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I Hate Required Access Codes! (JAWM)


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#1 Crimson Wife

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Posted 06 August 2017 - 06:21 PM

2/3 of oldest DD's DE courses this fall require access codes. The total is $230. The tuition for these two courses is only $368 so it increases the cost of taking them by more than 60%. :glare:


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#2 G5052

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Posted 06 August 2017 - 07:43 PM

Believe me, it's a mixed bag for the professors.

 

It can provide some positives beyond class. When I taught basic computer literacy, the students could do practice exercises and homework and get immediate feedback by uploading their work. No waiting for the professor, and I usually set it up for three tries so they could get it right. IMHO when that innovation came it was a positive.

 

However, I could count on 25% coming to class when we set it up without an access code. In some cases, they hadn't put it into the budget.

 

Ds bought an access code last fall that the professor swore he needed. I told him NOT to use it until the professor said. YUP. They never used it. I've had it for sale on Amazon since. I guess it's too obscure.

 

My freshman needs three access codes: computer literary, math, and Spanish. Her codes and books are going to be around $600.

 

DS is a junior, and some of his are actually rolled into a fee per class at the business school, so I have no idea how much they really are. Thankfully his books will be about $350. He's paying for his books, parking pass, a laptop, and incidentals.

 

CHA-CHING!


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#3 Kassia

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Posted 06 August 2017 - 08:03 PM

I totally agree with you.  Hate them because of the cost.  



#4 momofjep

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Posted 06 August 2017 - 08:54 PM

Agreed! 2/4 of my DS's say they are required. I'm going to wait until after the first day to make sure. 


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#5 katilac

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Posted 06 August 2017 - 10:35 PM

Over $1,000 on books and codes for dd's freshman year! Codes were as much as books, and I think they were actually more. Both of them needed some in DE, but that's a definite record. 

 

The beginning foreign language ones drive them crazy. It's super simple stuff that could be done with a $10 workbook. It's an insanely expensive way to spoon feed the students who won't study on their own. 

 

 


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#6 hopskipjump

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Posted 07 August 2017 - 12:12 AM

AGREED! ESPECIALLY those classes that SAY it's required... but when the class actually happens, they never use the [email protected] code. WTH?!?! We don't have money to just throw to the wind like that!!!

 

The cost difference for one of dds classes (anatomy) is a $17 used textbook vs $299 with the code. We're waiting to buy it at the school bookstore if she can find out if she really needs that code or not. We did buy the statistics book that was $250 with the code vs $45 without. :cursing:  For a MATH book?!? MATH DOESN'T CHANGE!!! There's no reason for a $250 MATH book!

 

I don't get it. DD says there are quizzes, etc that they are supposed to do. I have a feeling she didn't even bother last year (even though she used the codes, I didn't investigate how much she utilized the activities - but they really sound like "optional" or "enhancement" activities, which she usually doesn't need).

 

How did teachers manage to teach BEFORE this without these stupid programs? There used to be checkpoint quizzes IN THE TEXTBOOK! Why aren't those good enough??

 

growl. It makes the books ridiculously expensive and zaps the resale value to $0.

 

(obviously grouchy because we just finished paying for a whoppingly expensive semester as far as books go... :glare: )


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#7 Melissa in NC

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Posted 07 August 2017 - 06:30 AM

I strongly encourage everyone to go to the first class before buying the code. My dd had a class that listed the need for online access but the individual teacher did not use it. Grrrr.

 

Last semester we did have a Pearson Math book from her older sister and her teacher did use the on line access. She was able to log onto her class account as a guest (available as a guest for 2 weeks) then click on a link to buy the access directly from Pearson. It save us about $20 from buying from the bookstore.


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#8 elegantlion

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Posted 07 August 2017 - 06:50 AM

 

 

growl. It makes the books ridiculously expensive and zaps the resale value to $0.

 

 

 

:iagree: I hate this part. I've been fortunate that if it's required, it gets used, but then no one wants the book. Neither one of us have access codes required for this upcoming semester. 



#9 beckyjo

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Posted 07 August 2017 - 06:58 AM

I'm paying for 3 cc classes this semester (dd has 2 DE classes, DH has 1). 2 out of the 3 books have access codes causing books to cost well over $300 for 3 books, even though I found the non-coded book for $27. Last semester, dd took her first DE course, and it required a custom book with a code that cost us over $150 (and was worth $0 after the semester as they changed the custom text after the semester ended). Bleah!

 

I've purchased 2 of the 3 books so far, and this next paycheck will pay for the third. DD will probably will take DH's class at some point, and I will have to re-buy the dang code! Makes me cranky. 



#10 luuknam

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Posted 07 August 2017 - 11:02 AM

Not sure this needs a JAWM.  :lol:

 

But yes! I don't know anybody who loves access codes, other than publishers (and I don't know any publishers). 


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#11 SparklyUnicorn

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Posted 07 August 2017 - 11:06 AM

I hate this too.  The one I tried was quite lousy too!

 

 



#12 jdahlquist

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Posted 07 August 2017 - 10:19 PM

AGREED! ESPECIALLY those classes that SAY it's required... but when the class actually happens, they never use the [email protected]<script data-cfhash='f9e31' type="text/javascript">/* */</script> code. WTH?!?! We don't have money to just throw to the wind like that!!!

 

The cost difference for one of dds classes (anatomy) is a $17 used textbook vs $299 with the code. We're waiting to buy it at the school bookstore if she can find out if she really needs that code or not. We did buy the statistics book that was $250 with the code vs $45 without. :cursing:  For a MATH book?!? MATH DOESN'T CHANGE!!! There's no reason for a $250 MATH book!

 

I don't get it. DD says there are quizzes, etc that they are supposed to do. I have a feeling she didn't even bother last year (even though she used the codes, I didn't investigate how much she utilized the activities - but they really sound like "optional" or "enhancement" activities, which she usually doesn't need).

 

How did teachers manage to teach BEFORE this without these stupid programs? There used to be checkpoint quizzes IN THE TEXTBOOK! Why aren't those good enough??

 

growl. It makes the books ridiculously expensive and zaps the resale value to $0.

 

(obviously grouchy because we just finished paying for a whoppingly expensive semester as far as books go... :glare: )

You may want to check and see if you can purchased the code separately.  Purchasing the code directly from the publishers and buying a used textbook without the code is often the cheapest combination.


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#13 jdahlquist

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Posted 07 August 2017 - 10:50 PM

I am curious if anyone has used the codes for materials beyond what is required as a graded component in a class.  If so, was it helpful?

 

The codes that come with the finance and economics textbooks that I used have many additional resources than what I assign as required components.  There are videos that students can watch, assessment quizzes, adaptive learning exercises, and many other items.  The publishers claim that they are helpful and that they are especially useful with the "way this generation learns."  

 

However, the more I used the online materials for the classes I teach, the less useful I was finding them.  I did teach at a university where the codes (and online assignments) were a requirement set at the departmental level.  Now that I am at a school with smaller classes, I am not requiring students to purchase a code (and I am not aware of many using the online materials on their own.)


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#14 regentrude

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Posted 07 August 2017 - 11:15 PM

I despise the trend. I hate the entire textbook racket that forces high prices on students for little value. Basically, the college saves manpower in grading by having students buy access to automatic homework grading systems which do a much poorer job than human graders who would be able to assess complex problems.

 

I refuse to use the automatic grading system with my classes, do not require thea ccess code, and recommend that students use one of teh older editions of the text.


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#15 MerryAtHope

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Posted 07 August 2017 - 11:52 PM

2/3 of oldest DD's DE courses this fall require access codes. The total is $230. The tuition for these two courses is only $368 so it increases the cost of taking them by more than 60%. :glare:

 

I hear ya. I'm trying not to think about how much books with access codes for 2 students is adding up this year...and that's WITH saving some $$$ buying used/renting what I could!



#16 FaithManor

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Posted 11 August 2017 - 06:19 AM

I hate them too. Ds's school required them in four courses last semester and not ONE professor used them. GRRRRR.....I could have gone used without access code and saved a bundle of money. I swear sometimes college administrators are in bed with textbook sales associates.


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#17 DawnM

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Posted 11 August 2017 - 06:25 AM

I strongly encourage everyone to go to the first class before buying the code. My dd had a class that listed the need for online access but the individual teacher did not use it. Grrrr.

 

Last semester we did have a Pearson Math book from her older sister and her teacher did use the on line access. She was able to log onto her class account as a guest (available as a guest for 2 weeks) then click on a link to buy the access directly from Pearson. It save us about $20 from buying from the bookstore.

 

Yeah, we did that with DS's History class.  Book and code were like $180.  Turns out the professor told them the code AND book were "optional."  He ended up not buying either and still did fine.

 

We are waiting to find out about his new English class.  It isn't AS expensive but all professors have to use the book and code written specifically FOR his college......so yeah, they are trying to get more revenue.


Edited by DawnM, 11 August 2017 - 06:27 AM.


#18 jdahlquist

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Posted 11 August 2017 - 11:03 AM

I despise the trend. I hate the entire textbook racket that forces high prices on students for little value. Basically, the college saves manpower in grading by having students buy access to automatic homework grading systems which do a much poorer job than human graders who would be able to assess complex problems.

 

I refuse to use the automatic grading system with my classes, do not require thea ccess code, and recommend that students use one of teh older editions of the text.

What is find frustrating is the universities are saving some manpower, but the total cost to the students is more, with less benefit.  I taught at a state school with mandates to increase graduation rates.  One theory was that students did not complete college because of costs, so a number of policies were put in place to "decrease" cost--larger classes, fewer faculty, fewer TAs. My department which had over 2000 students a year in an introductory, problems-based course went to a required on-iine based problem product because of funding cuts.  So, you have 2000 students X $50 = $100,000 being spent on codes for that one class!   That is more than most professors at the school were making.  


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#19 G5052

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Posted 11 August 2017 - 12:15 PM

I went to buy DD's books this morning after I went to the gym. Three books and three access codes = $600. Sigh.



#20 Sebastian (a lady)

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Posted 11 August 2017 - 12:36 PM

Yeah, we did that with DS's History class.  Book and code were like $180.  Turns out the professor told them the code AND book were "optional."  He ended up not buying either and still did fine.

 

We are waiting to find out about his new English class.  It isn't AS expensive but all professors have to use the book and code written specifically FOR his college......so yeah, they are trying to get more revenue.

 

Special campus editions really frustrate me, especially when they are required for all sections, but then some instructors only use them once or twice.  

 

DS1 had a system specific book for English 100 that was loose leaf on top of being unusable for other schools.  I ended up just giving it to another student this year, hoping that she could avoid having to buy a new one.


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#21 FaithManor

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Posted 11 August 2017 - 12:41 PM

What is find frustrating is the universities are saving some manpower, but the total cost to the students is more, with less benefit.  I taught at a state school with mandates to increase graduation rates.  One theory was that students did not complete college because of costs, so a number of policies were put in place to "decrease" cost--larger classes, fewer faculty, fewer TAs. My department which had over 2000 students a year in an introductory, problems-based course went to a required on-iine based problem product because of funding cuts.  So, you have 2000 students X $50 = $100,000 being spent on codes for that one class!   That is more than most professors at the school were making.  

Exactly. For that price, could we please have another professor or a couple of super great TA's!

 

Some of these decisions are so short sighted.


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#22 Crimson Wife

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Posted 11 August 2017 - 07:13 PM

Special campus editions really frustrate me, especially when they are required for all sections, but then some instructors only use them once or twice. 

 

Yep, one of the bundles DD had to buy this semester was a special campus edition. Looseleaf even :cursing:  She has been warned not to open the package until after the 1st class in case she doesn't actually need it.


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#23 ClemsonDana

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Posted 12 August 2017 - 06:58 AM

Back in the 90s when I went to college, my freshman year I spent more than $600 on books because we 'needed' new editions for everything (biology, chemistry, and calculus) - the paperbacks for lit were cheap. When I taught at a CC, we were given the new editions. Every other year we got a new book, and there was almost no change. I started telling students that I'd keep a copy of the current edition at the front of the classroom and they could check before/after class to see if there was anything that was rearranged or missing because there was very little change between editions. I always write my own assignments and tests, so I never needed/required the code. My syllabus probably said that it was required, though, since the entire department used a common syllabus.

With my high schoolers, I tell them that any edition of the book is fine. Mitosis hasn't changed, so mostly what they need is a reference with good drawings and I don't care what chapter it's in. There are so many excellent animations of complex processes on utube that students can watch, so even access to videos doesn't make it worthwhile to my students. So, I second the advice to wait to use it until you talk to the instructor. I have always told my students not to bother and get a cheap book.
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#24 G5052

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Posted 13 August 2017 - 07:16 AM

The college I work for now is better than the previous one that way. One course I teach has a $40 text, and the other lists the books for $150 new, but you can buy them used or rent on Amazon for less than $50. No course codes.

 

They actually have an approval process for course codes -- it has to be really necessary.


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#25 MarkT

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Posted 13 August 2017 - 09:30 AM

My son's B&M charter uses WebAssign for it's AP math classes.  It is only $10.50 for whole high school year.  Last year the school absorbed that cost but this year the parents have to buck up the money.  That's really cheap so no complaint.

My student likes the instant feedback part but sometimes you have to wrestle with the desired input such as the number of decimal points etc.

 

============================================================================

 

WebAssign seems a little cheaper on the price scale versus some of the access codes out there.

https://www.webassig...ors/purchasing/

 

You can also get a refund if "returned" within 14 days:

http://www.webassign...t/access-codes/

 

There are a few "free" online homework checking programs but not many colleges seem to use them.



#26 jdahlquist

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Posted 13 August 2017 - 11:26 AM

I just looked at WebAssign and it is $22.95 for collegiate use.  That is for basic, "free" content.  To have content tied to the book being used, increases the cost. The content is limited to math and sciences.



#27 KarenNC

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Posted 13 August 2017 - 03:01 PM

Yep, one of the bundles DD had to buy this semester was a special campus edition. Looseleaf even :cursing:  She has been warned not to open the package until after the 1st class in case she doesn't actually need it.

 

We have two of these this semester---Am govt ($154) and stats ($212). By contrast, we can rent used books for Am lit ($30) and world civ ($16). At least the college bookstore pricematched Amazon on the rentals and the stats book (which brought it down to $189). Definitely a racket!



#28 happysmileylady

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Posted 16 August 2017 - 03:29 PM

My oldest just got home for a few days before her classes start.  She told me that only one of her classes has an access code and it's of course the most expensive "book" she has for the semester at $100.

 

The name of the class?  Walking.  Redonkulous


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#29 regentrude

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Posted 16 August 2017 - 03:41 PM

Ouch ouch ouch!

DS is taking biology, chemistry and calculus, and all three require books with access codes  - for three different platforms. This is going to hurt.


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#30 emzhengjiu

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Posted 16 August 2017 - 07:17 PM

I hate access codes as well!  For  couple of my daughter's classes  the access code made sense, but for most it's just crazy.  Thankfully, her biology class this year will use the same text and code for both required semesters.  Her French instructors used the same text and code for a year as well. 



#31 dmmetler

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Posted 16 August 2017 - 08:26 PM

Me too. 2/3 classes have them this fall. I swear half the textbooks in the bookstore come with "MyXLab". Her high school chem also had one.

#32 regentrude

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Posted 23 August 2017 - 05:43 PM

I just spent a crazy $920 on DS' books and stuff and am so irritated. First, they were out of the books for chem and math - even though I called a few days ago, and was assured that yes, they have all the books in store. Then, there are four different online codes for three classes! Math has one, bio has one, and chem has two different ones for homework and lecture/lab. All custom lose leaf three hole punched "books". The lab manual for chemistry cost $150! This is so messed up.

 

 


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#33 FaithManor

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Posted 23 August 2017 - 09:31 PM

Okay my biggest rant about access codes is that ds has a two semester ocean ecology class. Same book. Same lab report book. Access code? Has to be paid EACH semester. $116.00 each time for access to the same content! I am spitting mad. Like spitting cobra mad so administrators better stay away on move in day or they may get an earful.

This college owns a four star bed and breakfast for hosting their VIP's but I think they owe me and every other parent of a student in that class a night at the BnB with chocolate covered strawberries the size of apples and French toast cooked by Bobby Flay!
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#34 teachermom2834

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Posted 24 August 2017 - 06:50 AM

Oh some of these stories are awful. We have now dealt with two cc and two private universities. The absolute worst was the one cc that had their own special editions for each book and access codes paid both semesters for a two semester sequence.

My oldest ds is a business major and he has completely lucked out with inexpensive books. The one expensive book he had this semester he managed to pick up on campus from another student for $25.

I really feel for those of you with STEM books and codes to buy. So many of us budget and plan and finance college creatively and then end up at the mercy of a ridiculous book list published just weeks ahead of the semester.

While most of us here are happy to invest in our kids educations (to whatever extent we are able)it feels really bad to be taken advantage of.
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#35 Susie in CA

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Posted 24 August 2017 - 08:36 AM

Yep. Just went through the same thing. We already own the Math book but the school only lists the bundle of the book (loose leaf) plus access code for $ 160. On Webassign website we could only find a bundle with e-book plus access code for $ 100. Well, we don't need an e-book. Went to college book store to see if we can get the access code only. Yes, but we have to special order it for $71 dollars. Are you for your real? Is what I am thinking in my head. But we need it; so had to order it. 

 

What a racket!


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#36 FaithManor

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Posted 24 August 2017 - 09:10 AM

Yep. Just went through the same thing. We already own the Math book but the school only lists the bundle of the book (loose leaf) plus access code for $ 160. On Webassign website we could only find a bundle with e-book plus access code for $ 100. Well, we don't need an e-book. Went to college book store to see if we can get the access code only. Yes, but we have to special order it for $71 dollars. Are you for your real? Is what I am thinking in my head. But we need it; so had to order it.

What a racket!


I know! It is disgusting.

#37 dmmetler

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Posted 24 August 2017 - 09:12 AM

Last semester was an e-book only class, but the code was good for a year. (I bought the physical book, one edition back, for $5 on Amazon because DD hated the e-book, so basically she just used the code to submit the problem sets). The bookstore manager told DD to make sure she took the 2nd semester in the sequence in either summer or fall because the code/e-book was good for one year, and otherwise she'd have to buy it again.

This semester, a custom, looseleaf textbook and code. The same bookstore manager told DD not to unseal it until she'd gone to class at least a week and had assignments using it on the syllabus, because some sections use it and some don't. Again, I easily found the book, one edition back, dirt cheap on Amazon.

Class 3 actually IS an older edition of a textbook, but one that still is pretty expensive on Amazon (it looks like a lot of Spanish professors are choosing the edition back over the new one). No code, yet, but the front of the book mentions "go to this website and type in the class code your instructor gives you to gain access to the custom digital materials". I'm guessing it also will ask for a credit card number at that point. I bought rather than rent because the same book is listed for the first four semesters of Spanish, and renting would cost more than purchasing. The bookstore manager says usually if they do change a book mid-sequence, they leave it in place for the current students, and change for the freshmen, so as long as DD doesn't skip a semester, she should be able to finish the sequence with that one book.

I can't say I like the textbook selections, but I do definitely like the bookstore manager.
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#38 G5052

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Posted 24 August 2017 - 10:13 AM

I should have known.

 

Bought the book and code shrink-wrapped at the college. The code had the same title as the book. So DD unwrapped it and tried to get it set up just like her professor said.

 

Nope. The bookstore packaged about half of them with the wrong code.

 

They're working on it...



#39 Momto2Ns

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Posted 24 August 2017 - 10:14 AM

Oh some of these stories are awful. We have now dealt with two cc and two private universities. The absolute worst was the one cc that had their own special editions for each book and access codes paid both semesters for a two semester sequence.

 

This is my experience too. The worst was the CC which had tons of special editions - all loose leaf all with codes. The next is the state U which also uses quite a few binder editions and codes and our book bills are typically around $500/semester.

 

The best has been the private U where ds goes. I don't think he's ever paid $200 for books for a semester and is typically under $100. He has never needed a code, not even for math or science classes. When books included codes (math, science, speech... I don't remember what else) the teachers all sent emails before the semester started and said the code was unnecessary and please feel free to buy used. I don't know if this is a university policy, but it seems to be standard practice. The largest class he has ever had was 25 students and the smallest was just five. With such small classes, teachers can actually grade work! While the university's tuition is higher than the state U (not much higher with the scholarship ds has), there are fewer fees and we have almost no add-on expenses (parking is free, laundry is free, bike rentals are free, everything is free). I really appreciate knowing in advance just how much attendance will cost and not being hit with a million extras. 


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#40 G5052

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Posted 24 August 2017 - 10:35 AM

This is my experience too. The worst was the CC which had tons of special editions - all loose leaf all with codes. The next is the state U which also uses quite a few binder editions and codes and our book bills are typically around $500/semester.

 

The best has been the private U where ds goes. I don't think he's ever paid $200 for books for a semester and is typically under $100. He has never needed a code, not even for math or science classes. When books included codes (math, science, speech... I don't remember what else) the teachers all sent emails before the semester started and said the code was unnecessary and please feel free to buy used. I don't know if this is a university policy, but it seems to be standard practice. The largest class he has ever had was 25 students and the smallest was just five. With such small classes, teachers can actually grade work! While the university's tuition is higher than the state U (not much higher with the scholarship ds has), there are fewer fees and we have almost no add-on expenses (parking is free, laundry is free, bike rentals are free, everything is free). I really appreciate knowing in advance just how much attendance will cost and not being hit with a million extras. 

 

Yes, I've heard of private schools who use no or very limited codes. Two brothers that are friends of my two attend a private liberal arts school, and they only allow them for math. My oldest liked it for math because he got immediate feedback on his homework, and it was a must for his accounting class where they were working with different scenarios in business and needed a full set of electronic accounts to work with. He also took online Spanish and found the videos and organized practice very helpful, although they also did live sessions with small groups and one-on-one with the professor.

 

He graduated from the local 2-year in May and starts next week at a nationally-ranked business school as a junior. I was pleased that only ONE of classes required a code, and it's a junior-level accounting class. We did have to pay a $40+ fee per credit "program fee" which includes additional software, speakers, seminars, and field trips, so we'll see what exactly that includes. 



#41 Sebastian (a lady)

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Posted 24 August 2017 - 12:30 PM

Last semester was an e-book only class, but the code was good for a year. (I bought the physical book, one edition back, for $5 on Amazon because DD hated the e-book, so basically she just used the code to submit the problem sets). The bookstore manager told DD to make sure she took the 2nd semester in the sequence in either summer or fall because the code/e-book was good for one year, and otherwise she'd have to buy it again.

This semester, a custom, looseleaf textbook and code. The same bookstore manager told DD not to unseal it until she'd gone to class at least a week and had assignments using it on the syllabus, because some sections use it and some don't. Again, I easily found the book, one edition back, dirt cheap on Amazon.

Class 3 actually IS an older edition of a textbook, but one that still is pretty expensive on Amazon (it looks like a lot of Spanish professors are choosing the edition back over the new one). No code, yet, but the front of the book mentions "go to this website and type in the class code your instructor gives you to gain access to the custom digital materials". I'm guessing it also will ask for a credit card number at that point. I bought rather than rent because the same book is listed for the first four semesters of Spanish, and renting would cost more than purchasing. The bookstore manager says usually if they do change a book mid-sequence, they leave it in place for the current students, and change for the freshmen, so as long as DD doesn't skip a semester, she should be able to finish the sequence with that one book.

I can't say I like the textbook selections, but I do definitely like the bookstore manager.

 

I loved the bookstore staff at the CC my kids were at.  Not only did their website link directly to sites selling used copies of the books, but the staff helped us search through the stack for used copies of texts and even found one used book that still had an access code.  They also had individual access codes available to pair up with used books.

 

I don't know if this was just some really helpful folks in a small college (the bookstore is about the size of the downstairs of my house), or if they are particularly sensitive to prices because many of the students are low income and/or enrolled in vocational programs.

 

By contrast, the university bookstore (same university system, different campus) doesn't let students into the book stacks at all.  You list the courses and they pull the books.  When DS2 took a summer language course there, they didn't have the required audio CDs in stock.  For some reason, those were at the CC bookstore, even though the CC hadn't offered that language in many semesters.  The uni bookstore staff couldn't figure out how to get the CDs from one side of town to the other.  We ended up just driving to the CC and buying them there (after they found them in the back of a file drawer).


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#42 luuknam

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Posted 24 August 2017 - 01:39 PM

This is my experience too. The worst was the CC which had tons of special editions - all loose leaf all with codes. The next is the state U which also uses quite a few binder editions and codes and our book bills are typically around $500/semester.

 

The best has been the private U where ds goes. I don't think he's ever paid $200 for books for a semester and is typically under $100. 

 

 

Wow. When I was in college FT over a decade ago, my book bill was about $500/semester, and I don't even remember ever having to use a code (though I did have Matlab for a class once). Ironically, it's generally the lower division courses (in which the info taught hasn't really changed in years) that cost more... my physics book was $180 USED.  :svengo: (no code... worse yet, I took physics 1 in summer 1 at the CC, and planned to take physics 2 in summer 2, but I got sick and had to drop physics 2... and then in the fall the new edition was out, so the book was instantly practically worthless... I still have it, since selling it for $20 or so just wasn't worth it (I contemplated trying to use it instead of the new edition, but ended up not taking physics 2 in the end at all). On the bright side, DW took physics 1 at the same time I did, so we shared the book. I don't remember if she took physics 2 in summer 2 or not. 



#43 hopskipjump

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Posted 24 August 2017 - 01:46 PM

People have complained about the cost of university texts for decades - and with these stupid codes it's gotten so much worse.

Turns out that dd didn't need the Stats code. So we spent around $300 and could've spent $45. She has a new-to-this-uni instructor and this one doesn't use the code. She is the only math instructor for this class.l not using the code. Even though book/code is what was listed. So we can resale with the code... but it'll still cost more than buying the used $45 book would've!!

Then the $300 anatomy book??? Turns out, the ISBN-class-specific package was only the code and the (consumable) lab book!!!! The freaking text is an e-book!!! So that's $300 thrown to the wind. :( AND I got to spent ANOTHER $50 to rent an older edition of the textbook (to RENT the newer edition was $150 O_O ). DD has comprehension issues with e-reading and really needs a paper book to write and highlight in. *sigh*

This is not a happy semester. :/

#44 Kassia

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Posted 24 August 2017 - 05:24 PM

Not a happy semester here either.  

 

Just paid $420 for my DE student for two classes.  One is an access code, the other the stupid special edition loose-leaf book that I can't buy anywhere else.  

 

And...full-time faculty might strike starting Saturday (the first day of the semester).  Both of dd's professors are full-time faculty and are supposed to be excellent.  I don't want her being taught by a last minute sub.  

 

I'm going to cry.  Or eat a lot of chocolate.  Or both.



#45 jdahlquist

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Posted 24 August 2017 - 05:28 PM

I just went with DS to the bookstore to get books.  It is frustrating when I can't figure out what book he needs when the course he is taking is a course I have taught before!  The bookstore has arranged all of the books by the author's last name and has not marked them as to what course they are associated with.  So, my son needs Smith's economics book--we go over to the shelf and there are these books by Smith: Principles of Economics; Principles of Macroeconomics, Essentials of Economics, Essentials of Macroeconomics; each of those had several variations: with code, without code, new, used, three-ring punched.  None of them were exactly what the prof had on her syllabus.  

 

I went back to my office and looked at the faculty section of the publisher's website to try to find out what the professor meant by what she had on her syllabus and I got even more confused!  It appears that the professor has indicated a special edition with a 6 month rental, thinking it will be the cheapest option for the students, but the bookstore says this special edition is on backorder.  I appreciate that she is trying to save the students money, but I think it is adding to some confusion (and may be costing students more in the long run).  I just tried to look at the table of contents from the instructor site and it took about three minutes to load; it is in some proprietary format; I can't imagine what problems the students will have.     



#46 nansk

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Posted 24 August 2017 - 07:01 PM

.. I got to spent ANOTHER $50 to rent an older edition of the textbook ... DD has comprehension issues with e-reading and really needs a paper book to write and highlight in...

You probably meant "buy" there because she cannot write and highlight in a rented book, can she?

 

When I wanted to annotate a book but not write in it, I stuck little Post-its on each page.


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#47 daijobu

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Posted 24 August 2017 - 07:44 PM

Can someone explain what these "access codes" are for?  



#48 regentrude

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Posted 24 August 2017 - 08:06 PM

Can someone explain what these "access codes" are for?  

 

Automated homework systems. Students submit homework answers online, computer grades. Problems are typically using different numbers for different students.
They can also be used for quizzes.

 

I hate them with a passion. A human grader who can evaluate a complex problem in its entirety is much more beneficial than a machine that does not recognize a correct answer if it is given in a slightly different format.


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#49 hopskipjump

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Posted 24 August 2017 - 08:32 PM

You probably meant "buy" there because she cannot write and highlight in a rented book, can she?

When I wanted to annotate a book but not write in it, I stuck little Post-its on each page.


Ah, yes - she's renting but using Post-Its for notes and using little bookmark post-its and transparent Post-Its for mini-highlighting. Can't do that in an book! lol (I know some you can "highlight" and take notes but if dd physically writing the words... she doesn't remember a bit of the information! lol

#50 daijobu

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Posted 24 August 2017 - 08:54 PM

Automated homework systems. Students submit homework answers online, computer grades. Problems are typically using different numbers for different students.
They can also be used for quizzes.

 

I hate them with a passion. A human grader who can evaluate a complex problem in its entirety is much more beneficial than a machine that does not recognize a correct answer if it is given in a slightly different format.

 

Isn't that was grad students are for?  DH was a TA, and the most time-consuming part of his job was making copies of handouts.  The prof took to calling him (in his most high-pitch snooty voice) "Oh Copy Boy!"  

 

OT:

I remember having to retrieve my graded problem sets; sometimes they were dumped in a pile in the hall, all of them the same green engineering paper.  Soon we took to using highlighters and markers and outline the edges of the paper so they could be more easily identified.