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professors - teachers - doctors, oh my!


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#1 hopskipjump

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Posted 07 August 2017 - 12:32 AM

Stupid question here. Going to ask anyway. :D

 

Are all college "teachers" professors? Or only those who have doctorates? And then, do you call the "teacher" Dr So-and-So or Professor So-and-So (assuming you're not being properly introduced and have to wing it?)

 

I'd assumed they are all Professors - and those with doctorates, you call Doctor instead of Professor...

 

...but I'm not positive and dd is asleep and this question keeps rattling around in my head and I have an email to send and need to know. :p

 

 


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#2 Arcadia

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Posted 07 August 2017 - 12:41 AM

I'd assumed they are all Professors - and those with doctorates, you call Doctor instead of Professor...

All my university lecturers with the Prof. title also have a PhD. They get the Dr. title before the Assoc Prof title then the Prof. title. The tippy top are Emeritus Prof.

This link explains quite nicely https://www.bu.edu/h...nks-and-titles/

ETA:
I can remember faces very well but not names. I ask for their business cards and address them with whatever title is on their card.
When one of my lecturers was promoted to Professor, he didn't care that people still address him as Dr "his last name" instead of Prof "his last name".

Edited by Arcadia, 07 August 2017 - 12:51 AM.

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#3 Jean in Newcastle

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Posted 07 August 2017 - 12:55 AM

No, not all are professors. They were pretty good at telling us if they were lecturers or professors or doctor the first day.


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#4 hopskipjump

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Posted 07 August 2017 - 12:59 AM

All my university lecturers with the Prof. title also have a PhD. They get the Dr. title before the Assoc Prof title then the Prof. title. The tippy top are Emeritus Prof.

This link explains quite nicely https://www.bu.edu/h...nks-and-titles/

ETA:
I can remember faces very well but not names. I ask for their business cards and address them with whatever title is on their card.
When one of my lecturers was promoted to Professor, he didn't care that people still address him as Dr "his last name" instead of Prof "his last name".

 

Great! Will have to read that link when my brain is more awake though. It's all blending in together! lol

 

I'd have thought Dr trumped Prof. lol Shows what I know! Will read the link in the morning and be a wiser person. Thanks! :)

 

Would you actually CALL or type/email someone "Assoc. Prof. So-and-So"? Or would you just call them "Professor"? Are the Assoc/Emeritus distinctions purely for title/nameplate purposes or do people actually call them by those distinctions?



#5 hopskipjump

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Posted 07 August 2017 - 01:01 AM

No, not all are professors. They were pretty good at telling us if they were lecturers or professors or doctor the first day.


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So then, they are college teachers? And, of course, have Mr/Ms distinctions?

 

(This is reminding me of how people often call a policeman or patrolman a police officer... when they're not all officers. lol)
 



#6 TarynB

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Posted 07 August 2017 - 01:07 AM

So then, they are college teachers? And, of course, have Mr/Ms distinctions?

(This is reminding me of how people often call a policeman or patrolman a police officer... when they're not all officers. lol)

Here, without a PhD, they'd be referred to as *instructors* (not teachers) and addressed as Mr/Mrs/Ms.

Edited by TarynB, 07 August 2017 - 01:10 AM.

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#7 Arcadia

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Posted 07 August 2017 - 01:22 AM

Would you actually CALL or type/email someone "Assoc. Prof. So-and-So"? Or would you just call them "Professor"? Are the Assoc/Emeritus distinctions purely for title/nameplate purposes or do people actually call them by those distinctions?


For official email and formal introductions, my alma mater tends to use the full title. For very formal introductions, we will hear something like "Associate Professor So-and-So, vice-dean of electrical engineering".

For informal email and conversations, my former lecturers prefer that we just address them as Dr.

#8 Ivey

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Posted 07 August 2017 - 03:11 AM

When I was in university (in Canada), we never called anyone "Professor Lastname" or anything similar. Anyone with a PhD was "Dr. Lastname", and anyone without a PhD was "Mr./Ms. Lastname". I'll have to ask my kids tomorrow what norm is here in Texas. 


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#9 Gwen in VA

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Posted 07 August 2017 - 05:29 AM

I think it is a local thing.

 

At my college in New England, all professors were called Professor So-and-so.

 

At my kids' college in Virginia, all professors were called Dr. So-and-so, unless they didn't have a Ph.D.. In that case, they were referred to as Professor So-and-So. (They had two who were in the process of finishing up their Ph.D.'s).

 

Most professors tell their students at the beginning of the year what they want to be called. If a person has a Ph.D., either Prof or Dr. is totally appropriate, but there seems to be some regional variation on which is preferred!

 

 


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#10 regentrude

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Posted 07 August 2017 - 09:03 AM

 The tippy top are Emeritus Prof.

 

Emeritus has nothing to do with the quality. It can only be bestowed once the prof has retired.

The most tippy top prof, if still in her active career, will not have an emeritus title.


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#11 regentrude

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Posted 07 August 2017 - 09:07 AM

Some instructors (peferred term to "teacher") are graduate Teachng Assistants, some are lecturers, some are professors. 

Not all professors have a PhD - depends on college and discipline. Tenure track professors usually do; teaching professors in some disciplines only have a masters.

 

 



#12 Laura Corin

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Posted 07 August 2017 - 10:02 AM

And the UK has a whole different nomenclature.


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#13 luuknam

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Posted 07 August 2017 - 10:59 AM

Would you actually CALL or type/email someone "Assoc. Prof. So-and-So"? Or would you just call them "Professor"? 

 

 

I would not call someone Associate Prof So-and-So... that would seem (to me) that you're stressing the fact that they're 'only' associate professors, which doesn't seem like a great idea. So, yeah... if they have a PhD (or probably any other D, like JD or MD), Prof. or Dr. So-and-So, if they don't have a PhD or other D, Mr/Ms/Mrs So-and-So. And yes, I've had some instructors/lecturers who only had a BS or BA (not sure I've had one with only an MS/MA, but obviously they exist). 


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#14 JennyD

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Posted 07 August 2017 - 12:24 PM

IMO, you can almost never go wrong by addressing a US college teacher as "Professor," so when in doubt, go with that.

I have a doctorate and am a non-tenure track faculty member at a law school. My title is "lecturer." In describing myself, I say either that I am a "lecturer" or that "I teach at x school." Students call me "Professor Lastname." Occasionally students from other disciplines call me "Doctor last name," which I find a little odd but perfectly fine.

When staff members call me Professor Lastname I ask them to please call me by my first name. Same for graduated students.
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#15 fdrinca

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Posted 07 August 2017 - 01:25 PM

It also varies by local school custom.

 

DH and I were referred to as "Professor" at two institutions.

 

At a research institution, I was referred to by name, published with PhD at the end, although I was working with peers and graduate students, all of whom have the norm of addressing me by my given name rather than an honorific or formal form.

 

Currently, DH is at a university where students refer to instructors as "Dr," which still sounds odd to my ears. 

 

You can probably find the instructor's preferred title on the syllabus. 

 

ETA: I feel most instructors would not take offense to any respectful title and would ask other adults to refer to them by given name. 


Edited by fdrinca, 07 August 2017 - 01:30 PM.


#16 regentrude

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Posted 07 August 2017 - 02:06 PM

I feel most instructors would not take offense to any respectful title and would ask other adults to refer to them by given name. 

 

as in, first name?

 

Nope. Not for large freshmen intro courses. While some students may be able to understand the asymmetry of the relationship, many, especially beginning, students have trouble when the lines are blurred by being on first name basis. I have seen this repeatedly, it was one of the first pieces of advice I received as a young instructor, and in hindsight I consider it a wise advice.


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#17 jdahlquist

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Posted 07 August 2017 - 09:52 PM

I have found the use of the term "professor" used many different ways at different universities.  

 

If you know that the person has a doctorate, I would refer to the individual as "Dr. X"  If you don't know, I would refer to the individual as "Prof. X"  

 

Someone's title for their job may be Assistant Professor of Mathematics, Associate Professor of Biology or Professor of Economics or even something like Associate Professor of Professional Practice in Marketing.  But, you would not refer to that individual as "Assistant Prof. X"  

 

I taught at one school where about 1/2 of those who had a J.D. went by Dr. X and the other half said that it was incorrect for someone with a J.D. to use the term "Doctor" and preferred to go by Prof. X.   So, there isn't a straightforward, generally accepted answer.  


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#18 GGardner

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Posted 07 August 2017 - 10:15 PM

 

 

I taught at one school where about 1/2 of those who had a J.D. went by Dr. X and the other half said that it was incorrect for someone with a J.D. to use the term "Doctor" and preferred to go by Prof. X.   So, there isn't a straightforward, generally accepted answer.  

 

 

Wow!  IMHO, calling a law professor with "just' a JD, "Dr."  is wrong.  (Yes, I know what the "D" in "JD" stands for).  But this is such a different degree from any kind of PhD  -- a JD is a three year program where to get the degree you have to prove that you've mastered some existing knowledge, compared to a PhD, where you have to show that you've done original research in some way.



#19 Hoggirl

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Posted 07 August 2017 - 10:35 PM

Wow! IMHO, calling a law professor with "just' a JD, "Dr." is wrong. (Yes, I know what the "D" in "JD" stands for). But this is such a different degree from any kind of PhD -- a JD is a three year program where to get the degree you have to prove that you've mastered some existing knowledge, compared to a PhD, where you have to show that you've done original research in some way.

A medical degree is the same way, only four years instead of three. Vet, Dental degrees, too. I bet you call those individuals "doctors."

However, at my law school, everyone was referred to as, "Professor" except my property professor who had an SJD. He was referred to as, "Doctor."

Edited by Hoggirl, 08 August 2017 - 06:26 AM.

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#20 fdrinca

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Posted 07 August 2017 - 11:49 PM

as in, first name?

 

Nope. Not for large freshmen intro courses. While some students may be able to understand the asymmetry of the relationship, many, especially beginning, students have trouble when the lines are blurred by being on first name basis. I have seen this repeatedly, it was one of the first pieces of advice I received as a young instructor, and in hindsight I consider it a wise advice.

 

 

Ambiguous meaning of "adult" in my original post. Adult =/= typical undergraduate. 



#21 regentrude

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Posted 07 August 2017 - 11:57 PM

Ambiguous meaning of "adult" in my original post. Adult =/= typical undergraduate. 

 

Ah, OK. I see what you mean. Sure, first names for anybody who is not my student (and not my boss' boss, unless he is also offering to be called by first name)



#22 jdahlquist

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Posted 08 August 2017 - 12:58 AM

DH and I were professors at the same university.  Many times I would have students come by my office and say, "Mrs. Smith, do you know when Dr. Jones will be in?"  He never got students asking him, "Mr. Jones, do you know when Dr. Smith will be in?"  (It clearly stated on my office door and my syllabus that I was 'Dr. Smith.')  He served as the director of the MBA program and was followed by a female professor serving as MBA director.  She complained that she repeatedly had students say, "Mrs. Brown, when Dr. Jones was MBA director..."  or worse, "Sally, when Dr. Jones was MBA director..."  



#23 Hoggirl

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Posted 08 August 2017 - 06:31 AM

DH and I were professors at the same university. Many times I would have students come by my office and say, "Mrs. Smith, do you know when Dr. Jones will be in?" He never got students asking him, "Mr. Jones, do you know when Dr. Smith will be in?" (It clearly stated on my office door and my syllabus that I was 'Dr. Smith.') He served as the director of the MBA program and was followed by a female professor serving as MBA director. She complained that she repeatedly had students say, "Mrs. Brown, when Dr. Jones was MBA director..." or worse, "Sally, when Dr. Jones was MBA director..."


Boo.

When one of my friends earned her PhD, her husband jokingly asked how he should refer to her. She replied, "You can call me whatever you like as long as you precede it with the title, "Doctor." He responded with, "I'll call you, 'Dr. Butt head,' then." Lol. She told him that would be fine.

#24 GGardner

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Posted 08 August 2017 - 07:53 AM

A medical degree is the same way, only four years instead of three. Vet, Dental degrees, too. I bet you call those individuals "doctors."

However, at my law school, everyone was referred to as, "Professor" except my property professor who had an SJD. He was referred to as, "Doctor."

 

But MDs, DDSes etc. are "medical doctors", even if the word "medical" is rarely pronounced.  Different category altogether.

 

I bet that in the history of American jurisprudence, no judge has ever addressed an attorney as "Dr. Lastname", just because of a JD.


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#25 Hoggirl

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Posted 08 August 2017 - 08:02 AM

But MDs, DDSes etc. are "medical doctors", even if the word "medical" is rarely pronounced. Different category altogether.

I bet that in the history of American jurisprudence, no judge has ever addressed an attorney as "Dr. Lastname", just because of a JD.


Oh, you're right. I was just pointing out that those medical degrees don't come with original, academic research either. I thought that was your standard. Sorry if I misunderstood.
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#26 Bluegoat

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Posted 08 August 2017 - 09:42 AM

No one here uses the title "professor" normally.  It would be Dr or Mr/Ms.  You might see it in a letter heading or something similar, but then it would be the specific job title, like assistant-professor or senior lecturer

 

Sometimes if you look at the departmental web page for the person you ill see what to call them.



#27 TechWife

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Posted 10 August 2017 - 11:06 AM

But MDs, DDSes etc. are "medical doctors", even if the word "medical" is rarely pronounced. Different category altogether.

I bet that in the history of American jurisprudence, no judge has ever addressed an attorney as "Dr. Lastname", just because of a JD.

JD is Juris Doctor, or Doctor of Jurisprudence. Even through I agree it isn't common to call an attorney "Doctor," your rationale doesn't make sense.

Edited by TechWife, 10 August 2017 - 11:07 AM.


#28 prairiewindmomma

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Posted 10 August 2017 - 11:25 AM

But MDs, DDSes etc. are "medical doctors", even if the word "medical" is rarely pronounced.  Different category altogether.

 

I bet that in the history of American jurisprudence, no judge has ever addressed an attorney as "Dr. Lastname", just because of a JD.

 

I think you're beating a dead horse, and know it.

 

Judges refer to counsel as Counsellors, or the attorney for ______, or Prosecutor/Defense.  Judges are called "The Honorable ______, Your Honor, or Mr. Justice ______/Mrs. Justice _____ or Judge ______.   It's a completely different system.

 

Esq. only refers to a practicing attorney, in his or her role as representative counsel. It is a courtesy title.  JD is an academic title.  While it is rare for an attorney to request to be addressed as Dr. _____________, it does happen.

 

Pharmacists are in the same boat, with their Pharm.D. degree (although many of them are BA + 1 year to get their Pharm.D.). They rarely choose the title Dr., but are entitled to do so if they choose.



#29 G5052

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Posted 11 August 2017 - 12:12 PM

Officially at the community colleges where I've worked, the titles go like this: Lecturer, Associate Professor, Assistant Professor, and Professor. It all depends on your education and experience. Most part-timers and those without full-time college teaching start as Lecturers. Promotions are based on how many credits you're taught and your ratings.

 

My son has had only had one professor who had them use a first name. I don't have my doctorate, and go by "Professor Jones" because I think it sets a tone of respect. Teaching at the community college level can be challenging enough with open admissions and a wide range of backgrounds. I teach in a male-dominated field and sometimes struggle with male students who clearly don't respect female professors. So I start formal and stay formal. When I was in the classroom and a student raised their hand and said "Hey Prof," I told them that "Hey Prof" isn't my name and kept going. 


Edited by G5052, 11 August 2017 - 12:12 PM.


#30 Sadie

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Posted 15 August 2017 - 08:52 PM

'Lecturer' is the term used for teaching staff here, whether or not they are actually a professor or a teaching assistant or what-the-heck ever. Most students would say 'My economics lecturer' or 'my psychology lecturer'.

 

And no-one uses the formal address of Ms/Mrs/Mr/Dr - first names everywhere I've been.. I've never emailed a lecturer using anything other than 'Dear Fred' (for example) and never had anything signed other than 'Regards, Fred.' 

 

 Big cultural differences here (AU) I think.

 

 



#31 katilac

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Posted 15 August 2017 - 11:31 PM

Professor is the default term around here if they don't specify, and of course if they introduce themselves that way. 

 

My kids' classes have been pretty evenly divided between professor, doctor, and first name. I don't think there have been any Mr. or Ms. Last Names. 



#32 *LC

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Posted 16 August 2017 - 12:33 AM

as in, first name?
 
Nope. Not for large freshmen intro courses. While some students may be able to understand the asymmetry of the relationship, many, especially beginning, students have trouble when the lines are blurred by being on first name basis. I have seen this repeatedly, it was one of the first pieces of advice I received as a young instructor, and in hindsight I consider it a wise advice.

 


My kids' classes have been pretty evenly divided between professor, doctor, and first name. I don't think there have been any Mr. or Ms. Last Names.


I haven't noticed what my kids use for their teachers.

I do know most of the professors in my major went by their first name. (I was too shy to call them by their first names, so I avoided calling them anything. I think I started all conversations with hello or excuse me.) I do know that two of the professors in the department went by Dr. Jones and Dr. Smith. They may have been the only professors who had doctorates. All my professors came from industry rather than academia, even the ones with doctorates. I don't remember any difference in how the professors were treated or though about; I was lucky all these professors were approachable. My non-shy classmates, hung out in their offices just talking/asking advice.)

In the past month, two different professors came up in conversation with two different old classmates, both professors were referred to by their first names by my classmates.

Another old classmate is now a professor in our major at a top-30 school, his students refer to him by his first name on the rate-my-professor website. He has won numerous teaching awards during his 10+ years at the school.

So, I wonder if the type of class taught makes a difference in how a professor is addressed.

#33 Laura Corin

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Posted 16 August 2017 - 01:12 AM

'Lecturer' is the term used for teaching staff here, whether or not they are actually a professor or a teaching assistant or what-the-heck ever. Most students would say 'My economics lecturer' or 'my psychology lecturer'.

And no-one uses the formal address of Ms/Mrs/Mr/Dr - first names everywhere I've been.. I've never emailed a lecturer using anything other than 'Dear Fred' (for example) and never had anything signed other than 'Regards, Fred.'

Big cultural differences here (AU) I think.


That's the same in the UK, in my experience. Oxford is a bit different though - they tend to use 'tutor' more, because the tutorial system is the key teaching mode.
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#34 jdahlquist

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Posted 16 August 2017 - 01:47 AM

 


Another old classmate is now a professor in our major at a top-30 school, his students refer to him by his first name on the rate-my-professor website. He has won numerous teaching awards during his 10+ years at the school.

 

It does depend on the demographics of the students and of the faculty and the culture of the school.  Unfortunately, I think a bias exists--calling John by his first name, rather than Dr. Jones, means he is cool, approachable, humble.  Calling Sally by her first name, rather than Dr. Smith, means that she is not taken as seriously.  


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#35 regentrude

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Posted 16 August 2017 - 07:58 AM

It does depend on the demographics of the students and of the faculty and the culture of the school.  Unfortunately, I think a bias exists--calling John by his first name, rather than Dr. Jones, means he is cool, approachable, humble.  Calling Sally by her first name, rather than Dr. Smith, means that she is not taken as seriously.  

 

This.

Just like the male prof lecturing in jeans is cool and relaxed, but the female prof gets comments on her teaching evals about the way she dresses.


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#36 Sadie

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Posted 16 August 2017 - 08:00 AM

That's the same in the UK, in my experience. Oxford is a bit different though - they tend to use 'tutor' more, because the tutorial system is the key teaching mode.

 

Yes, I forgot to say that here we have both lecturers and tutors - one lectures, and the other gives tutorials :) Nice and simple. 



#37 G5052

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Posted 16 August 2017 - 08:27 AM

This.

 

Just like the male prof lecturing in jeans is cool and relaxed, but the female prof gets comments on her teaching evals about the way she dresses.

 

When we got back paper evals from the students I always had a comment or two about my clothes each semester. I just laughed. I doubt they ever did that with a male professor. Now the evals are electronic and more focused, and I haven't gotten that since. Or the times have changed some for the better.

 

We once had a multi-campus workshop day with my department (information technology/computer science). The department head (I'll call her "J") and I were the only women. It shocked me during a guided discussion on classroom management in the computer lab how "J" and I had some classroom issues that the men rarely had. It was very clear that we were dealing with a sex-based dynamic. "J" often commented to me afterwards how eye-opening that was. "J" has since retired, but we remain in contact. She was frankly the best supervisor I ever had.

 

I now work for a female friend of "J" as an online professor, and we've had the same conversations. She has a doctorate and goes by "Dr." and told me early on to always go by "Professor Jones" with no first name, even teaching online.

 

However, I am a "hot" professor on ratemyprofessor.com, so I must be doing something right. Several students even said "Professor Jones" in their review.


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#38 Bluegoat

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Posted 16 August 2017 - 10:56 AM

Yes, I forgot to say that here we have both lecturers and tutors - one lectures, and the other gives tutorials :) Nice and simple. 

 

We had tutors at my college - they gave group tutorials and tutored individual students as well.  But that was the informal job description, you wouldn't call someone "Tutor Smith."  He'd be either Dr. Smith, Mr/Ms, or go by his first name, which seemed in part to relate to age.  The official job designation could be some kind of fellow, at the lower end, up to some sort of tenured professorship.


Edited by Bluegoat, 16 August 2017 - 10:57 AM.

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#39 Laura Corin

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Posted 16 August 2017 - 12:02 PM

We had tutors at my college - they gave group tutorials and tutored individual students as well.  But that was the informal job description, you wouldn't call someone "Tutor Smith."  He'd be either Dr. Smith, Mr/Ms, or go by his first name, which seemed in part to relate to age.  The official job designation could be some kind of fellow, at the lower end, up to some sort of tenured professorship.

 

 

You're right, however, the formal titles (Dr, Mr/Ms, Professor) are not much used, in my experience, in the UK.  First name terms at both the older universities that I am familiar with now and the more modern university that I went to 35 years ago.

 

The job levels normally run (from lowest to highest) postdoctoral fellow, lecturer, senior lecturer, reader, professor.  A tutor might be a PhD student or a member of staff, depending on that university's habits.  All who lecture are, informally, lecturers.


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#40 daijobu

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Posted 18 August 2017 - 12:44 AM

 

However, I am a "hot" professor on ratemyprofessor.com, so I must be doing something right. Several students even said "Professor Jones" in their review.

 

Congratulations on being "hot!"

 

What is you estimation of the quality of the reviews on ratemyprofessor?  



#41 regentrude

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Posted 18 August 2017 - 06:40 AM

What is you estimation of the quality of the reviews on ratemyprofessor?  

 

Your question was not directed at me, but I'd like to weigh in here, too.

 

The reviews typically come from students who either really liked the course or who hated the course and did not do well. There are rarely reviews in the middle. 

Students with a grudge are usually easy to spot - by the language they use, and by the ridiculous complaints. I had a student complain that I only spend three hours helping them with their weekly homework.

Not everything a student thinks happened did actually happen. For example, on my end of year evals, I get complaints that I work more examples in one section than in another - which is nonsense; the sections cover identical content. Or that tests are completely unlike the homework (all homework problems are former test questions)

I would pay attention to the mix. I would take negative comments seriously if there is a consistent pattern and if they are specific. If most students complain that the prof is unprepared or gives tests over material that was not covered, I'd take note. But I would disregard any comments like "this instructor sucks".

 

It is important to realize that the  percentage of students who leave reviews is extremely small. I have taught well over 4,000 students, but have around 40 reviews - so about 1%. It does not constitute a representative or statistically significant sample. Going by patterns of comments is your best option.


Edited by regentrude, 18 August 2017 - 06:45 AM.

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#42 G5052

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Posted 18 August 2017 - 07:21 AM

Congratulations on being "hot!"

 

What is you estimation of the quality of the reviews on ratemyprofessor?  

 

As regentrude said, look for a pattern. DS and I looked at some of his professors in community college, and there was an element of truth to each one. The disorganized professor, the angry professor, the caring professor, the clear professor. It was all there.

 

Of course you'll get the "worse ever" and "first class I've failed," but look beyond that.

 

Under a previous dean, a homeschooling and adjunct friend of mine was not renewed for poor ratings on the site and for having too many grading grievances. When I looked at the comments, ratemyprofessor myself, it was obvious that the students didn't want to work and chafed against late policies, not having open book tests, etc.


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#43 Kassia

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Posted 18 August 2017 - 07:44 AM

We also look for a pattern.  If there are just a few bad reviews, we figure those are just disgruntled students who didn't do well for whatever reason.  But, if there are consistent bad reviews with the same complaints then we know there is an issue.  Same with consistently positive reviews - that's an instructor we want!  


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#44 Bluegoat

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Posted 18 August 2017 - 08:09 PM

One thing I've noticed with reviews is that some of the most interesting teachers I had tended to have people who became upset about things they had said.  Because they said things that were different than what you hear everywhere.

 

Anyway, in general they seem to me rather like reviews of doctors - occasionally helpful but a lot of the time they say more about the person giving the review than the doctor or professor.  


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#45 Bluegoat

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Posted 18 August 2017 - 08:10 PM

You're right, however, the formal titles (Dr, Mr/Ms, Professor) are not much used, in my experience, in the UK.  First name terms at both the older universities that I am familiar with now and the more modern university that I went to 35 years ago.

 

The job levels normally run (from lowest to highest) postdoctoral fellow, lecturer, senior lecturer, reader, professor.  A tutor might be a PhD student or a member of staff, depending on that university's habits.  All who lecture are, informally, lecturers.

 

Yeah.  I guess the thing with titles is, what are you using it for?  It's different if you are talking to someone rather than writing them a letter, say.


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#46 elegantlion

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Posted 19 August 2017 - 07:41 AM

At my school, we use Doctor for anyone with a PhD, Professor for those who are not. We have very few graduate programs, so I haven't been in any courses taught by TAs, but from what I've heard, they use Mr./Ms/Mrs.

 

Even as a student who is older or the same age as most of my professors, I use their title. I have one professor who sometimes signs his emails with his first name, but I always refer to them as Dr. Our informal department rule is once you graduate, you can refer to them by first name. 

 

I've been working in a different department this summer, some professors have PhDs, some do not. I've been trying to refer to them by Dr. if they have the title, which feels odd sometimes because everyone else is a co-worker and refers to them by first name.