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Eye issue. Anyone BTDT? (small update #47)


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#51 heartlikealion

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Posted 31 May 2017 - 07:39 PM

One of my son's has deep set eyes so while one looked a little out of alignment I never thought much of it and his pediatrician didn't catch it. In Kindergarten a nurse caught it. One eye was turning in more and I took him in. He ended up having strabismus with amblyopia. It went untreated so he lost most of the sight in his left eye and we didn't know it. His eyeball is fine it is at the level or the brain...he is cortically blind. So they fit him with glasses (even though it won't help that eye) and we started patching. We signed him up for vision therapy and it is doing a lot better now. Every month he gets a little better. Poor kiddo has no depth perception so they are trying to help him gain some and recover sight.

 

Oh man, sounds complicated. I asked about patching but she said that if anything like that was done they could probably just cover up one side of the glasses rather than try to get her to wear a patch?

 

Go to a pediatric ophthalmologist.  That is who will fix amblyopia or strabismus.  Most know enough about neuro-ophthalmology to determine if that is the cause.

 

An optometrist will just refer you to a pediatric ophthalmologist anyways.

 

(I had surgery for both when I was three.  Back then, it was an overnight procedure....these days, it's out patient.  You will still likely do patching exercises and such. )

 

That is who we are seeing, a pediatric ophthalmologist. We just wanted to see someone right away and get some feedback while we waited. Although, she made it sound like he's just going to talk about surgery as a solution?? She said definitely keep the appt, he can probably get her prescription more easily than she could.

 

If she struggled like that at this appointment, is there anyway you can take your husband with you for her June appointment? We've been doing this for years, but I still have to take dh to the one appointment per year where they dialate ds's eyes. It takes three of us- someone holding him, one his head, and one his eyelids, for them to be able to get the spray in. He's five and knows what is coming every May. We go every three months and have no issues the other appointments but the dilation thing is never fun for them. It burns and is uncomfortable and I don't blame them for hating it.

Sorry you didn't get much out of today, I think your June appointment will give you the info you need to take a breath. Hang in there! And thanks for the update!

 

Oh, wow. Yes, my dh is going to the June appt.! He had already planned on it, but hearing how today went he reminded me that he will be at the June one.


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#52 heartlikealion

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Posted 05 June 2017 - 02:17 PM

So check this out. I took ds to the COVD optometrist and had dd with me. The dr noticed her eye in the waiting room and asked if she could see her, too (no extra charge). I was thrilled. The dr. is wonderful and agreed that dd needs glasses. So does ds. One kid is near sighted and one is far sighted. She said go ahead and see what the ophthalmologist says about prescription but he will suggest surgery and in her opinion it is not the answer. She gave me her backstory about her spouse and child that have eye issues. One had surgery 3x in their life and one did not. The surgery seemed to only fix things cosmetically not functionality-wise. Dd is favoring her right side of her body which helps explain why the left eye is the weaker one. The dr had the kids do some exercises around the office to demonstrate the body favoritism. It was eye opening (no pun intended). I said I wonder how long this has been going on... she had torticollis and I thought that was mostly straightened out but maybe this is related. Her spouse actually works at the same medical place as the ophthalmologist we are seeing and has talked to him about this type of thing, which is why she's pretty sure she knows what he will say.

 

I'm so glad my kids are getting help. I am kicking myself a little for not getting ds in sooner. It was hard during the school year so we waited til summer and then dd started having noticeable issues, but looking back at old photos I did notice one from a year ago where one eye was going in. This also could explain some of the gross motor issues ds faces. His Bender Gestalt test results might have been screwy because he didn't wear glasses during the test. So nice to connect some of the dots.


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#53 scholastica

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Posted 05 June 2017 - 03:08 PM

So check this out. I took ds to the COVD optometrist and had dd with me. The dr noticed her eye in the waiting room and asked if she could see her, too (no extra charge). I was thrilled. The dr. is wonderful and agreed that dd needs glasses. So does ds. One kid is near sighted and one is far sighted. She said go ahead and see what the ophthalmologist says about prescription but he will suggest surgery and in her opinion it is not the answer. She gave me her backstory about her spouse and child that have eye issues. One had surgery 3x in their life and one did not. The surgery seemed to only fix things cosmetically not functionality-wise. Dd is favoring her right side of her body which helps explain why the left eye is the weaker one. The dr had the kids do some exercises around the office to demonstrate the body favoritism. It was eye opening (no pun intended). I said I wonder how long this has been going on... she had torticollis and I thought that was mostly straightened out but maybe this is related. Her spouse actually works at the same medical place as the ophthalmologist we are seeing and has talked to him about this type of thing, which is why she's pretty sure she knows what he will say.

I'm so glad my kids are getting help. I am kicking myself a little for not getting ds in sooner. It was hard during the school year so we waited til summer and then dd started having noticeable issues, but looking back at old photos I did notice one from a year ago where one eye was going in. This also could explain some of the gross motor issues ds faces. His Bender Gestalt test results might have been screwy because he didn't wear glasses during the test. So nice to connect some of the dots.


He may or may not suggest surgery. It's usually not the first line of defense. My kid who needed surgery was in glasses for 6 or 7 years before surgery became necessary. Surgery was only necessary because the glasses no longer controlled the turning. In all my other kids, the turning in has been controlled completely by glasses.
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#54 heartlikealion

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Posted 05 June 2017 - 03:11 PM

He may or may not suggest surgery. It's usually not the first line of defense. My kid who needed surgery was in glasses for 6 or 7 years before surgery became necessary. Surgery was only necessary because the glasses no longer controlled the turning. In all my other kids, the turning in has been controlled completely by glasses.

 

Both the optometrists we have seen recently said they suspect that the ophthalmologist will promote surgery and know the specific dr I am going to see. But they could be wrong I guess, depending on certain factors. Maybe that was primarily a hunch. When she saw the first optometrist they said that glasses did not appear to control the turn. But the second one said she thinks we can work on things to help her use that side of the body which keeps the eye straight.


Edited by heartlikealion, 05 June 2017 - 03:12 PM.


#55 Jaybee

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Posted 05 June 2017 - 03:22 PM

Interesting. Glad you are getting these appointments now rather than waiting. Our ped ophthalmologist never mentioned surgery at all. Our baby had his glasses in a week, and they held his eyes straight.


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#56 heartlikealion

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Posted 05 June 2017 - 04:13 PM

She's so accident prone that I am really really hoping this will help her from falling so much!! She's already had two major falls -- one resulted in stitches in the mouth and a whole tooth got knocked out. The other resulted in a trip to the ER and dermabond glue. Granted she tripped over a shoe and landed in the coffee table... something maybe any toddler could do. The other time we weren't sure what caused the fall but she landed on her straw sippy cup.



#57 medawyn

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Posted 05 June 2017 - 04:30 PM

I think our dd's are about the same age.  My little one had pretty severe esotropia (crossed eyes); it was noticeable from birth.  We were finally referred to a pediatric ophthalmologist at 6 months, although because of job changes/insurance changes/moves we didn't actually start treatment until closer to 18 months.  

 

Your DD is young yet, so there's lots of time to diagnose and treat whatever her issue may be.  And take heart, even if she is resistant in the appointment, you might find her very receptive to treatment.  My exceedingly stubborn 2.5 yo has handled treatment well, because I think it's a relief to see better.

 

In our case we opted for surgery (she's had two), but her eyes were EXTREMELY crossed.  You would not have gotten to age two without noticing it - other kids commented on it when we were in public starting around 9 months.  We've also done patching and some glasses, although right now she's not wearing either and doing fine.  

 

Our pediatric ophthalmologist is fabulous and so is her staff.  She's great with tiny kids who are wiggly, uncooperative, and not able to give much if any verbal feedback.  (My very loquacious girl won't say a word in the doctor's office.)  I'm always impressed with how much information she's able to garner without a lot of help from her patient.  Early treatment has definitely helped preserve my DD's eye sight.  I suspect that down the road we might end up doing vision therapy for convergence issues; dd has definitely lost some peripheral vision, but we really won't have a super clear idea the extent until she's able to communicate better.  

 

Hopefully your pediatric ophthalmologist gives you a clear idea if something is wrong and you can explore some treatment options.  Initial appointments usually do take a long time to get, so it's awesome you'll be getting in so quickly.


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#58 RootAnn

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Posted 05 June 2017 - 05:45 PM

One of my kids has intermittent accommodative esotropia. (Or, something like that. Hard to even remember back when they told me the name & what it meant.) A neighbor noticed it & told me to get her in right away. She was either almost 2 or almost 3. I can't remember now. Our pediatrician gave us the name of these pediatric eye doctors in The Big City (1 1/2 hrs away).

 

The appointment was horrible - they didn't listen to a word I said (about letting DD warm up to them). Everything had to be done RIGHT THEN because there were zillions of other kids in the waiting room - some having driven eight hours for their appointment. They ended up sending people in to hold her down & dilate her eyes, sent us out in the waiting room for 15-20 minutes, then brought us back in. (DD kicking & screaming because of how they treated her the first time.) I vowed to never return.

 

Went to our local optometrist. He spent a ton of time with her & we've never gone back to the other place. At the beginning, her prescription changed every 3-6 months. Her eye doesn't turn now (without glasses) unless she's really tired.

 

There was a blogging site for kids with eye issues that was really helpful for me. I'll check my other computer for the link & add a post if I remember. I assume they are still keeping up the site (sight!) - just with new moms/kids as the other ones 'graduate' out.

 

ETA:  It might be somewhere in this list. Good list to start with!


Edited by RootAnn, 05 June 2017 - 05:46 PM.

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#59 umsami

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Posted 05 June 2017 - 05:56 PM

She's so accident prone that I am really really hoping this will help her from falling so much!! She's already had two major falls -- one resulted in stitches in the mouth and a whole tooth got knocked out. The other resulted in a trip to the ER and dermabond glue. Granted she tripped over a shoe and landed in the coffee table... something maybe any toddler could do. The other time we weren't sure what caused the fall but she landed on her straw sippy cup.

 

This was a problem for me before surgery.  I kept falling and bumping into things.    After, no longer a problem.  (My Mom actually wrote a book about my surgery called "New Eyes for Umsami" (well my name)....that the ophthalmologist used to give out.

 

There is a limited time to fix the issues so that the brain will still "see" out of both eyes (the goal--true binocular vision).  I do not recommend postponing surgery for that reason.   I'll also add that the cosmetic improvements offered by actual surgery matter too.  As somebody whose eye sometimes appeared crossed, it is very off-putting for others....and was a source of teasing (especially as it often showed in school photos.)  


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#60 RootAnn

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Posted 05 June 2017 - 07:35 PM

Aha! It was Little Four Eyes (blog). It has stuff about patching, glasses, and surgery. I always like to do lots & lots of research. If you have time, it would be good to do some reading. 

 

I forgot to mention in my previous post that my DH had eye issues when he was young & had at least one surgery. His eyes don't work together. He uses one to see far away & the other for close up work, but they don't work as a team. I wrote a blog post shortly after DD was prescribed progressive lenses.

 

Good luck with the prescriptions! We didn't have trouble getting my dd to wear her glasses, thankfully. We did have a lot of issues with glasses breaking for the first 5-10 years.  :lol: Our local shop had replacement plans ($5 if they had to reorder the glasses, free fixes if they could do it in-shop) which were a life-saver many times. We also had a backup pair of glasses and lenses for the first several years, but that got expensive fast.


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#61 heartlikealion

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Posted 05 June 2017 - 10:49 PM

Thank you for sharing your different experiences with surgery and whatnot. I will look at the blog when I get a chance. I have been looking online for "miraflex" or something similar. I think that might be good for dd. And with the band behind the head so she doesn't yank them off/knock them off and destroy them as easily. I did not see what I was looking for on zenni optical :( I'll have to get both kids glasses and we do not have vision insurance so I was wondering if I could find them cheaper online.



#62 heartlikealion

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Posted 08 June 2017 - 04:22 PM

We saw the ophthalmologist. He said he doesn't think she needs surgery now. Wants to just try glasses, see how that goes. Then possibly a patch if need be. We'll revisit in so many weeks.

 

I tried to get the lenses made right away but the optometrist was closing so I'm gonna fax over her prescription. They aren't open tomorrow, either so I figure the process might not start til Monday. By then I should have the frames, though. I just hope they fit. The lenses are actually getting sent off and then they will be cut to fit my frames. I think it'll all work out but might be a slow process so I was trying to be proactive by ordering frames and requesting lenses asap.


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#63 SKL

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Posted 08 June 2017 - 04:37 PM

Just wanted to agree with someone above that surgery may not fix the problem.  My sister had surgery and still has a wandering eye.

 

I'm glad you were able to see all those professionals and they have relatively non-invasive ideas to help your daughter.  Based on my personal experience, I would follow up with the vision therapy even if the ophthalmologist doesn't recommend it.


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#64 heartlikealion

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Posted 08 June 2017 - 05:15 PM

Just wanted to agree with someone above that surgery may not fix the problem.  My sister had surgery and still has a wandering eye.

 

I'm glad you were able to see all those professionals and they have relatively non-invasive ideas to help your daughter.  Based on my personal experience, I would follow up with the vision therapy even if the ophthalmologist doesn't recommend it.

 

That must be so frustrating for her. Thank you for sharing. Yes, I am relieved nothing invasive has been suggested right now. It did sound like surgery might be on the table for the future, but I wasn't asking about it. Dh just asked about LASIK or something down the line. I'm just focused on the here and now. I'll try to get her using the other side of the body more and wear her glasses as much as possible once we get them.



#65 Jaybee

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Posted 08 June 2017 - 09:17 PM

We had no trouble at all getting our 13 month old to wear his glasses after the first few hours. He took them off in the car on the way home. Then he took them off at home and threw them on the floor. When I put them back on him, he left them on. And very soon didn't even like to take them off for his bath or for bed. Once they realize they can see, there usually isn't much of a problem with usage.


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#66 scoutingmom

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Posted 09 June 2017 - 12:19 AM

Same with my then 18mo. Wore her glasses with no issues after a few hours.

One little story.

When I was getting the glasses fitted, the optician mentioned a few things we might notice because of her far sittedness. One of the things that fit was my daughter had always been extremely cautious about transitions on the floor... apparently she could see a difference but not see what it was. (I also got to see her stare into the mirror as she saw her own face clearly fir the first time.)

Anyway, my dh wasn't so sure about the glasses and how could they figure out the prescription so young. When my daughter was first wearing them in the car and took them off, he told me to let her have a break. We went to a park, and all the kids were playing in the grass. I went and sat in a chair beside dh. Well, between our daughter and us was a dark line caused by the shade of a tree. Daughter started to come to us, but stopped just at thd line and started to look a bit anxious. I mentioned what the optician had said about the transitions, and dh, not thinking it would make a difference, said, "well, put them on". So I put them on her... and then she was running around on the grass with the other kids, coming back and forth to us and the kids, with no concern or pause at the shadows at all. My dh was convinced. And I don't recall her ever taking them off (except at bedtime etc) again!

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#67 Jaybee

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Posted 09 June 2017 - 07:22 PM

One other little note about usage--apparently, when I was little (started wearing glasses at 2) and my glasses got so dirty I couldn't see clearly, I would take them off and leave them wherever I was at the time. It caused my mom some stress as I wasn't always able to remember where I had taken them off. Just an FYI.


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#68 scoutingmom

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Posted 09 June 2017 - 09:53 PM

One other little note about usage--apparently, when I was little (started wearing glasses at 2) and my glasses got so dirty I couldn't see clearly, I would take them off and leave them wherever I was at the time. It caused my mom some stress as I wasn't always able to remember where I had taken them off. Just an FYI.

Glasses can get too dirty to see through? who knew? (Tmi... I have had glasses since age 3 and do not wash them often enough...)

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#69 heartlikealion

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Posted 10 June 2017 - 12:50 PM

Mine always get dirty! I always forget to use those wipes I have. The frames arrived. They look good, but ds isn't sure if they fit properly. He's never worn glasses so he said maybe that's how they are supposed to feel on his nose. Dd's look good.


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