Jump to content


What's with the ads?

Photo
* * * * * 1 votes

Book a Week 2017 - BW29: First Hugo Award - Alfred Bester for Demolished Man


149 replies to this topic

What's with the ads?

#101 Lady Florida.

Lady Florida.

    New again (old) avatar. Same old me.

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 12718 posts

Posted 21 July 2017 - 04:29 PM

My War and Peace musing for today - 

 

I was thinking about the characters and how Tolstoy doesn't judge them, just shows them to us. They're all complicated and neither wholly good nor wholly bad, just wholly human. We start for example, to dislike Dolokhov then we see the loving son and brother we don't expect to see in him. Even Napoleon gets his chance to show he's not such a bad guy. ;) However, he never seems to show Anna Pavlovna as anything other than a shallow celebrity groupie. I wonder if she was meant as a stand-in for shallow people in general or if he just wanted one selfish, uncomplicated character in his novel. :)


Edited by Lady Florida., 21 July 2017 - 04:32 PM.

  • Jane in NC, Ali in OR, Kareni and 12 others like this

#102 Kareni

Kareni

    BEEn here awhile

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 16081 posts

Posted 21 July 2017 - 05:05 PM

Some book-ish posts ~

 

Here's a review of a book that might interest some here:

 

REVIEW: Illuminating Women in the Medieval World by Christine Sciacca by Jayne from the Dear Author site

 

"Romance books used to be full of medieval stories. I cut my teeth on the famous – or infamous depending on your POV – “The Wolf and the Dove” by Kathleen Woodiwiss. When I saw this beautiful cover, I immediately clicked to discover more of what this book is about. In addition to seeing what medieval women looked like, the illustrations also show what they routinely did and how they lived. The books and manuscripts from which the figures are taken give definitive clues as to their influence on not only women but also men of the day. The fact that some were not only commissioned by women but also made by women and owned by women – no mean feat when books were extraordinarily expensive – give more evidence of the financial and influential positions some women managed to achieve.

 

Since the Church was so important in medieval life, it’s not surprising that most of the illustrations are taken from European Christian devotional books but I was delighted that there is one image from the Ethiopian Orthodox Church and several from Haggadahs, a Siddur and a Torah. In addition there is an illustration from a famous twelfth century story by Nizami about the romance between Iranian king Khusrau and Armenian princess Shirin...."

**

 

From Tor.com:

 

The Best Vacation Spots in Science Fiction & Fantasy  by Stubby the Rocket

 

"We’re halfway through summer, which means it’s time to pack our bags and finally decide how we’re going to spend our precious vacation days! Ancient ruins and cruise ships are all well and good, but they’re so… real. So we took a slightly different approach and looked to our favorite science fiction and fantasy books for getaway inspirations. And while we’re of course interested in elf-houses and vast island chains and the distant corners of the universe, it turns out some of us just want to go to London. Just maybe not the London we’re used to…

 

Probably would just be better to show you, right? Here are Tor.com’s top SFF vacation destinations!..."

 

AND

 

Five SFF Books Written Collaboratively  by Andrew Neil Gray and J.S. Herbison

 

AND

 

Five Books That Resemble Science Fiction  by Karen Heuler

**

 

And some currently free books for Kindle readers ~

 

 
The Many Lives of Fitzwilliam Darcy  by Beau North and Brooke West

 

Beauty and the Mustache: A Philosophical Romance (Winston Brothers Book 1)  by Penny Reid

 

Bookish  by Olivia Hawthorne

 

Regards,

Kareni


  • Jane in NC, Stacia, aggieamy and 4 others like this

#103 Matryoshka

Matryoshka

    Apprentice Bee Keeper

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 11055 posts

Posted 21 July 2017 - 05:25 PM

So, I've just been haphazardly filling in Big Bingo squares thus far... When I first got the list I was able to retroactively match up almost all of the books I'd read previously in the year to a category.  Then I looked through my TR list and filled in some other squares with things I though might fit so I've got an idea what might work for those.  Other books I've read I've realized after I've already read them that they'd fit somewhere, (like I read The Round House just because I wanted to read something by Erdich and it was on Overdrive - didn't even know what the whole plot was - and realized after I'd read it that it would be good for the "Wrath" square, and I read Ruby in the Smoke for July birthstone, and then realized it would work for "Female Villain") - but I haven't really been trying to fill rows or looking for books not on my TR list to fill a particular category.

 

But I've realized I'm nonetheless getting close to filling in some rows, so I thought I should start picking some books for some of the categories that would complete them, and I'd thought I'd ask here for some recommendations. :D

 

I've completed everything in the first row except "Random book from the 240 shelf in your library:"  There are NO books in the 240 category in my library.  Not one.  I looked.  The topic seems to be something religious, so I looked up all the religiously themed books on my TR list to see if any of them would work, but nope.  225, 232, and 297.  No 240. :(  I thought I might try to go the other direction and tried searching for 240 in my library's electronic catalog (for the whole consortium), but apparently even in advanced search I can't search by Dewey Decimal number. :(  So does anyone have any idea what the heck is the actual topic of 240?  How about 241-249??  HELP!

 

That one's the toughie.  Here are some easier categories I'd love suggestions for:

 

- Mars - this one should be easy for me, since I love SciFi.  I just read The Martian last year, so that's out.  Radiance would work, but it's already happily filling another category.  Any other good ideas?

 

- Author who uses a pen name - not up for Middlemarch atm.  Just re-read Silas Marner a few years ago.  Who should I be looking at other than George Eliot? ;)  No serial romance writers, please (don't many of those use pen names?)

 

- Has pretty pictures - any suggestions?

 

- Set in the 1970's 

 

- Philately

 

- Set in PA (this is for 'state you were born in')

 

- Made into a Musical - has anyone else noticed that this is in Big Bingo twice?  I've already read The Wizard of Oz and Wicked.  What else is there?

 

- Kurt Vonnegut - I've already read Cat's Cradle and Slaughterhouse Five and a couple of others I don't remember and loved them.  What should I read next?

 

- Neil Gaiman - Read American Gods and was disappointed.  What should I read instead?

 

 

 

 


  • Jane in NC, Kareni, Stacia and 4 others like this

#104 Stacia

Stacia

    In the League of Casually Promiscuous and Whimsical Readers

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 14501 posts

Posted 21 July 2017 - 06:20 PM

Matryoshka, some ideas...

 

Mars: Packing for Mars by Mary Roach. Something with Roman mythology with Mars in it?

 

Pen Name: here's a list of authors with their various pen names.

 

Pretty Pictures: I've seen this one at my library & love the pictures: National Parks of America. Maybe something like that? Or an art book? Monet's House is lovely.

 

Made into a Musical being on there twice was my mistake. I didn't mean to put it there twice. Cats was a musical (based off of T.S. Eliot's Old Possum's Book of Practical Cats), Phantom of the Opera, etc.... What were all those that Andrew Lloyd Weber made into musical versions?

 

Vonnegut -- pick something & read it. How about Timequake? Deadeye Dick?

 

Neil Gaiman -- did you read The Graveyard Book? I also love Good Omens (which he wrote with Terry Pratchett).

 

Re: my own reading. I finally started Ready Player one yesterday. I actually had a hard time slogging through about the first 75-100 pages. I almost gave up but kept sticking it out because my ds really wants me to read it, plus I've heard great reviews from friends. Finally, around page 100, the story/action kicked in, so it's a bit better now. Hoping I'll like it better from this point forward. (Ds seems to think I will.)


  • Jane in NC, Kareni, JennW in SoCal and 9 others like this

#105 Maus

Maus

    Hive Mind Queen Bee

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 1297 posts

Posted 21 July 2017 - 07:21 PM

This is cool! My DH is not much of a reader, but he has been learning guitar very diligently for the past few years. (He did play a little in college, but didn't touch it for decades.)

I am reading a "learning" book right now, too, "A Mind for Numbers" by Barbara Oakley. The author described herself as a language/literature person for her youth and college years, but came somewhat late to the table of the STEM world. Ended up earning a doctorate in electrical engineering and is a professor of engineering. That is my kid of story! So far, there is never any hint anywhere in the book that learning if for the young or you have to go with your aptitude or any of those other limitations we dupe ourselves into believing sometimes. It's very inspiring!

My local library has that!  

 

Gary Marcus talks about learning somewhat differently as an older learner.  He noticed the young students in his class learned fingerings more easily, but he learned dynamics more easily, for instance.  He has context to build from as he learns.


  • Jane in NC, Kareni, Stacia and 6 others like this

#106 Matryoshka

Matryoshka

    Apprentice Bee Keeper

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 11055 posts

Posted 21 July 2017 - 08:23 PM

Matryoshka, some ideas...

 

Mars: Packing for Mars by Mary Roach. Something with Roman mythology with Mars in it?

 

Hmmm on the Mary Roach book.  I've got a couple of other of her books lying around the house (Stiff and Gulp), but I haven't read them (they're dd's).  But I hear she's great.  That title reminded me of another book that I almost added to my TR list, I think about a bunch of wannabe astronauts living in a self-contained dome in preparation for a trip to space (was it Mars??).  I didn't add it because a bunch of reviews said all the characters were jerks.  But if anyone remembers what it was, and it was Mars, maybe I'll rethink?

 

Pen Name: here's a list of authors with their various pen names.

 

 

Ooo, thank you, that is a super-helpful list!  I found a bunch of potential names, bu then hit gold when I found one that was already on my TR list (Sjón)

 

 

Pretty Pictures: I've seen this one at my library & love the pictures: National Parks of America. Maybe something like that? Or an art book? Monet's House is lovely.

 

I'll go look at the pretty pictures books. :)  I think part of my sticking point with picture books is that I tend to look at them and read bits here and there, but not really read them in their entirety (the same with cookbooks).  I have a hard time imagining actually reading all the text in either of those categories... the thought kinda overwhelms me...

 

Made into a Musical being on there twice was my mistake. I didn't mean to put it there twice. Cats was a musical (based off of T.S. Eliot's Old Possum's Book of Practical Cats), Phantom of the Opera, etc.... What were all those that Andrew Lloyd Weber made into musical versions?

 

I just can't get excited about any of the ALW books.  Phantom as a book gets 'eh' reviews, and I'm just not up to tackling Les Miz right now (or quirky cat poetry).  But you made me do more thorough googling, and guess what?  Menschen im Hotel / Grand Hotel was made into a musical!  I knew there was a film, but I had no idea there was a musical!  Get outta town!  So, that's now being switched to that category. "Set in Europe" is like half the books I read, so I'll just pick something else for that...

 

If I ever get around to the second Musical book, I think I'll read Mary Poppins.... :D

 

 

Vonnegut -- pick something & read it. How about Timequake? Deadeye Dick?

 

What's your favorite? :bigear:

 

 

Neil Gaiman -- did you read The Graveyard Book? I also love Good Omens (which he wrote with Terry Pratchett).

 

I've only read American Gods.  But so many people raved about that book that now I'm wary.  If the next one is as disappointing, I'm probably done with him.  I think I saw Rose or someone read Stardust and really liked it recently?  Anyone else think American Gods was totally underwhelming but really likes something else by Gaiman?  (If you want to know my particular issues with AG, the Goodreads review by David Katzman - it's only a few down from the top - is pretty much spot-on imho).

 

 

So, apparently Dewey Decimal 240 is Christian moral and devotional theology.  No wonder there's nothing in my library up here in secular heathen land. :tongue_smilie:  I have no idea where even to start with that.  Anyone have a book that would work for a super-duper liberal Christian?  Think UCC, but I've also read some good stuff by Episcopalians.  The books in my TR list are apparently filed under "Jesus and His Family" (232) and "New Testament" (225).


Edited by Matryoshka, 21 July 2017 - 08:26 PM.

  • Jane in NC, Kareni, Stacia and 5 others like this

#107 Stacia

Stacia

    In the League of Casually Promiscuous and Whimsical Readers

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 14501 posts

Posted 21 July 2017 - 08:39 PM

I'll go look at the pretty pictures books. :)  I think part of my sticking point with picture books is that I tend to look at them and read bits here and there, but not really read them in their entirety (the same with cookbooks).  I have a hard time imagining actually reading all the text in either of those categories... the thought kinda overwhelms me...

 

<snip>

 

What's your favorite? :bigear:

 

 

 

I've only read American Gods.  But so many people raved about that book that now I'm wary.  If the next one is as disappointing, I'm probably done with him.  I think I saw Rose or someone read Stardust and really liked it recently?  Anyone else think American Gods was totally underwhelming but really likes something else by Gaiman?  (If you want to know my particular issues with AG, the Goodreads review by David Katzman - it's only a few down from the top - is pretty much spot-on imho).

 

 

So, apparently Dewey Decimal 240 is Christian moral and devotional theology.  No wonder there's nothing in my library up here in secular heathen land. :tongue_smilie:  I have no idea where even to start with that.  Anyone have a book that would work for a super-duper liberal Christian?  Think UCC, but I've also read some good stuff by Episcopalians.  The books in my TR list are apparently filed under "Jesus and His Family" (232) and "New Testament" (225).

 

The Monet's House book was readable. It had info about his life, how/when he acquired the house, & how it was adapted & such over the years. Lots of photos, some text, all interesting.

 

Re: Vonnegut. My favorite is Slaughterhouse-Five. I remember enjoying both Timequake & Deadeye Dick when I read them but it has been years & years. I remember not really liking The Sirens of Titan or Galapagos.

 

I haven't read a lot of Gaiman. I love Good Omens, but to be fair, it's probably because he collaborated w/ Terry Pratchett (& I love Terry Pratchett's writing more than I love Neil Gaiman's writing). I think the book is fun & brilliant & the beauty of it is that they brought out the best in each other's writing style with that book. I very much liked The Graveyard Book (I think I even called it charming which seems weird for a title that has graveyard in it), though I thought the first chapter was a bit scary/creepy since it's really a book aimed for kids/the younger side of the YA market. Still, a good one. I read The Truth is a Cave in the Black Mountains, which is really a picture book I suppose; I felt 'meh' about it. And I read Fortunately the Milk which was a fun, silly kids book. I haven't read his other stuff.

 

Re: the 240 section -- that came about because there were 240 squares on that bingo card. But, go wild. Go off-course. What is your favorite three-digit number? Pick that & use it instead. Or randomly pick a number on the Dewey Decimal list & go with it. Or scramble the 240 & select a book from 420 instead.  It's a bingo list for fun only. There aren't really any rules for the 240 Bingo... &, even if there were, weren't rules made to be broken anyway? ;)
 


  • Jane in NC, Kareni, Mom-ninja. and 7 others like this

#108 Eliana

Eliana

    Hive Mind Queen Bee

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 3083 posts

Posted 21 July 2017 - 08:51 PM


 

- Mars - this one should be easy for me, since I love SciFi.  I just read The Martian last year, so that's out.  Radiance would work, but it's already happily filling another category.  Any other good ideas?

 

- Author who uses a pen name - not up for Middlemarch atm.  Just re-read Silas Marner a few years ago.  Who should I be looking at other than George Eliot? ;)  No serial romance writers, please (don't many of those use pen names?)

 

- Has pretty pictures - any suggestions?

 

- Set in the 1970's 

 

- Philately

 

- Set in PA (this is for 'state you were born in')

 

- Made into a Musical - has anyone else noticed that this is in Big Bingo twice?  I've already read The Wizard of Oz and Wicked.  What else is there?

 

- Kurt Vonnegut - I've already read Cat's Cradle and Slaughterhouse Five and a couple of others I don't remember and loved them.  What should I read next?

 

- Neil Gaiman - Read American Gods and was disappointed.  What should I read instead?

 

Mars:

Kim Stanley Robinson's Red Mars is on my TBR shelf and I've heard many folks rave about it.

CL Moore's short story Shambleau is set on Mars. You can read it in The Best of CL Moore (which has a nice selection of her work, including my favorite of her stories "No Woman Born"
 

SF classics I read long ago:
Clarke's Sands of Mars

2 Heinlein juveniles  Podkayne of Mars and  Red Planet

An Asimov juvenile David Starr Space Ranger

Bradbury's Martian Chronicles

 

A juvenile/YA I read and reread as a young person and still reread fondly (though with a clearer eye for its flaws - do make sure you read the more recent edition): Journey Between Worlds

 

A juvenile I preread for my kids lately that is not one I will be returning to again, but had a sweetness under its absurdities that I found appealing.

Mars Evacuees

 

Books on my TBR shelf, but lower priority than the Robinson:

 

Empress of Mars

Genesis: An Epic Poem of Terraforming Mars

Desolation Road

 

Author who uses a pen name:

 

Marie Brennan Midnight Never Come

Pablo Neruda - I particularly love his Hands of the Day poetry collection

Gabriela Mistral - Collected Poems

Anne Bronte - Tenant of Wildfell Hall (a Bronte novel for those of us who are Team Austen)

Goblin Emperor

George Sand - Marianne

Sjon - The Whispering Muse

Josephine Tey - The Expensive Halo (or one of her mysteries: Brat Farrar was my favorite)

Moliere - Tartuffe

bell hooks From Margin to Center

Elizabeth Peters,James Tiptree Jr, Isak Dinesin, Saki, CS Forester, Nevil Shute, George Orwell, O. Henry

 

Has Pretty Pictures:

 

Beneath Cold Seas

The Bluebird Effect

Let Your Motto be Resistance

Interwoven Globe

Moonbird

 

Set in the 1970's

 

All the President's Men

Shah of Shah's

Mistry's A Fine Balance is set in the '70's, I believe.

Diana Wynne Jones's YA Dogsbody is a fantasy novel, but set in a very real English 1970's with background of the Troubles

Fitzgerald's The Bookshop

 

Set in PA

 

August Wilson - Fences (or any of the plays in his Pittsburgh cycle)

Song of Solomon

On the Run

Silver Like Dust

In Her Shoes

Breathing Lessons

Philadelphia Story

 

Made into a Musical

 

Oliver Twist

Show Boat

Phantom of the Opera

Les Miserables

Porgy

Old Possum's Book of Practical Cats

Berlin Stories

Tales of the South Pacific

Pygmalion

Romeo and Juliet

 

Vonnegut:

Player Piano - this is my favorite of his books (though my taste on this is weird)

 

ETA: there have been lots of posts since I started this reply, so much of what I've shared will probably not be useful since you've found so many solutions... but I'll leave this here in case you want more ideas.


Edited by Eliana, 21 July 2017 - 09:22 PM.

  • Jane in NC, Ali in OR, Kareni and 12 others like this

#109 Jane in NC

Jane in NC

    Archipelagic

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 12109 posts

Posted 21 July 2017 - 09:11 PM

Dearest Eliana,

Welcome back! We have missed you!

Hugs,
Jane
  • Kareni, JennW in SoCal, Stacia and 8 others like this

#110 Butter

Butter

    Hive Mind Level 6 Worker: Scout Bee

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 5911 posts

Posted 21 July 2017 - 09:19 PM

Today I read Augustine Came to Kent by Barbara Willard.  I was pre-reading it for Fritz for next school year.  It was much better than I expected.  It was actually a really sweet story set when Augustine was sent to England by Pope Gregory I and converted several people including King Ethelbert.


  • Jane in NC, Kareni, Stacia and 5 others like this

#111 Eliana

Eliana

    Hive Mind Queen Bee

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 3083 posts

Posted 21 July 2017 - 09:21 PM

Dearest Eliana,

Welcome back! We have missed you!

Hugs,
Jane

 

:grouphug:

 

I have missed you all!  ...and even more so after the joy of meeting Stacia in person.

 

I'm still not reading as much (or as well) as I did pre-concussion, writing is still harder than it used to be, and I'm not sure I can be as self-censoring as this space requires... but I am feeling brave enough to try!


  • Jane in NC, Ali in OR, Kareni and 12 others like this

#112 Kareni

Kareni

    BEEn here awhile

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 16081 posts

Posted 21 July 2017 - 09:35 PM

 That title reminded me of another book that I almost added to my TR list, I think about a bunch of wannabe astronauts living in a self-contained dome in preparation for a trip to space (was it Mars??).  I didn't add it because a bunch of reviews said all the characters were jerks.  But if anyone remembers what it was, and it was Mars, maybe I'll rethink?

 

I believe you may be thinking of The Wanderers by Meg Howrey. 

 

An Amazon Best Book of March 2017: "The premise is simple: three astronauts – one American, one Russian, one Japanese – participate in a simulation of the first-ever mission to Mars before embarking on the real thing. They are selected as a trio based on complementary skills and personalities: unflappable, endlessly capable Helen is the oldest at 53, a widow with a brilliant but slightly off-kilter daughter; Sergei is the charismatic, hot-headed jokester of the crew (by astronaut standards) with two sons and a recent divorce; Yoshihiro is observant and good-natured, providing balance where needed. We learn about the astronauts' families as much as them as the book is told from alternating characters’ perspectives – including that of a team psychologist. The story stretches beyond the claustrophobic simulation to depict a Russian teenager exploring his emerging sexuality, a young virtual reality actress performing with equal parts ambition and angst, and a fiercely independent businesswoman struggling with the unspoken compromises of marriage. As the plot unfolds, the simulation, set in the Utah desert, becomes increasingly real, with each astronaut warping differently under the stress, loyalties straining to not fray. It’s addictive watching such highly disciplined characters discover what they can reveal to themselves and each other in months' long close quarters. Best of all, the author follows through on the questions raised: each astronaut writes letters to an important family member that are plaintive but plainspoken in what they reveal about what it means to be a mother, a husband, and a lover. For those lured by the Station Eleven comparison: that book’s a Vin Diesel movie compared to this one. This rewarding voyage within is more along the lines of The Martian, as conceived and written by Anne Patchett. —Katy Ball, The Amazon Book Review

 

 

 

...

 

It's so nice to see you again, Eliana!

 

Regards,

Kareni


  • Jane in NC, Stacia, Matryoshka and 7 others like this

#113 Chrysalis Academy

Chrysalis Academy

    Amateur Bee Keeper

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 10063 posts

Posted 21 July 2017 - 09:36 PM

Eliana!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

 

:party:

 

 

I'm so happy to see you back! You've been missed. I find myself frequently musing about books you've suggested - just last week, I think, we were talking about Jo Walton, who you introduced me to. Anyway, it's lovely to see your smiling face!


  • Jane in NC, Kareni, Stacia and 6 others like this

#114 Kareni

Kareni

    BEEn here awhile

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 16081 posts

Posted 21 July 2017 - 09:45 PM

I finished my re-read of the Lyn Gala series that I've so enjoyed and learned of a free prelude to the series.  It's available from the publisher's website but does require that you register.  The prelude is categorized as Science Fiction & Space Opera, and LGBTTQ.

 

Prelude to Claimings, Tails, and Other Alien Artifacts  by Lyn Gala

 

"Before Liam had a new commander who openly distrusted him, before Ondry earned his ka status, there were two traders. Yet Ondry wants to earn status, and he is curious about this new human. Liam has just arrived on the planet and he’s trying to figure out these aliens who supposedly have good metals to trade. Neither of them suspects that a chance trade and a few pots knocked off a table could lead their lives and their fates to intertwine."

 

Regards,

Kareni


  • Jane in NC, Stacia, aggieamy and 6 others like this

#115 Chrysalis Academy

Chrysalis Academy

    Amateur Bee Keeper

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 10063 posts

Posted 21 July 2017 - 09:50 PM

So, I've just been haphazardly filling in Big Bingo squares thus far... When I first got the list I was able to retroactively match up almost all of the books I'd read previously in the year to a category.  Then I looked through my TR list and filled in some other squares with things I though might fit so I've got an idea what might work for those.  Other books I've read I've realized after I've already read them that they'd fit somewhere, (like I read The Round House just because I wanted to read something by Erdich and it was on Overdrive - didn't even know what the whole plot was - and realized after I'd read it that it would be good for the "Wrath" square, and I read Ruby in the Smoke for July birthstone, and then realized it would work for "Female Villain") - but I haven't really been trying to fill rows or looking for books not on my TR list to fill a particular category.

 

But I've realized I'm nonetheless getting close to filling in some rows, so I thought I should start picking some books for some of the categories that would complete them, and I'd thought I'd ask here for some recommendations. :D

 

I've completed everything in the first row except "Random book from the 240 shelf in your library:"  There are NO books in the 240 category in my library.  Not one.  I looked.  The topic seems to be something religious, so I looked up all the religiously themed books on my TR list to see if any of them would work, but nope.  225, 232, and 297.  No 240. :(  I thought I might try to go the other direction and tried searching for 240 in my library's electronic catalog (for the whole consortium), but apparently even in advanced search I can't search by Dewey Decimal number. :(  So does anyone have any idea what the heck is the actual topic of 240?  How about 241-249??  HELP!

 

That one's the toughie.  Here are some easier categories I'd love suggestions for:

 

- Mars - this one should be easy for me, since I love SciFi.  I just read The Martian last year, so that's out.  Radiance would work, but it's already happily filling another category.  Any other good ideas?

 

- Author who uses a pen name - not up for Middlemarch atm.  Just re-read Silas Marner a few years ago.  Who should I be looking at other than George Eliot? ;)  No serial romance writers, please (don't many of those use pen names?)

 

- Has pretty pictures - any suggestions?

 

- Set in the 1970's 

 

- Philately

 

- Set in PA (this is for 'state you were born in')

 

- Made into a Musical - has anyone else noticed that this is in Big Bingo twice?  I've already read The Wizard of Oz and Wicked.  What else is there?

 

- Kurt Vonnegut - I've already read Cat's Cradle and Slaughterhouse Five and a couple of others I don't remember and loved them.  What should I read next?

 

- Neil Gaiman - Read American Gods and was disappointed.  What should I read instead?

 

Yeah, I found the 240 thing challenging. I ended up reading Help Thanks Wow by Anne Lamott, which was good. Any of her more devotional-type books would fit into that category, i think.

 

Mars - I have Daughter of Mars and The Wanderers as options but have read neither yet.

 

Pen Name - I read a Jean Plaidy book, for nostalgia's sake - I grew up reading her work as Victoria Holt/Jean Plaidy. With my mom.  The Jean Plaidy books are mostly historical fiction.

 

Philately - Going Postal by Terry Pratchett!! What else?

 

Set in PA - Heat & Light

 

Made into a Musical - An American Tragedy or The Color Purple or Look Homeward Angel would also work

 

Kurt Vonnegut - Slaughterhouse-Five and Galapagos were my favorites. I didn't like Sirens of Titan or Breakfast of Champions, and I didn't even finish Cat's Cradle

 

Neil Gaiman - I'm with you, American Gods has been my least favorite Neil Gaiman so far. And I abandoned Neverwhere. Norse Gods was fine, but not stellar. But I loved Stardust, The Graveyard Book, and The Ocean at the End of the Lane.  Especially the latter.  Lovely book, I cried.  I highly recommend listening to an audio read by the author, that's what I did with Stardust and I'm sure I liked it more because of NG's reading.

 

Oh and I absolutely adore Good Omens. Such a funny book. I might have to re-read that for my Laugh Out Loud square, nothing else has made me crack a chuckle so far.


Edited by Chrysalis Academy, 21 July 2017 - 09:51 PM.

  • Jane in NC, Kareni, Stacia and 7 others like this

#116 Chrysalis Academy

Chrysalis Academy

    Amateur Bee Keeper

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 10063 posts

Posted 21 July 2017 - 10:00 PM

Another book suggestion for Big Bingo, The River of Doubt: Theodore Roosevelt's Darkest Journey. This could work for A Roosevelt, Rainforest, or Set in South America.  It started out a little slow, but man, it's gotten harrowing! Lots of great nature writing intermixed with heart-in-throat adventures. I'm really enjoying it.


  • Jane in NC, Kareni, Stacia and 9 others like this

#117 Matryoshka

Matryoshka

    Apprentice Bee Keeper

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 11055 posts

Posted 21 July 2017 - 10:19 PM

Another book suggestion for Big Bingo, The River of Doubt: Theodore Roosevelt's Darkest Journey. This could work for A Roosevelt, Rainforest, or Set in South America.  It started out a little slow, but man, it's gotten harrowing! Lots of great nature writing intermixed with heart-in-throat adventures. I'm really enjoying it.

 

I have this on my physical bookshelf, and had just been considering it for Travel Gone Wrong, lol!  Do you think it would work for that too?

 

Of course, I also don't have a book for the Roosevelt square, so don't know why I thought of the other one first... :tongue_smilie:  Glad to hear you're enjoying it so much!


Edited by Matryoshka, 21 July 2017 - 10:21 PM.

  • Jane in NC, Kareni, Stacia and 7 others like this

#118 Chrysalis Academy

Chrysalis Academy

    Amateur Bee Keeper

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 10063 posts

Posted 21 July 2017 - 10:25 PM

I have this on my physical bookshelf, and had just been considering it for Travel Gone Wrong, lol!  Do you think it would work for that too?

 

Of course, I also don't have a book for the Roosevelt square, so don't know why I thought of the other one first... :tongue_smilie:  Glad to hear you're enjoying it so much!

 

Oh yes, absolutely. Very, very wrong.


  • Jane in NC, Kareni, Stacia and 7 others like this

#119 Stacia

Stacia

    In the League of Casually Promiscuous and Whimsical Readers

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 14501 posts

Posted 21 July 2017 - 10:53 PM

Eliana!!!

(I'm doing a happy dance!)
  • Jane in NC, Kareni, aggieamy and 6 others like this

#120 Lady Florida.

Lady Florida.

    New again (old) avatar. Same old me.

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 12718 posts

Posted 21 July 2017 - 10:58 PM

 

 

- Author who uses a pen name - not up for Middlemarch atm.  Just re-read Silas Marner a few years ago.  Who should I be looking at other than George Eliot? ;)  No serial romance writers, please (don't many of those use pen names?)

 

 

- Made into a Musical - has anyone else noticed that this is in Big Bingo twice?  I've already read The Wizard of Oz and Wicked.  What else is there?

 

 

Pen name - Do you like detective stories, especially the old fashioned hard boiled detective? There's the Cormoran Strike novels written by Robert Galbraith who is actually JK Rowling.

 

Musical - Something Arthurian (Camelot)

 

 

Re: my own reading. I finally started Ready Player one yesterday. I actually had a hard time slogging through about the first 75-100 pages. I almost gave up but kept sticking it out because my ds really wants me to read it, plus I've heard great reviews from friends. Finally, around page 100, the story/action kicked in, so it's a bit better now. Hoping I'll like it better from this point forward. (Ds seems to think I will.)

 

I'm not sure if I would have enjoyed reading it but I found the audio book to be fun. Wil Wheaton narrates it and he was the perfect choice for a narrator. If you can't get through the print version maybe give the audio book a try.

 

 

I've only read American Gods.  But so many people raved about that book that now I'm wary.  If the next one is as disappointing, I'm probably done with him.  I think I saw Rose or someone read Stardust and really liked it recently?  Anyone else think American Gods was totally underwhelming but really likes something else by Gaiman?  (If you want to know my particular issues with AG, the Goodreads review by David Katzman - it's only a few down from the top - is pretty much spot-on imho).

 

 

 

 

I meant to leave the Neil Gaiman quote in your other post but forgot. I don't care for him (or Terry Pratchett) but I loved Good Omens. I found myself laughing out loud often. 


  • Jane in NC, Kareni, Stacia and 9 others like this

#121 Lady Florida.

Lady Florida.

    New again (old) avatar. Same old me.

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 12718 posts

Posted 21 July 2017 - 11:03 PM

Eliana! It's so good to see you. I hope you'll keep hanging around here even if you aren't reading much. I always enjoyed your posts. 


  • Jane in NC, Kareni, Stacia and 7 others like this

#122 Lady Florida.

Lady Florida.

    New again (old) avatar. Same old me.

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 12718 posts

Posted 21 July 2017 - 11:05 PM

Ooh, I did a quick check of my library holds before heading to bed and Snow Crash is here. I'm looking forward to starting it as my bedtime reading in a few minutes. :)


  • Jane in NC, Stacia, aggieamy and 6 others like this

#123 mumto2

mumto2

    Hive Mind Empress Bee

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 6117 posts

Posted 22 July 2017 - 02:49 AM

Eliana, So glad to see you back!!! You have been missed greatly and thought of frequently!
  • Jane in NC, Kareni, Stacia and 6 others like this

#124 bookbard

bookbard

    Hive Mind Level 5 Worker: Forager Bee

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 338 posts

Posted 22 July 2017 - 05:01 AM

I've just finished reading the Vorkosigan series by Lois McMaster Bujold. I actually had a few false starts with this series, because it was written out of chronological order - it's best to begin a few books in with A Warrior's Apprentice. I've enjoyed her Chalion series and her Penric novellas too. I really love finding a new author with a lot of books behind her; reduces so much of the work of finding something new to read. 

 

My sisters have been asking for recommendations. I have been reading mostly fantasy over the last year so I haven't been much help. They enjoyed The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society. Any recommendations of good reads of that type? I'm thinking of suggesting Ann Patchett's Run


  • Jane in NC, Kareni, Stacia and 7 others like this

#125 Violet Crown

Violet Crown

    Onward Thru the Fog

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 4178 posts

Posted 22 July 2017 - 06:22 AM

It's very good to see you back, Eliana. I look forward to your voice in the discussions again.

Matryoshka - For Pretty Pictures, you can't go wrong with William Blake's poetry. For 240s, have you read the 15th-century classic The Imitation of Christ? It's been broadly popular for centuries among all Christian traditions, and its cultural importance makes it worth reading.
  • Jane in NC, Kareni, JennW in SoCal and 7 others like this

#126 Chrysalis Academy

Chrysalis Academy

    Amateur Bee Keeper

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 10063 posts

Posted 22 July 2017 - 08:17 AM

I finished Starfarers by Vonda McIntyre. This was another selection from the Utopian/Dystopian Great Course. I don't think it really fits the genre, it's more space opera, but I really enjoyed it! Good, interesting characters, and a super exciting cliffhanger finish. I'm going to try to get ahold of the rest of the series. The library doesn't have it.  I'm using this for my Outer Space square.

 

 


  • Jane in NC, Kareni, Stacia and 6 others like this

#127 Chrysalis Academy

Chrysalis Academy

    Amateur Bee Keeper

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 10063 posts

Posted 22 July 2017 - 08:43 AM

Silver lining of insomnia: I also finished Obedience to Authority, by Stanley Milgram. I was a Psych major, so I've read about the Milgram experiments many times, seen a documentary, and am familiar with the results. But I found reading the book very worthwhile.  It's such an important, landmark study, one that challenges us to face certain unpleasant realities of human nature, and one that really brings us face-to-face with our own history, no psychological distancing allowed. But it's also an example of such a well written, clearly communicated scientific report. Very little jargon, very good, concise, clear writing. I wish more scientific content was communicated this clearly, it's a good lesson.


  • Jane in NC, Kareni, Stacia and 6 others like this

#128 Matryoshka

Matryoshka

    Apprentice Bee Keeper

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 11055 posts

Posted 22 July 2017 - 09:05 AM

Hi Eliana!

 

Have no idea if you remember me; I've only recently joined BaW, but I remember your posts from the rest of the boards; always so thoughtful.  I hadn't realized you'd had a concussion.  Glad to hear you're starting to feel better and am so glad you're back!

 

 

Mars:

Kim Stanley Robinson's Red Mars is on my TBR shelf and I've heard many folks rave about it.

CL Moore's short story Shambleau is set on Mars. You can read it in The Best of CL Moore (which has a nice selection of her work, including my favorite of her stories "No Woman Born"
 

SF classics I read long ago:
Clarke's Sands of Mars

2 Heinlein juveniles  Podkayne of Mars and  Red Planet

An Asimov juvenile David Starr Space Ranger

Bradbury's Martian Chronicles

 

A juvenile/YA I read and reread as a young person and still reread fondly (though with a clearer eye for its flaws - do make sure you read the more recent edition): Journey Between Worlds

 

A juvenile I preread for my kids lately that is not one I will be returning to again, but had a sweetness under its absurdities that I found appealing.

Mars Evacuees

 

Books on my TBR shelf, but lower priority than the Robinson:

 

Empress of Mars

Genesis: An Epic Poem of Terraforming Mars

Desolation Road

 

So many great Mars books. :)  I have also read (and re-read) Martian Chronicles - it's one of my favorites.  I think I also read Podkayne of Mars when I was in high school.  I may re-read that as my "book you remember reading in high school" book...  Desolation Road looks interesting.  I see it described as García Márquez on Mars.  Now I have to decide if that's a good thing or a bad thing... :lol:

 

Empress of Mars also looks intriguing.  Also made me go look again at the similarly titled Edgar Rice Burroughs book (Princess of Mars).  I ate the whole Tarzan series when I was in high school, but could never get into John Carter of Mars.  Rereading the blurb, I think that's still true... 

 

Set in the 1970's

 

All the President's Men

Shah of Shah's

Mistry's A Fine Balance is set in the '70's, I believe.

Diana Wynne Jones's YA Dogsbody is a fantasy novel, but set in a very real English 1970's with background of the Troubles

Fitzgerald's The Bookshop

 

 

 

I just realized that a book I'm currently reading is set in the '70's (The Sympathizer) - but I'm using that for the Vietnam square, so I still need one of these. :)

 

Read and loved All The President's Men, but I'd rather a new one.  Read The Bookshop for a book group I used to be in and hated it with the fire of a thousand suns. ;)

 

A Fine Balance and Shah of Shah's both look really interesting.  I'm going to add both of them to my TR list and decide later. :D

 

ETA: there have been lots of posts since I started this reply, so much of what I've shared will probably not be useful since you've found so many solutions... but I'll leave this here in case you want more ideas.

 

More ideas always good!!!!

 

I believe you may be thinking of The Wanderers by Meg Howrey. 

 

An Amazon Best Book of March 2017: "The premise is simple: three astronauts – one American, one Russian, one Japanese – participate in a simulation of the first-ever mission to Mars before embarking on the real thing. They are selected as a trio based on complementary skills and personalities: unflappable, endlessly capable Helen is the oldest at 53, a widow with a brilliant but slightly off-kilter daughter; Sergei is the charismatic, hot-headed jokester of the crew (by astronaut standards) with two sons and a recent divorce; Yoshihiro is observant and good-natured, providing balance where needed. We learn about the astronauts' families as much as them as the book is told from alternating characters’ perspectives – including that of a team psychologist. The story stretches beyond the claustrophobic simulation to depict a Russian teenager exploring his emerging sexuality, a young virtual reality actress performing with equal parts ambition and angst, and a fiercely independent businesswoman struggling with the unspoken compromises of marriage. As the plot unfolds, the simulation, set in the Utah desert, becomes increasingly real, with each astronaut warping differently under the stress, loyalties straining to not fray. It’s addictive watching such highly disciplined characters discover what they can reveal to themselves and each other in months' long close quarters. Best of all, the author follows through on the questions raised: each astronaut writes letters to an important family member that are plaintive but plainspoken in what they reveal about what it means to be a mother, a husband, and a lover. For those lured by the Station Eleven comparison: that book’s a Vin Diesel movie compared to this one. This rewarding voyage within is more along the lines of The Martian, as conceived and written by Anne Patchett. —Katy Ball, The Amazon Book Review

 

 

Yes, thanks Kareni!  That was the book.  Seems like one of those that people either love or hate...

 

Set in PA - Heat & Light

 

Both Heat & Light and the On the Run book Eliana suggested sound interesting - thanks, both! 

 

Neil Gaiman - I'm with you, American Gods has been my least favorite Neil Gaiman so far. And I abandoned Neverwhere. Norse Gods was fine, but not stellar. But I loved Stardust, The Graveyard Book, and The Ocean at the End of the Lane.  Especially the latter.  Lovely book, I cried.  I highly recommend listening to an audio read by the author, that's what I did with Stardust and I'm sure I liked it more because of NG's reading.

 

 

 

 

 

Okay, Overdrive has Ocean at the End of the Lane on audio.  Think I'll try that one.

 

Philately - Going Postal by Terry Pratchett!! What else?

 

 

Oh and I absolutely adore Good Omens. Such a funny book. I might have to re-read that for my Laugh Out Loud square, nothing else has made me crack a chuckle so far.

 

 

 

Somewhat embarrassingly, I have never read any Pratchett.  I think I'll be remedying that soon.  I may try Wee Free Men for the imp square (there are impish elvish creatures in that one, right??), and you're right that Going Postal sounds perfect for Philately (is that one I can just jump in on without getting confused?)  Good Omens is on a shelf somewhere upstairs.  One of my dds is a huge Gaiman fan, but I can't ask her for recommendations because American Gods is her faaavorite and I don't like it, so there's a disconnect there somewhere.  Hopefully you're all right that adding Pratchett to the mix makes that one better. :)

 

Oh yes, absolutely. Very, very wrong.

 

Well, I'll just have to read it and decide later which box it will check. :D

 

For 240s, have you read the 15th-century classic The Imitation of Christ? It's been broadly popular for centuries among all Christian traditions, and its cultural importance makes it worth reading.

 

I found a free version on-line - the library doesn't have it.... but it looks readable and not too overwhelming; I think I may give it a try!  Or if I get bogged down in that one, maybe try Rose's suggestion of an Anne Lamott book, or Stacia's of reversing the numbers to 420 and finally finishing The Story of English that is on my shelf...


Edited by Matryoshka, 22 July 2017 - 09:06 AM.

  • Jane in NC, Kareni, Stacia and 8 others like this

#129 JennW in SoCal

JennW in SoCal

    Hive Mind Queen Bee

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 3458 posts

Posted 22 July 2017 - 09:28 AM

 

 

- Made into a Musical - has anyone else noticed that this is in Big Bingo twice?  I've already read The Wizard of Oz and Wicked.  What else is there?

 

 

 

Ohhhh -- something I know lots about, spending lots of time in the orchestra pit. Bonus points if you listen to the soundtrack or watch a movie version!

 

Oliver -- based on Oliver Twist

Secret Garden  (beautiful music with Mandy Patinkin is on the original Broadway recording)

Peter Pan

The King and I

Les Mis

South Pacific

Seussical the Musical (loosely based on several Seuss books)

Fiddler on the Roof (based on stories by Sholem Aleichem)

Guys and Dolls (based on short stories by Damon Runyon)

 

and of course musicals based on Fairy Tales

Cinderella (Rogers and Hammerstein)

Little Mermaid

Beauty and the Beast

Into the Woods

 

and musicals based off Biblical stories

Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat

Godspell

Jesus Christ Superstar

 

(the only 2 shows I have NOT played are Jesus Christ Superstar, the King and I!)

 

 

Great to see you, Eliana!

 

I'm off to another busy day at Comic-Con. No Hollywood promotional mayhem for me. I'm attending sci-fi and fantasy author panels, catching up with old friends and people watching. And keeping my husband fed while he is busy signing books and losing his voice!


Edited by JennW in SoCal, 22 July 2017 - 09:29 AM.

  • Jane in NC, Kareni, Angel and 10 others like this

#130 Chrysalis Academy

Chrysalis Academy

    Amateur Bee Keeper

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 10063 posts

Posted 22 July 2017 - 09:45 AM

 

Okay, Overdrive has Ocean at the End of the Lane on audio.  Think I'll try that one.

 

 

Somewhat embarrassingly, I have never read any Pratchett.  I think I'll be remedying that soon.  I may try Wee Free Men for the imp square (there are impish elvish creatures in that one, right??), and you're right that Going Postal sounds perfect for Philately (is that one I can just jump in on without getting confused?)  Good Omens is on a shelf somewhere upstairs.  One of my dds is a huge Gaiman fan, but I can't ask her for recommendations because American Gods is her faaavorite and I don't like it, so there's a disconnect there somewhere.  Hopefully you're all right that adding Pratchett to the mix makes that one better. :)

 

\

 

Actually, I had never read any Pratchett (other than Good Omens) either before Going Postal, although my kids have read the Tiffany Achung series. Yes, you can read Going Postal as a first Discworld entry, it's the first of a little sub-series set within the universe. There is also a pretty good film version of it which we recently watched.

 

I also have Pratchett's Pyramids on my list for the . . . wait for it . . . Pyramids square  ;)  :D

 

I must confess that I don't love Pratchett, I like him fine, but don't love him. I actually like the Gaiman books (minus American Gods) better than the Pratchett I've read. So I may be leading you astray . . . but I can definitely say that it's worth giving Gaiman a chance with something other than American Gods.


  • Jane in NC, Kareni, Stacia and 7 others like this

#131 mumto2

mumto2

    Hive Mind Empress Bee

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 6117 posts

Posted 22 July 2017 - 10:07 AM

I'm off to another busy day at Comic-Con. No Hollywood promotional mayhem for me. I'm attending sci-fi and fantasy author panels, catching up with old friends and people watching. And keeping my husband fed while he is busy signing books and losing his voice!


I am now looking forward to hearing about the books you come home with.....

I finished The Family Vault https://www.goodread...he_Family_Vault and loved it. I have actually started the next in this series. As a bonus rubies played an important role in this book which means I get to count it as my birthstone book for July. :) I am almost done spelling Ruby but was having a hard time finding a book I wanted to read with ruby in the title that I wanted to read.
  • Jane in NC, Kareni, Stacia and 5 others like this

#132 Kareni

Kareni

    BEEn here awhile

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 16081 posts

Posted 22 July 2017 - 11:12 AM

- Made into a Musical -

 

In addition to those Jenn mentioned above, there is  (what follows is from Wikipedia) "Spring Awakening (German: Frühlings Erwachen) (also translated as Spring's Awakening and The Awakening of Spring) is the German dramatist Frank Wedekind's first major play and a seminal work in the modern history of theatre.[1] It was written sometime between autumn 1890 and spring 1891, but did not receive its first performance until 20 November 1906 when it premiered at the Deutsches Theater in Berlin under the direction of Max Reinhardt. It carries the sub-title A Children's Tragedy.[2] The play criticises the sexually oppressive culture of nineteenth century (Fin de siècle) Germany and offers a vivid dramatisation of the erotic fantasies that it breeds.[3] Due to its controversial subject matter, the play has often been banned or censored."

 

I read the play (in English translation) before going to see the musical Spring Awakening.

 

Regards,

Kareni


  • Jane in NC, Stacia, aggieamy and 4 others like this

#133 Kareni

Kareni

    BEEn here awhile

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 16081 posts

Posted 22 July 2017 - 11:17 AM

A one day only currently free book for Kindle readers ~

 

The Vampyre: A Tale by John William Polidori 

 

"This classic vampire story has inspired generations of authors, from Bram Stoker to Charlaine Harris.

A young English gentleman of means, Aubrey is immediately intrigued by Lord Ruthven, the mysterious newcomer among society’s elite. His unknown origin and curious behavior tantalizes Aubrey’s imagination. But the young man soon discovers a sinister character hidden behind his new friend’s glamorous facade.
 
When the two are set upon by bandits while traveling together in Europe, Ruthven is fatally injured. Before drawing his last breath, he makes the odd request that Aubrey keep his death and crimes secret for a year and a day. But when Ruthven resurfaces in London—making overtures toward Aubrey’s sister—Aubrey realizes this immortal fiend is a vampyre.
 
John William Polidori’s The Vampyre is both a classic tale of gothic horror and the progenitor of the modern romantic vampire myth that has been fodder for artists ranging from Anne Rice to Alan Ball to Francis Ford Coppola. Originally published in 1819, many decades before Bram Stoker’s Dracula, and misattributed to Polidori’s friend Lord Byron, The Vampyre has kept readers up at night for nearly two hundred years."

 

Regards,

Kareni

 


  • Jane in NC, Stacia, aggieamy and 4 others like this

#134 Robin M

Robin M

    Book nerd and cat wrangler

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 5529 posts

Posted 22 July 2017 - 04:26 PM

Hi Eliana, welcome back!!!

 

 

 

 

So, apparently Dewey Decimal 240 is Christian moral and devotional theology.  No wonder there's nothing in my library up here in secular heathen land. :tongue_smilie:  I have no idea where even to start with that.  Anyone have a book that would work for a super-duper liberal Christian?  Think UCC, but I've also read some good stuff by Episcopalians.  The books in my TR list are apparently filed under "Jesus and His Family" (232) and "New Testament" (225).

Check out Thomas Merton's Seven Storey Mountain which I thoroughly enjoyed. Possibly C.S. Lewis or G.K. Chesterton.  Anne Lamott is a great suggestion and maybe Anne Dillard as well. 

 

 

 


  • Jane in NC, Kareni, Eliana and 7 others like this

#135 Matryoshka

Matryoshka

    Apprentice Bee Keeper

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 11055 posts

Posted 22 July 2017 - 06:18 PM

Check out Thomas Merton's Seven Storey Mountain which I thoroughly enjoyed. Possibly C.S. Lewis or G.K. Chesterton.  Anne Lamott is a great suggestion and maybe Anne Dillard as well. 

 

A good suggestion, but it's not a 240 book, or even nearby.  It's listed under 920 Biography.  :rolleyes:   Wouldja believe how tough this is?

 

I just went and read the first book of Imitation of Christ that I found for free online (there are four books/sections, but they seem reasonably short).  Apparently it's a 242, and I'm going to call it good enough.  :hat:


  • Jane in NC, Kareni, Eliana and 8 others like this

#136 Melissa M

Melissa M

    Bookish and Odd

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 810 posts

Posted 22 July 2017 - 07:20 PM

Eliana.

So happy to type your name here that I will do it again. Eliana.

Stay. You're on the best couch in the virtual living room.
  • Jane in NC, Ali in OR, Kareni and 9 others like this

#137 Butter

Butter

    Hive Mind Level 6 Worker: Scout Bee

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 5911 posts

Posted 22 July 2017 - 07:24 PM

Today I read The Legend of King Arthur by Stephen Klein.  It was... bad.  The grammar was horrible.  There was lots of repetition.  I kind of felt like I was reading a really long version of a high school kid's essay and they had to pad it to make it long enough.  It covered the actual history leading up to when some historians believe when the real King Arthur lived and then covered the stories of King Arthur and Camelot and when certain characters were added and what not.  That stuff was good, but it was really overshadowed by the awful writing.


  • Jane in NC, Kareni, aggieamy and 5 others like this

#138 Mom-ninja.

Mom-ninja.

    Apprentice Bee Keeper

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 13002 posts

Posted 22 July 2017 - 07:31 PM

 

 

 

 

I've only read American Gods.  But so many people raved about that book that now I'm wary.  If the next one is as disappointing, I'm probably done with him.  I think I saw Rose or someone read Stardust and really liked it recently?  Anyone else think American Gods was totally underwhelming but really likes something else by Gaiman?  (If you want to know my particular issues with AG, the Goodreads review by David Katzman - it's only a few down from the top - is pretty much spot-on imho).

 

 

I did not like American Gods at all. However, I loved Ocean at the End of the Lane and The Graveyard book. 

 

 

 I don't care for him (or Terry Pratchett) 

 

Oh, dear. It's okay. I will overlook this flaw. It won't affect our friendship. :D

 

 

 

Eliana, welcome back! I hope you have a full recovery.


  • Jane in NC, Kareni, Eliana and 7 others like this

#139 mumto2

mumto2

    Hive Mind Empress Bee

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 6117 posts

Posted 23 July 2017 - 05:39 AM

I have read two books by Pratchett and found both simply OK. Honestly probably would have quit both if they hadn't been connected to a BaW challenge. Dd, who adores Pratchett, assures me I just made poor choices.

I have had American Gods in the stack but never actually made it beyond a few pages. I actually liked the few minutes of the tv series I watched....dh hated it. :lol: I may try again because of the tv show. I certainly don't say that often! :) ;)

Can't remember if I already posted about how much I am looking forward to The Rise and Fall of DODO by Stephenson https://www.theguard...-of-dodo-review. I have never managed to read one of his either. I hope I'm not disappointed.


I'm waiting for my laundry to finish so I can hang it up and have been catching up on my blogs while I wait.
Thought someone here might find this as sweet as I do. This woman crochets little hearts and leaves them for strangers to find to brighten people's day, rather like some of us and reading material! Click the link within this link to see her bathtub of hearts project https://itsallinanut...sharing-hearts/.
  • Jane in NC, Kareni, loesje22000 and 6 others like this

#140 Quill

Quill

    Team Introvert - Captain

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 17405 posts

Posted 23 July 2017 - 06:00 AM

Matroyshka, you might like If Grace is True. https://www.amazon.c...y philip gulley
  • Jane in NC, Kareni, Matryoshka and 5 others like this

#141 Matryoshka

Matryoshka

    Apprentice Bee Keeper

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 11055 posts

Posted 23 July 2017 - 09:17 AM

Matroyshka, you might like If Grace is True. https://www.amazon.c...y philip gulley

 

Perhaps, but it's 232 (same as two books already on my TR list)...  Nope, I'm just going to have to learn how to be a medieval monk. :lol:

 

It would be really interesting to know what books are actually in 240, or even anywhere else in the 240's...


  • Jane in NC, Kareni, Quill and 2 others like this

#142 loesje22000

loesje22000

    Amateur Bee Keeper

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 3664 posts

Posted 23 July 2017 - 10:29 AM

Perhaps, but it's 232 (same as two books already on my TR list)... Nope, I'm just going to have to learn how to be a medieval monk. :lol:

It would be really interesting to know what books are actually in 240, or even anywhere else in the 240's...


Not sure if 240 is the same everywhere,
But the 240 series in Flanders is about Catholic Doctrine.
Not biographies or history.
  • Jane in NC, Kareni, aggieamy and 1 other like this

#143 Matryoshka

Matryoshka

    Apprentice Bee Keeper

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 11055 posts

Posted 23 July 2017 - 11:04 AM

Not sure if 240 is the same everywhere,
But the 240 series in Flanders is about Catholic Doctrine.
Not biographies or history.

 

Exactly.  The general 240 category is "Christian Practice and Observance" - Not general "Christianity", which is 230's.

 

240 itself is "Christian Moral and Devotional Theology"

 

242 (where Imitation of Christ fits) is more specifically "Devotional Literature"

 

250's through 270's are also about other aspects of Christianity, and 220's is "The Bible", which is why generally a book about Christianity is not necessarily going to be in the 240's...

 

(It's not specifically Catholic here, though, just Christian.  280 is "The Roman Catholic Church")

 

And... reading through Wikipedia's list of Dewey's is making me wonder about those numbers that say they are no longer in use.  Apparently 288 used to be Unitarian and 298 used to be Mormonism, now those numbers are must not used?  Where are books about those classified now, then??


  • Kareni, aggieamy and mumto2 like this

#144 Violet Crown

Violet Crown

    Onward Thru the Fog

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 4178 posts

Posted 23 July 2017 - 11:58 AM

Perhaps, but it's 232 (same as two books already on my TR list)... Nope, I'm just going to have to learn how to be a medieval monk. :lol:

It would be really interesting to know what books are actually in 240, or even anywhere else in the 240's...

There's the 14th-century mystical work "The Cloud of Unknowing," which I have read twice and concluded that I have no mystical charisms whatsoever; but it's still pretty interesting. Also in the 240s, St Teresa of Avila's "The Interior Castle" and St John of the Cross's "Dark Night of the Soul."

ETA: A more modern classic in the 240s is the great Anglican writer, intellectual, and pacificst Evelyn Underhill's "Mysticism." On reflection, I think you might really like her work.

Edited by Violet Crown, 23 July 2017 - 12:09 PM.

  • Kareni, Matryoshka, loesje22000 and 5 others like this

#145 Matryoshka

Matryoshka

    Apprentice Bee Keeper

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 11055 posts

Posted 23 July 2017 - 12:35 PM

There's the 14th-century mystical work "The Cloud of Unknowing," which I have read twice and concluded that I have no mystical charisms whatsoever; but it's still pretty interesting. Also in the 240s, St Teresa of Avila's "The Interior Castle" and St John of the Cross's "Dark Night of the Soul."

ETA: A more modern classic in the 240s is the great Anglican writer, intellectual, and pacificst Evelyn Underhill's "Mysticism." On reflection, I think you might really like her work.

 

This one piqued my interest, as intellectual pacifist Anglican mystic is definitely more in my wheelhouse than medieval Monk. ;)

 

The book you mentioned is 500+ pages, though, and I'm not sure I want to read that much for this square... but I found she also wrote a collection of essays The Essentials of Mysticism, which is in my library's consortium, if not on the shelf locally, so I've put that on hold.  I figure I could always read an essay or two if I decide not to read the whole thing (which is only a bit over 200 pp anyway).  Or I could finish the other 2/3 of Imitation of Christ, which actually isn't a difficult read...  but I think I'll put the rest of that off for now to see how I like Evelyn Underhill's essays... (both her books are classified 248, so I'm counting that as good...)   :D


Edited by Matryoshka, 23 July 2017 - 12:36 PM.

  • Kareni, loesje22000, aggieamy and 3 others like this

#146 Violet Crown

Violet Crown

    Onward Thru the Fog

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 4178 posts

Posted 23 July 2017 - 12:41 PM

This one piqued my interest, as intellectual pacifist Anglican mystic is definitely more in my wheelhouse than medieval Monk. ;)

The book you mentioned is 500+ pages, though, and I'm not sure I want to read that much for this square... but I found she also wrote a collection of essays The Essentials of Mysticism, which is in my library's consortium, if not on the shelf locally, so I've put that on hold. I figure I could always read an essay or two if I decide not to read the whole thing (which is only a bit over 200 pp anyway). Or I could finish the other 2/3 of Imitation of Christ, which actually isn't a difficult read... but I think I'll put the rest of that off for now to see how I like Evelyn Underhill's essays... (both her books are classified 248, so I'm counting that as good...) :D


The medieval monks forgive you. ;) Let me know how you like Underhill. I've only ever read bits of her writing, so if you choose to delve deeper, I might join you.
  • Kareni, JennW in SoCal, loesje22000 and 4 others like this

#147 Robin M

Robin M

    Book nerd and cat wrangler

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 5529 posts

Posted 23 July 2017 - 01:16 PM

Link to week 30 - please continue conversation in new thread



#148 Lori D.

Lori D.

    Amateur Bee Keeper

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 11492 posts

Posted 23 July 2017 - 05:05 PM

..."Random book from the 240 shelf in your library:"  There are NO books in the 240 category in my library... So does anyone have any idea what the heck is the actual topic of 240?  How about 241-249??  HELP!

 

My library doesn't seem to have any either. The subject area for 240 appears to be "Christian Moral and Devotional Theology":

241 = Christian Ethics

242 = Devotional Literature

243 = Evangelistic writings for individuals and families

[244 = no longer used -- formerly Religious Fiction]

[245 = no longer used -- formerly Hymnology]

246 = Use of art in Christinaity

247 = Church furnishings & related articles

248 = Christian Experience, Practice, and Life

249 = Christian Observances in Family Life (Devotional Guides)

 

 

...Here are some easier categories I'd love suggestions for... Mars - this one should be easy for me, since I love SciFi.  I just read The Martian last year, so that's out.  Radiance would work, but it's already happily filling another category.  Any other good ideas?...

 

Mars -- if you don't mind OLD sci-fi ;)

- The Martian Chronicles (Bradbury)

- War of the Worlds (HG Wells) -- the attacking aliens are from Mars

 

 

...Here are some easier categories I'd love suggestions for...  Author who uses a pen name - not up for Middlemarch atm.  Just re-read Silas Marner a few years ago.  Who should I be looking at other than George Eliot?  ;)  No serial romance writers, please (don't many of those use pen names?)...

 

Pen Names -- some fun ones from this Wikipedia list  :)

pen name --> real name

 

- Anne Rice --> Howard Allen Frances O'Brien

- Acton Bell --> Anne Bronte

- Currer Bell --> Charlotte Bronte

- Ellis Bell --> Emily Bronte

 

- Dr. Seuss --> Theodore Geisel

- Edith Van Dyne --> L. Frank Baum

- Isak Dinesen --> Karen Blixen

- JD Robb --> Nora Roberts

- John Lange --> Michael Crichton

 

- John Sedges --> Pearl S. Buck

- Jonathon Oldstyle --> Washington Irving

- Mark Twain --> Samuel Langhorne Clemens

- Mary Westmacott --> Agatha Christie

- NW Clerk --> CS Lewis

 

- Nancy Boyd --> Edna St. Vincent Millay

- Ogdred Weary --> Edward Gorey

- PL Travers --> Helen Goff

- O. Henry --> William Sydney Porter

- Paul French --> Isaac Asimov

 

- Robert Galbraith; Newt Scamander; Kennilworthy Whisp --> JK Rowling

- Saki --> Hector Hugh Munro

- Silence Dogood; Martha Careful --> Benjamin Franklin

- Sylvia Plath --> Victoria Lucas

 

 

...Here are some easier categories I'd love suggestions for...  Has pretty pictures - any suggestions?...

 

Has Pretty Pictures

- Griffin & Sabine trilogy (Bantock)

- JRR Tolkien Artist and Illustrator (Hammond) -- non-fiction

 

 

...Here are some easier categories I'd love suggestions for... Made into a Musical - has anyone else noticed that this is in Big Bingo twice?  I've already read The Wizard of Oz and Wicked.  What else is there?...

 

Made into a Musical

- Romeo and Juliette (Shakespeare) --> West Side Story

- Oliver Twist (Dickens) --> Oliver!

- Phantom of the Opera (Leroux) --> Phantom

- Gentlemen Prefer Blondes (Loos) --> same title

- Big Fish: A Novel of Mythic Proportions (Wallace) --> Big Fish

 

 

...Here are some easier categories I'd love suggestions for ...  Neil Gaiman - Read American Gods and was disappointed.  What should I read instead?

 

Neil Gaiman

- The Graveyard Book

- Sandman -- graphic novel


Edited by Lori D., 23 July 2017 - 05:08 PM.

  • Chrysalis Academy likes this

#149 LaughingCat

LaughingCat

    Chief Cat Herder

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 1355 posts

Posted 24 July 2017 - 07:17 PM

 

Re: my own reading. I finally started Ready Player one yesterday. I actually had a hard time slogging through about the first 75-100 pages. I almost gave up but kept sticking it out because my ds really wants me to read it, plus I've heard great reviews from friends. Finally, around page 100, the story/action kicked in, so it's a bit better now. Hoping I'll like it better from this point forward. (Ds seems to think I will.)

I found the whole first section of the 3 hard going and came so close to giving up -- but I ended up really enjoying it even though it is clearly 'written to be made into a movie'   

 

Perhaps, but it's 232 (same as two books already on my TR list)...  Nope, I'm just going to have to learn how to be a medieval monk. :lol:

 

It would be really interesting to know what books are actually in 240, or even anywhere else in the 240's...

Here's some at 241  (my library's 'old' catelog allows you to see what books are on the shelf next to the book you are looking at -- and the first book I found trying to google 204's was at 241)

 

 

  • Title 241.4 FOST 2005 Author Freedom of simplicity : finding harmony in a complex world / Richard J. Foster. Foster, Richard J. Pub date
  • Title 241.4 FRAN Author The name of God is mercy : a conversation with Andrea Tornielli / Pope Francis ; translated from the Italian by Oonagh Stransky. Francis, Pope, 1936- Pub date
  • Title 241.4 FRAN 3-DISCS Author The name of God is mercy [sound recording] / Pope Francis. Francis, Pope, 1936- Pub date
  • Title 241.4 H659S 2000 Author Standing for something [text (large print)] : ten neglected virtues that will heal our hearts and homes / Gordon B. Hinckley, forward by Mike Wallace. Hinckley, Gordon Bitner, 1910-2008. Pub date
  • Title 241.4 HARR Author Living virtuously : a wife's complete guide to keeping her heart and home / Erin Harrison. Harrison, Erin. Pub date
  • Title 241.4 M283R Author Ruthless trust : the ragamuffin's path to God / Brennan Manning. Manning, Brennan. Pub date
  • Title 241.4 M612A Author The approval fix : how to break free from people pleasing / Joyce Meyer. Meyer, Joyce, 1943- Pub date
  • Title 241.4 M612E Author Eat the cookie-- buy the shoes : giving yourself permission to lighten up / Joyce Meyer. Meyer, Joyce, 1943- Pub date
  • Title 241.4 M821B Author Breaking free : making liberty in Christ a reality in life / Beth Moore with Dale McCleskey. Moore, Beth, 1957- Pub date
  • Title 241.4 O85E Author Every day a Friday : how to be happier 7 days a week / Joel Osteen. Osteen, Joel. Pub date
  • Title 241.4 O85EV 8-CDS Author Every day a Friday [sound recording] : how to be happier 7 days a week / Joel Osteen. Osteen, Joel. Pub date
  • Title 241.4 P617R Author The rewards of simplicity : a practical and spiritual approach / Pam & Chuck D. Pierce. Pierce, Pam. Pub date
  • Title 241.4 S193E Author Enough : contentment in an age of excess / Will Samson. Samson, Will, 1964-
  • Title 241.4 FOST 2005 Author Freedom of simplicity : finding harmony in a complex world / Richard J. Foster. Foster, Richard J. Pub date
  • Title 241.4 FRAN Author The name of God is mercy : a conversation with Andrea Tornielli / Pope Francis ; translated from the Italian by Oonagh Stransky. Francis, Pope, 1936- Pub date
  • Title 241.4 FRAN 3-DISCS Author The name of God is mercy [sound recording] / Pope Francis. Francis, Pope, 1936- Pub date
  • Title 241.4 H659S 2000 Author Standing for something [text (large print)] : ten neglected virtues that will heal our hearts and homes / Gordon B. Hinckley, forward by Mike Wallace. Hinckley, Gordon Bitner, 1910-2008. Pub date
  • Title 241.4 HARR Author Living virtuously : a wife's complete guide to keeping her heart and home / Erin Harrison. Harrison, Erin. Pub date
  • Title 241.4 M283R Author Ruthless trust : the ragamuffin's path to God / Brennan Manning. Manning, Brennan. Pub date
  • Title 241.4 M612A Author The approval fix : how to break free from people pleasing / Joyce Meyer. Meyer, Joyce, 1943- Pub date
  • Title 241.4 M612E Author Eat the cookie-- buy the shoes : giving yourself permission to lighten up / Joyce Meyer. Meyer, Joyce, 1943- Pub date
  • Title 241.4 M821B Author Breaking free : making liberty in Christ a reality in life / Beth Moore with Dale McCleskey. Moore, Beth, 1957- Pub date
  • Title 241.4 O85E Author Every day a Friday : how to be happier 7 days a week / Joel Osteen. Osteen, Joel. Pub date
  • Title 241.4 O85EV 8-CDS Author Every day a Friday [sound recording] : how to be happier 7 days a week / Joel Osteen. Osteen, Joel. Pub date
  • Title 241.4 P617R Author The rewards of simplicity : a practical and spiritual approach / Pam & Chuck D. Pierce. Pierce, Pam. Pub date

(edited to remove a bunch of trash that looked like nice pics before I posted :)  )


Edited by LaughingCat, 24 July 2017 - 07:23 PM.

  • Chrysalis Academy and mumto2 like this

#150 Mom-ninja.

Mom-ninja.

    Apprentice Bee Keeper

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 13002 posts

Posted 24 July 2017 - 08:54 PM

Well. I'm gonna have to visit my library and look up 240 now. 


  • Chrysalis Academy and mumto2 like this