check into the local CCs and see what they offer.  They also have pretty flexible schedules.  Almost everyone who attends CC works a job of some sort, many are adults handling jobs and school.


Edited by BlsdMama, 11 August 2017 - 06:03 PM.

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#7 regentrude

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Posted 11 August 2017 - 06:03 PM

She could start by looking at these free courses. Take a few to find what really interests her without going into debt over it.

 

This one was started by a group of people including Bill Gates, I believe

 

I've taken free courses through here and been very pleased

 

Offered through Johns Hopkins University

 

Hope this helps!

 

do they give formal college credit that is transferable?



#8 Quill

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Posted 11 August 2017 - 06:04 PM

This makes me so sad for that young woman, but also so grateful for her that you are supporting and mentoring her! I was in a similar circumstance at early adulthood but I did not have a resource like you are providing.

I can answer a couple of your questions from my experience, but it does vary by state and location.

In the state of Maryland, there are transfer agreements between the CCs and the state public schools. There is also an online tool called ARTSYS that a student can look at to evaluate whether or not credits earned at CC will transfer directly to colleges. I am not totally certain, but I think earning the AA at the CC eliminates or heavily reduces the scrutiny regarding those credits earned for the AA. It is more likely that the AA is accepted at face value for the Gen Ed requirements. The probability of all credits earned for the AA being directly applicable to the BA/BS also depends on the focus area and desired eventual major. part of the AA will be electives, but obviously it will be better if those electives will satisfy electives needed for the eventual Bachelor's.

I did not do any CLEPs, but I believe if they are part of the AA, it is treated the same by the 4yr school as it would be if they were earned at the CC. I *personally* did not want to get my college math credits through self-study and attempting CLEP. I had received a very sub-par math education and was very phobic and certain I was simply incapable of learning math. I desperately needed a great professor remediating me at the college level, even though it was philosophically hard to accept that I was paying for classes and earning no credit. I had to take two remedial courses but I think they were the MOST valuable classes I took, not just because I learned the necessary math, but because I had faith in myself restored. Those were the first classes I took at CC and I am so glad I did not attempt to self-study it. (Of course, her situation may be different, but for me, it was better that I went in person to a class.)

Many of my classes at CC were on-line or had that as an option. I generally preferred to physically go whenever possible, because there is something to be said for being part of the community. CC had many students in a similar place as myself and it was comforting - many older men and women either learning a new career or getting their first degree later in life.

I don't know about the parameters for Pell grants. I think my sister had one at one time, but she was a single mother, so that may have been a factor. I do not think she was a FT student. Some scholarships are based on being FT, but my instinct is that Pell is not one of them. The purpose of Pell is to assist people who have limited options, and those are often people unable to be FT students. There is usually a lot of information on my CC website about scholarships. Many times they are small scholarships, nut it is worthwhile to look on the site and see what might be available.

I hope that helps and wish her great success. You are a great person for helping her.
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#9 regentrude

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Posted 11 August 2017 - 06:05 PM

Do you think she has taken the SAT or ACT?  If so, knowing those scores would be important.  For both of my kids it was cheaper (free) to go to the state university.  They would *not* have gotten the bigger scholarships coming in as a transfer student.

 

If she has not taken any entrance exam and/or they were poor, then community college is her best option.  If she applies and fills out her FAFSA then you can wait and see what the financial aid offer comes out to be.  It is possible she is eligible for need based grants.  However, the FAFSA is the key to that. 

ETA: And I was able to get almost my entire AA online.  It may be very worthwhile to check into the local CCs and see what they offer.  They also have pretty flexible schedules.  Almost everyone who attends CC works a job of some sort, many are adults handling jobs and school.

 

She does not have the funds to attend the stat uni. She has to work. I doubt she can get such a stellar score on the ACT that the school woudl give her a free ride since her math education has been lacking. But it's a good though; she should look into it.

 

The local CCs do not offer enough online courses.



#10 Catwoman

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Posted 11 August 2017 - 06:05 PM

Thanks - yes, Edison!


I just checked and apparently the minimum age for enrollment is still 21. I'm not sure if a younger student could start banking credits there (from CLEP and other tests) without being formally enrolled, but it might be worth contacting them and asking about that.

It's very kind of you to try to help her. :)

Edited to add link: http://www.tesu.edu/...-admissions.cfm

Edited by Catwoman, 11 August 2017 - 06:05 PM.

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#11 regentrude

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Posted 11 August 2017 - 06:07 PM

Thanks, Quill.

 

 I *personally* did not want to get my college math credits through self-study and attempting CLEP. I had received a very sub-par math education and was very phobic and certain I was simply incapable of learning math. I desperately needed a great professor remediating me at the college level, even though it was philosophically hard to accept that I was paying for classes and earning no credit. I had to take two remedial courses but I think they were the MOST valuable classes I took, not just because I learned the necessary math, but because I had faith in myself restored. Those were the first classes I took at CC and I am so glad I did not attempt to self-study it. (Of course, her situation may be different, but for me, it was better that I went in person to a class.)

 

I think I could be able to be that professor for her, if she is willing to accept my help. 


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#12 regentrude

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Posted 11 August 2017 - 06:09 PM

I just checked and apparently the minimum age for enrollment is still 21. I'm not sure if a younger student could start banking credits there (from CLEP and other tests) without being formally enrolled, but it might be worth contacting them and asking about that.

It's very kind of you to try to help her. :)

Edited to add link: http://www.tesu.edu/...-admissions.cfm

 

Thank you, this is helpful to know.


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#13 Katy

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Posted 11 August 2017 - 06:09 PM

I think Charter Oak was working on a free transfer agreement from an online free credit source, I want to say it was Saylor.org.  An acquaintance has her child working through their curriculum instead of typical middle school curriculum.  You might check Saylor and see if they still have that going.



#14 Liz CA

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Posted 11 August 2017 - 06:12 PM

 

I could use the hive's wisdom. Our family is in the fortunate situation to be able to pay for our kid's university, but a young person in my life is interested in a college education and her parents are unwilling/unable to contribute. The young woman will be working full time and is trying to save money for transportation, living expenses and her schooling. She has been homeschooled and does not seem to have received any college counseling. I am trying to help. These are my thoughs so far - and my questions.

 

First, I think she should aim for an AA to have as a stepping stone. 

Am I correct that one can cobble together the credits from different institutions? Or does the bulk have to be earned at the same CC? As far as I know you can collect credits at various institutions. I had credits from two different places.

 

Utilize CLEP tests. She can self study and test out - this is the cheapest option to earn college credits, right? I know some universities are picky; would CCs acccept pretty much all CLEP?

When you earn an Associates and want to transfer to a 4 year college: do they evaluate al courses and CLEPs, or does the receiving college accepts the AA as a "package deal" and does not question how credits were earned? I.e., would a uni that does not give credit for a CLEP accept the course if the student earns an AA? I transferred to a 4-year with CLEP and AS degree. The university listed all credits (including CLEP) as CR or P - presumably for pass. Everything counted - nobody questioned the CLEP. As far as I know it is universally accepted but the number of credits a university accepts is discretionary. Most universities want the student to complete a certain amount of credits at that institution if they are supposed to confer a degree - and they want a little tuition too  :)

 

Are there CCs that offer a complete online degree? This would give her more flexibility to work. Could be but that needs to be researched.

 

I vaguely recall that there is some college that serves as an umbrella to facilitate "homeschooling college" by letting the student put together the program largely from CLEPs and perhaps other examinations? ETA: Thomas Jefferson! no, Edison! Anybody knows more about that? Don't know anything about this institution.

 

Math. I assume for any degree, the student needs to pass College Algebra? Math was not the strong point of the homeschool and will require remediation. I think the cheapest and easiest way would be to self study with a tutor until ready for CLEP? I would imagine it is easier to pass the CLEP College Algebra test than to take a course? Not necessarily. If this student gets a good teacher, it could make all the difference, especially if s/he is anxious about math. But if s/he has good basic math knowledge and just needs to pick up the algebra / geometry part, it may work fine.

 

What kind of financial aid in terms of grants is available for students from low income families? Educate me about Pell Grants, please. Does the student need to be a full time student? Can one estimate eligibility through online calculators? I assume the parents would be cooperative and provide their info for the FAFSA. Just assist student in filling out FAFSA. There is nothing to be lost and everything to be gained. I think if students are under a certain age, parents' income is considered.

 

I have no doubt that the student is intelligent and orgnized and capable of earning a college degree. She has taken one or two college classes successfully. The big obstacle is that, due to constrained finances and lack of guidance, she has no clear plan how to proceed. Thanks for all the help. Can you take her to a CC college counselor and sit in with her? A good counselor can lay out a plan for an AA/AS and all transfer requirements. Here in CA, there are slightly different requirement for a 4-year state university and a UC.

 

 


Edited by Liz CA, 11 August 2017 - 06:13 PM.

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#15 Quill

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Posted 11 August 2017 - 06:22 PM

What I don't know is how filling out the FAFSA works if the student is under 25(i think it is?) if the parents are begrudging about college. I wasn't sure from the OP if the parents are standing in the way of her going to college or if they are simply ignorant of the process and low income.
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#16 Minniewannabe

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Posted 11 August 2017 - 06:28 PM

Just some random thoughts. Definitely I am not an expert since I seem to always pay full price for college 🤔.

1. The degree should make a difference in her path. Some, for example, like medical school frown on junior colleges.

2. Cleps, etc. can actually hurt a college GPA in the long run if students do not get a chance to put that "A" on a course they clepped out on.

3. Many companies still contribute to college coursework. She needs to consider a working for a company which offers this benefit. (The one time I did not pay for college.)

4. Consider cheap housing options like RVs rather than conventional student housing.

5. Consider online programs. This seems to be the wave of the future anyway. Many times one can save money. Colleges that offer both online and on campus may make better financial sense over a 4 or 5 year period.

6. Try to nail down career goals. Changing degrees midstream can be expensive.

7. Surf the internet for scholarships.

8. If she has a company she really wants to go for, be bold. Walk up to Human Resources and see if they will pay for college in exchange for a future employment contract.

That's it on my out of the box ideas.
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#17 Katy

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Posted 11 August 2017 - 06:30 PM

What I don't know is how filling out the FAFSA works if the student is under 25(i think it is?) if the parents are begrudging about college. I wasn't sure from the OP if the parents are standing in the way of her going to college or if they are simply ignorant of the process and low income.

 

She can get emancipated from them, but would probably have to hire a lawyer.



#18 AngieW in Texas

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Posted 11 August 2017 - 06:51 PM

Students are not considered independent until they are 25yo or are married or have a child or are in the military or in graduate school. Up until then, they will need parent financial information for the FAFSA from both parents, even if they are not involved in her life at all and refuse to contribute a single penny.

 

I would recommend going to the cc and meeting with a counselor. If you can go with her to help, that would be great. She has not had these kinds of discussions and will find getting yoru feedback afterwards really helpful. She will think she understands what's going on while she's there, but then afterwards, will need you to help with interpretation.

 

I would not recommend online if it's at all possible to attend courses in person. It is very hard to do well in an online course if you are not knowledgeable and motivated about that subject unless you have a truly phenomenal online teacher (and I mean phenomenal at teaching online, which is very different from in-person).

 

She should take their placement exam to see if she needs to do remedial classes first of can go straight into classes.


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#19 regentrude

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Posted 11 August 2017 - 07:12 PM

Thanks for all the suggestions.

She needs to work full time because she needs a car and needs to move out of her parents' home. So, FT student is not an option. that is also the reason she is considering online, because that would allow her to work and earn.

Employment options locally are slim. Small town. Having a FT job as a barista is already pretty good. There are no employers who would pay for college.

Career goals - unclear. Some exploration is in order, but I think she needs college to help with that. Feeling stagnant does not help create visions and goals. (ETA: Neither med school nor elite unis are remotely considered.)

 


Edited by regentrude, 11 August 2017 - 07:13 PM.

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#20 regentrude

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Posted 11 August 2017 - 07:13 PM

What I don't know is how filling out the FAFSA works if the student is under 25(i think it is?) if the parents are begrudging about college. I wasn't sure from the OP if the parents are standing in the way of her going to college or if they are simply ignorant of the process and low income.

 

I do not think they are begrudging. They think she should go - they just don't want to contribute


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#21 xahm

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Posted 11 August 2017 - 07:18 PM

Is the military an option for this young lady? It's not right for everyone, but it's a well paying (comparatively for a person with no qualifications) job that would get her a place to live and educational benefits, as well as giving her some time to think about a career path.
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#22 Matryoshka

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Posted 11 August 2017 - 07:24 PM

Thanks for all the suggestions.

She needs to work full time because she needs a car and needs to move out of her parents' home. So, FT student is not an option. that is also the reason she is considering online, because that would allow her to work and earn.

Employment options locally are slim. Small town. Having a FT job as a barista is already pretty good. There are no employers who would pay for college.

Career goals - unclear. Some exploration is in order, but I think she needs college to help with that. Feeling stagnant does not help create visions and goals. (ETA: Neither med school nor elite unis are remotely considered.)

 

If she's a barista, any chance to work at Starbucks?  They'll pay for your degree at one of those online Arizona schools for you if you work there.  And full benefits.

 

https://www.starbuck...rs/college-plan


Edited by Matryoshka, 11 August 2017 - 07:26 PM.

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#23 Rebel Yell

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Posted 11 August 2017 - 07:31 PM

ABout Math: college algebra is not required for all majors, so I'm going to guess his varies widely.

Diamond got an associate in small business management, and business math was her math credit-its prerequisite was Math080, the equivalent of prealgebra and very very beginning high school algebra.

She is now a transfer student for a Bachelors degree, and a personal finance class will fulfill her math requirement (her business math only transferred as an elective)
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#24 OhElizabeth

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Posted 11 August 2017 - 07:31 PM

Another way to save on college is not to need an extra year from changing your major a lot. So the FIRST thing I would do is get some career testing through a college (Strong's Interest Inventory, whatever), so she can be pretty sure of the direction she's going. Around here we have a lot of older students at the branch schools. It's not uncommon for someone to be 23 and in their first or 2nd year of college. 

 

There are a surprising number of reasonable paying, direct entry jobs for people who are willing to work. I pay $15 an hour (double the minimum wage here!) for anyone 19 and up willing to work with my autistic son. In our state, that category of people willing to do sucky, better paying jobs is actually pretty broad. Amazon is here paying $12 an hour plus benefits, just walk in the door. Now amazon seems to work your butt off and can lead to injuries, but again it's good money, way better than minimum wage, and lots of hours.

 

That kind of stuff lets her explore areas, mature, find herself. I know people who've gotten their BA in one thing and gone back for a totally DIFFERENT BA/BS, when they realized they just had been so young they had NO CLUE what they wanted or were good at or would be happy at. So it can be very wise to slow down, take your time, try things.


Edited by OhElizabeth, 11 August 2017 - 07:32 PM.

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#25 regentrude

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Posted 11 August 2017 - 07:35 PM

Is the military an option for this young lady?

 

No, definitely not.



#26 G5052

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Posted 11 August 2017 - 07:36 PM

I would not recommend online if it's at all possible to attend courses in person. It is very hard to do well in an online course if you are not knowledgeable and motivated about that subject unless you have a truly phenomenal online teacher (and I mean phenomenal at teaching online, which is very different from in-person).

 

Yes, less than half of my online students make it with a passing grade. It's more like 3/4 in the face-to-face classes.

 

That said, it can work. A number of the students in the more advanced class I teach are in their last semester, and most have done all or nearly all of their courses online.

 

DD is taking all online in the fall for medical reasons, and she should do fine. She's done most of her high school work either with live online classes that met once or twice a week, or on her own, using a syllabus I wrote for her. We're hopeful that she can do some face-to-face in January.



#27 maize

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Posted 11 August 2017 - 08:08 PM

Straighterline can be an inexpensive way to get credit for some classes; actual credit would be granted through a partner school (as with CLEP)
http://www.straighterline.com

WGU is inexpensive and all online, but has limited degree options.

#28 Quill

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Posted 11 August 2017 - 08:10 PM

Thanks for all the suggestions.
She needs to work full time because she needs a car and needs to move out of her parents' home. So, FT student is not an option. that is also the reason she is considering online, because that would allow her to work and earn.
Employment options locally are slim. Small town. Having a FT job as a barista is already pretty good. There are no employers who would pay for college.
Career goals - unclear. Some exploration is in order, but I think she needs college to help with that. Feeling stagnant does not help create visions and goals. (ETA: Neither med school nor elite unis are remotely considered.)


This costs money (though not a lot), but I cannot say enough good things about You Science . com. The student plays some game-like tests that identify their aptitudes. Then the site compiles a pretty amazing and complete list of possible careers. Every career possibility is itself packed with more information: how much education is required, what majors support this career, projected growth and current job opening numbers, salary range, even a US map showing where employment in this career is most likely. I completed one for myself and also had DS17 do one and it is really an amazing resource.
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#29 J-rap

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Posted 11 August 2017 - 08:37 PM

Another thought would be a technical type school or junior college where she could get a specialized medical certificate, some even in just one year.  Some hospitals actually have a shortage of people who have very specific training in working with certain medical machines, for example.  

 

Do you think she'd be interested in something like that?  It might be a way to get started, anyway.  

 

In our state, once you are 24, there is a new program where as long as you take at least 6 credits per semester and your income is below a certain level, you can attend certain colleges within the state tuition-free.  There might be a couple other requirements, but it's along those lines.  So check your state carefully and you might find some programs that she fits into, if not now, maybe even in a year or two.

 

There is also a very good 4-year liberal arts university in our state that just started a new two year college within their university for low-income students, where the neediest students will never have to pay more than $1,000 per year.  I wonder if this option exists in other states too.

 

I think it's really wonderful that you're helping her!


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#30 regentrude

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Posted 11 August 2017 - 09:00 PM

Another thought would be a technical type school or junior college where she could get a specialized medical certificate, some even in just one year.  Some hospitals actually have a shortage of people who have very specific training in working with certain medical machines, for example.  

 

Do you think she'd be interested in something like that?  It might be a way to get started, anyway.  

 

She had at some point considered training to be a surgical technician (not sure I got the term right), but does not really feel called to it. Will have to revisit this and see what exactly the issue was. Thanks for the reminder.

 

ETA: But these programs are expensive, too. I looked at the local technical college (public): upward of $6,750/year for tuition; add fees and books and supplies for another 1.5-2k.


Edited by regentrude, 11 August 2017 - 09:05 PM.


#31 WendyAndMilo

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Posted 11 August 2017 - 09:21 PM

You can go PT and still receive Pell grants - the amount is just lower than FT.  Also, I'm attending a state university Ft and the Pell grants cover all but about $700 of my tuition (none of my books, obviously), so financially it's not all doom and gloom if she goes to the right school.


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#32 Liz CA

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Posted 11 August 2017 - 09:22 PM

She does not have the funds to attend the stat uni. She has to work. I doubt she can get such a stellar score on the ACT that the school woudl give her a free ride since her math education has been lacking. But it's a good though; she should look into it.

 

The local CCs do not offer enough online courses.

 

FAFSA could help with state university tuition. There are quite a few scholarships in some fields.

If she completes CC for her general ed, and is sufficiently motivated she may be able to enroll at an online university like FHSU that accepts payment plans. If she is good at self-pacing, learning by reading and resourceful, online is a possibility.



#33 Crimson Wife

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Posted 11 August 2017 - 09:42 PM

She can get emancipated from them, but would probably have to hire a lawyer.

 

Pretty sure that you cannot get emancipated over age 18. Our government really stinks when it comes to young adults who legitimately are independent of their parents (not dependent students fraudulently claiming "independent" status) getting financial aid. :(
 


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#34 Rach

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Posted 11 August 2017 - 09:47 PM

Depending on where she is from, one of the schools listed in this article may be a possibility: https://www.usnews.c...lleges?slide=15

UPS provides tuition and jobs at the University of Louisville and Jefferson Community and Tech school in Louisville, KY. They also offer tuition assistance in other locations. https://www.jobs-ups.../earn-and-learn

I'm guessing this won't apply for this student, but for anyone else who happens across this thread, Kentucky has the Work Ready program that will pay for you to receive an Associate's Degree in certain fields as long as you don't already have a 2 or 4 year degree. http://workreadykentucky.com
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#35 Laurie4b

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Posted 11 August 2017 - 09:47 PM

For someone lacking a math education, she might try Kahn Academy and learn online for free. It's not credit, but she could catch herself up in math. 

 


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#36 Liz CA

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Posted 11 August 2017 - 09:56 PM

She had at some point considered training to be a surgical technician (not sure I got the term right), but does not really feel called to it. Will have to revisit this and see what exactly the issue was. Thanks for the reminder.

 

ETA: But these programs are expensive, too. I looked at the local technical college (public): upward of $6,750/year for tuition; add fees and books and supplies for another 1.5-2k.

 

Again - I can just speak for CA but here technicians who do MRIs, CAT scans and plain old x-rays, etc. are in demand and I believe an AS degree may suffice.

 

However, I'd hate to see someone not move forward for financial reasons only. If you could be her math tutor, I am sure she would be able to CLEP out of various math related requirements. CLEP testing cost me around $80 per test - many years ago - so maybe a little more now but still quite a chunk less than one semester tuition for a 3 unit class.

Maybe I am wrong but I thought that Walden U also offered payment plans.Maybe someone who attended Walden can chime in.
 


Edited by Liz CA, 11 August 2017 - 09:57 PM.

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#37 KungFuPanda

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Posted 11 August 2017 - 10:06 PM

Will her parents fill in the fafsa paperwork? She may have a tough time going anywhere without it. They seem to be asking for it from everyone these days.
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#38 TechWife

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Posted 11 August 2017 - 10:21 PM

Will her parents fill in the fafsa paperwork? She may have a tough time going anywhere without it. They seem to be asking for it from everyone these days.


It's required when applying for scholarships grants and loans. We only did it one year so DS could apply for a scholarship. He didn't get it and we didn't qualify for any aid, so we didn't fill it out again.

Back when I was in school my parents refused to fill out the FAFSA - they considered it an invasion of privacy. They paid full freight for me for three years. Then, due to the business they owned failing, they had to declare bankruptcy and then they were willing to fill out the forms so I could continue college. They filled them out and I received a Pell that covered my tuition, room, board and fees. I only had to pay books. That was nearly thirty years ago, though. However, I do know from our experience with our son that they don't make you fill them out, but just don't expect any aid unless they are filled out.
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#39 Liz CA

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Posted 12 August 2017 - 12:13 AM

Agreeing with TechWife. It's always highly encouraged but not mandatory.

Perhaps her parents fear a mountain of paperwork as well. It's done online these days and does not take forever anymore.



#40 Carrie12345

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Posted 12 August 2017 - 04:44 AM

I know answers will vary by area and institution, but my local state U does have specific transfer agreements with ccs, which technically include CLEPs. However, there are requirements for the number of credits earned "on campus" (which includes online, but not any credits by exam) for both the cc and U.

Our cc also has their own credit by exam program, which includes more than just CLEP courses, but costs more than CLEP. (Less than regular tuition.)

To be most cost effective, they'd definitely need to talk to someone at all their options.
And a giant yes on Algebra!
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#41 Lecka

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Posted 12 August 2017 - 09:26 AM

My husband is in the process of getting an online degree, and I went to the education center with him recently.

If you start with an AA, you risk not all your classes transferring to 4-year requirements. You should check and see that your AA classes will transfer to meet 4-year requirements.

What you see is -- there are 3 classes that fulfill an AA requirement, but only one of them will fulfill a 4-year requirement, too.

He was at CTC (central Texas) and there they told him he had to take College Algebra to be able to have his math credit done for 4-year college.

Well, he has transferred to UMUC (Maryland) and they have 4-year degrees that don't require College Algebra.

For him, he submits his military experience and then different schools evaluate and give different amounts of credit. You can pick a school that gives more.

Different schools will evaluate your prior transcripts and work experience differently, so if she has a long-term goal she should work backwards to make things will transfer exactly where she wants to go.

We are in a situation where my husband has co-workers who are civilian contractors and doing the same job as he does, but they are required to have a 4-year degree. So my husband needs a degree to do the same job he does now.

So he has good experience and has been told his degree doesn't matter he just needs it to get in the door.

It is not the same attitude he would have if he were a young person starting out.

Anyway -- I think work backwards from long term goals, and make sure requirements will transfer.

It is not the mindset of doing the minimum to get a diploma. A lot of people I know are looking for that and then there are some on-line degrees that have different math requirements that people can try.

I don't know all the ins and outs but just for example at UMUC political science and history majors don't require College Algebra, so sometimes people choose them partly for that reason. But they require Stats which I don't know if it is really any easier? My husband took College Algebra already and it does meet his math requirement.
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#42 Lecka

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Posted 12 August 2017 - 09:32 AM

Also just our personal situation, but my husband's job (soldier) offers Tuition Assistance to pay for 14 or 16 credits a year. I forget which it is.

So if there are any jobs that offer tuition asisstance then that could help to pay tuition.

For the Army -- it can be hard sometimes to have time to take classes.

Also it does not pay for books, but UMUC uses online resources so students don't have to pay for books.

I am sure other schools do this too, so looking at how much students pay for books might be helpful.

But this is a point they make to soldiers whose only out-of-pocket expense is books, if they are using Tuition Assistance.

#43 Rach

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Posted 12 August 2017 - 09:58 AM

So if there are any jobs that offer tuition asisstance then that could help to pay tuition.


Yes, check to see if the school she wants to attend offers tuition assistance to full time employees. The university I used to work for would pay for 2 classes per semester. They still offer that benefit but now also offer tuition discounts at 10% per year of service for a maximum of 50% off after 5 years which can be used by the employee or by family members.

There is a small private college near me that also offers free tuition to employees and their children although I don't know the details.
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#44 regentrude

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Posted 12 August 2017 - 11:01 AM

Yes, check to see if the school she wants to attend offers tuition assistance to full time employees. The university I used to work for would pay for 2 classes per semester. They still offer that benefit but now also offer tuition discounts at 10% per year of service for a maximum of 50% off after 5 years which can be used by the employee or by family members.

There is a small private college near me that also offers free tuition to employees and their children although I don't know the details.

 

We have a severe budget crisis, and the local uni is laying off staff. They also would not hire somebody for something their own students could do. Tuition is reduced by 50% for employees, making it stil more expensive than CC.


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#45 regentrude

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Posted 12 August 2017 - 11:03 AM

I will ask about FAFSA. I think the parents would be willing to provide their info.

Still, I don't see how it can work being a FT student. Surely, grant assistance will not pay for living expenses and transportation. At present, she is opposed to the idea of taking loans. I will discuss this with her.



#46 Liz CA

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Posted 12 August 2017 - 11:13 AM

My husband is in the process of getting an online degree, and I went to the education center with him recently.

If you start with an AA, you risk not all your classes transferring to 4-year requirements. You should check and see that your AA classes will transfer to meet 4-year requirements.

What you see is -- there are 3 classes that fulfill an AA requirement, but only one of them will fulfill a 4-year requirement, too.
 

 

Yes, this is important if she knows she is definitely going for the BA / BS. I happen to get an AS on the way to the BS but she may not want to spend money on classes that do not transfer.

 

This is why it's important to meet with a counselor and have him/her map out the transfer requirements in her state.



#47 elegantlion

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Posted 12 August 2017 - 11:30 AM

I will ask about FAFSA. I think the parents would be willing to provide their info.

Still, I don't see how it can work being a FT student. Surely, grant assistance will not pay for living expenses and transportation. At present, she is opposed to the idea of taking loans. I will discuss this with her.

 

Much of that will depend upon her parent's EFC. 



#48 umsami

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Posted 12 August 2017 - 01:24 PM

How old is she? Some states will let homeschool students do dual-enrollment, which would allow her to get her AA degree (or close) to free.

 

Similarly, in Florida, I believe homeschool students are eligible for Bright Futures scholarships.

 

There are a few tuition free colleges.  One in Kentucky comes to mine.  Berea.  

Work study or co-op programs if available are a good idea.   Also mining the scholarship opportunities.  

 

15 companies that help employees pay for college. 

 

 



#49 maize

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Posted 12 August 2017 - 11:12 PM

Amazon is another company that offers tuition assistance, jobs at fulfillment centers are not super competitive to get.

#50 regentrude

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Posted 13 August 2017 - 06:49 AM

How old is she? Some states will let homeschool students do dual-enrollment, which would allow her to get her AA degree (or close) to free.

 

Similarly, in Florida, I believe homeschool students are eligible for Bright Futures scholarships.

 

There are a few tuition free colleges.  One in Kentucky comes to mine.  Berea.  

Work study or co-op programs if available are a good idea.   Also mining the scholarship opportunities.  

 

15 companies that help employees pay for college. 

 

Thanks. She has graduated homeschool. Our state does not offer free DE; we pay in full. She needs to stay local. No employers who pay for college.


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