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Eye issue. Anyone BTDT? (small update #47)


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#1 heartlikealion

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Posted 18 May 2017 - 08:28 PM

Dd just started showing signs of an eye issue. I am considering taking her to an ophthalmologist or optometrist (depending on who is available around here). Today happened to be her Early Intervention appointment (she's 2). I brought it up as something that maybe they could look into in addition to the reason we were there (speech) but not sure if they handle that. Basically it's like one eye is not moving the same as the other. I don't know if this is called lazy eye or something else. Maybe cross eyed?

 

The actual evaluation wasn't today, just an intake form was done. They won't meet with her for another month and this eye thing is really bothering me so I might not be able to wait that long. Anyway, all they would do I guess is give me a referral from what she said. But I didn't ask if EI covers the fee for that or not. Guess that is my question. If I have to foot the bill either way then I don't think I should wait too long to have it checked out. Dh had asked if I should take her to her regular ped. but we were just there like a month ago for another reason and ultimately I think they will just give me a referral. I don't know if they'd just pick out an eye dr or send me to the children's hospital or what they would do.

 

I plan to take ds to an eye doctor very soon to follow up on his issues and I'm sure that eye dr could also point me in the right direction (she is one of the only optometrists on the COVD website for my state and I have heard good things about her).

 

Anyone had a similar experience? What did you do or would you do?


Edited by heartlikealion, 31 May 2017 - 05:09 PM.


#2 matrips

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Posted 18 May 2017 - 08:56 PM

This got long. Sorry. Ask questions if something's not clear. Writing on my phone here.

My son has strabismus. He's had it since the age of 4. We took him to an Ophthalmologist who was eager to do surgery to fix his crossed eye, and prescribed him glasses for farsightedness. His eye would turn in and the plus lenses would help relax the muscles by enlarging what he was seeing. We cancelled the surgery and kept looking for doctors because the surgery is cosmetic and not guaranteed. Many children need multiple surgeries. I wasn't ready for that.

We finally found one doctor who took a slower approach and she gave him bifocals. He's now 12 and still in bifocals. Yes, his eye still turns without glasses, but I'm curious to see what she says at our next appt. it seems less. He turn is controlled with the glasses.

He started OT in December and from my google reading, it seems there can be a relationship between retained reflexes (which we now know he had), and eye issues such as what he has.

So long story short, find a doctor you're comfortable with and see a couple of you can. Opthamologist looks into eye problems, and most promote surgery for eye turns. Some may patch first. Optometrist for eye vision/glasses. If it's mild, a covd optometrist can maybe do vision therapy. Look into if another issue (line teatined reflexes) can be causing the eye problems. Strabismus is really is a brain issue, not an eye one, as I understand it.
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#3 Tasha

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Posted 18 May 2017 - 09:18 PM

My DD has esotropia, diagnosed when she was not quite 2. If you can see a pediatric ophthalmologist, that would be my recommendation. (We started with an optometrist - who said they saw children -and then they were surprised she couldn't read the eye chart?!) She did end up having surgery when she was 10, and it has lowered her prescription quite a bit.
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#4 heartlikealion

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Posted 18 May 2017 - 09:19 PM

eek surgery sounds so scary.

 

Yeah I think I'd like the slower approach, too, but I didn't know that one of the things they did for kids with this was bifocals. So much to learn.



#5 texasmom33

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Posted 18 May 2017 - 09:29 PM

How is it moving? In or out? I have a child with exotropia. The treatment, appontiments, etc. is all covered under our medical insurance and not vision insurance so that has been helpful.

I noticed it at about 20 months. After a few days of it I called the pedi and went in. She immediately referred us to a Pediatric Opthamologist (MD specializing in strabismus) who got is in the following week. We patched for two years. At first it was the "good" eye we patched. Just 20 minutes a day while child played iPad (doctor's orders! :) ) . Then it went to both eyes- alternating daily. We've not had to patch for about 18 months. Child is able to control it very well so surgery seems unlikely doc says, but we go to the doctor every three months and watch t closely. Oddly it hasn't impacted vision. It mostly shows up when they're tired or ill.

Take pictures if you can- of the eye doing its thing. It's helpful for the doc to see as what's going on doesn't always show up at the appointment if the kid has some conscious control over it. Keep notes on if it happens more at certain points- when they're tired, daydreaming, whatever. All of that is helpful. Take a deep breath. It's concerning but it will be okay. (((Hugs)))

Edited by texasmom33, 18 May 2017 - 09:32 PM.

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#6 SKL

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Posted 18 May 2017 - 09:29 PM

I would see if the COVD doctor can fit her in on the same trip with your son's appointment, and see what they say.

 

My second choice would be a pediatric ophthalmologist.


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#7 solascriptura

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Posted 18 May 2017 - 09:32 PM

My child was diagnosed with strabismus at 11 months.  It was so strange.  All of a sudden her eyes were not tracking the same.  We found a wonderful pediatric opthomalogist and started her on glasses for her farsightedness with a bifocal.  The doctor did not recommend surgery because the glasses were able to correct the problem.  The surgery doesn't fix the vision problem, which causes the turning. Even if  she had the surgery, she would still require glasses for her farsightness.   Her eyes still turn when she doesn't where her glasses, but she is out of her bifocals.  She is at the age where her farsightness is improving as well.  


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#8 heartlikealion

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Posted 18 May 2017 - 09:35 PM

It's one eye going inward, so I guess it's esotropia. I have one picture of it so far, but it looks more mild in that photo than what I've seen in the paste 24 hours. Today during her appointment she screamed at me and her eye did it and the woman said, "oh I see it. Seems like it happens when she's mad" but that might be a coincidence. I don't know if anger triggers it? She isn't always angry when she does it for sure. It's just been happening a lot today. I'm going to call the optometrist tomorrow. We don't have an official appointment with her, but we got a form from her to fill out because I'm investigating something based on another test he took that showed visual motor issues and I was planning on taking ds asap now that school is out.


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#9 texasmom33

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Posted 18 May 2017 - 10:01 PM

It's one eye going inward, so I guess it's esotropia. I have one picture of it so far, but it looks more mild in that photo than what I've seen in the paste 24 hours. Today during her appointment she screamed at me and her eye did it and the woman said, "oh I see it. Seems like it happens when she's mad" but that might be a coincidence. I don't know if anger triggers it? She isn't always angry when she does it for sure. It's just been happening a lot today. I'm going to call the optometrist tomorrow. We don't have an official appointment with her, but we got a form from her to fill out because I'm investigating something based on another test he took that showed visual motor issues and I was planning on taking ds asap now that school is out.

 

Definitely get pics and/or videos on your phone if you can. My child's eye is worst in the car for some reason. I'm not sure why. The doctor can't get it to repeat it in the office. We've even gone outside with the doctor and she's had my child try to look a far distance to replicate it, but it's something about the movement in the car, so Doc's orders to photograph it for her when I'm not the one driving and can safely do so! It was honestly so weird how fast the eyes went from normal to not normal when it first started. It's good you've noticed. The earlier the intervention the better. 


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#10 gardenmom5

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Posted 18 May 2017 - 10:28 PM

it could be lazy eye - you want a developmental ophthalmologist.  I go to a developmental optomitrist, but she'd have to refer out for surgery.   I just want to emphasize - if this is what is going on, do whatever you can to help.   this is a crucial time for vision development.

not all ophthal's are qualified to treat this (I am dead serious about that) . . . but they will try anyway . . . don't bother asking me how I know. or how I know they can screw up a kid's vision for the rest of their life.

 

here's the website for infant see.  http://www.infantsee.org/

 

you should be able to find a dr in your area to which to take your little one.

 

 



#11 heartlikealion

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Posted 18 May 2017 - 10:44 PM

it could be lazy eye - you want a developmental ophthalmologist.  I go to a developmental optomitrist, but she'd have to refer out for surgery.   I just want to emphasize - if this is what is going on, do whatever you can to help.   this is a crucial time for vision development.

not all ophthal's are qualified to treat this (I am dead serious about that) . . . but they will try anyway . . . don't bother asking me how I know. or how I know they can screw up a kid's vision for the rest of their life.

 

here's the website for infant see.  http://www.infantsee.org/

 

you should be able to find a dr in your area to which to take your little one.

 

So do you think these choices are better than the COVD site?
 



#12 gardenmom5

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Posted 18 May 2017 - 10:52 PM

So do you think these choices are better than the COVD site?
 

 

you'll probably find there is overlap.


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#13 heartlikealion

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Posted 18 May 2017 - 10:53 PM

you'll probably find there is overlap.

 

No. The COVD match is not on the other site.
 



#14 heartlikealion

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Posted 18 May 2017 - 11:00 PM

But I did bookmark an ophthalmologist from the Infant See site if we need one. Thank you!



#15 scoutingmom

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Posted 18 May 2017 - 11:17 PM

I had this as a child, and 2 of my kids (one very mild. The other not so mild). The younger one is also extremely far sighted and been in glasses since about 20 months old. Paediatric opthamologist. If you have to get a young one glasses, get Myraflex frames! They are almost indestructable!

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#16 Upptacka

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Posted 18 May 2017 - 11:48 PM

I would start with an ophthalmologist, not an optometrist for this concern.

If you are noticing the eyes aren't "straight" it *could* be strabismus, which can be an eye muscle issue. In some cases (generally constant strabismus which can't be corrected with lenses), surgery is recommended to correct the muscles. The eye has muscles on each side, and if one is too long or too short, it can align differently than the other eye. Strabismus is important to address, because it can lead to double vision and/or amblyopia, aka "lazy eye" -- particularly if it is always the same eye turning in or out. Amblyopia is more of a brain issue. Basically the brain begins to "ignore" or suppress the image in the weaker eye (or the eye that is giving the brain a conflicting image because it isn't focused straight). Strabismus and amblyopia are different things, but they often coexist.

Strabismus is commonly due to a refractive error, typically being farsighted in one or both eyes. The resulting "eye turning in" is called Accommodative esotropia. If the eye is very farsighted (farsightedness typically increases in early childhood), it can appear crossed when trying to focus. The crossing can be corrected with glasses and/or patching to strengthen the weak eye (if there is a weak eye), to prevent amblyopia.

You really need a thorough evaluation with an ophthalmologist (pediatric ophthalmologist if you have them in your area), to determine if the eyes are straight, and if not, why. They can determine if it is a refractive issue, a convergence issue, or a muscle issue. Or a combination of. Her eyes will need to be dilated, so expect a lengthy appointment.

For what it's worth, none of the ophthalmologists I worked for would ever recommend strabismus surgery for anything other than a muscle issue unable to be corrected with lenses. In other words, a refractive issue didn't exist, glasses (or anything else) would not help the alignment, etc. Also, strabismus surgery is not merely cosmetic. Even adults having the surgery (at this point it is too late to correct any amblyopia) benefit from improved depth perception and stereopsis. Their visual acuity (reading letters on the eye chart) doesn't improve, but having both eyes aligned can make a big difference in basic daily functioning (try flossing your teeth, opening a car door, cooking, etc with one eye closed). But in the vast majority of cases, the strabismus was a refractive issue to begin with, which was resolved with glasses and possibly patching.

I would bring her in sooner rather than later; the longer you give the eyes the opportunity to suppress, the more difficult it is to achieve "normal" binocular vision.

Edited by Upptacka, 19 May 2017 - 09:38 AM.

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#17 gardenmom5

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Posted 18 May 2017 - 11:51 PM

No. The COVD match is not on the other site.
 

 

i've looked up local drs - and some are on both sites.

 

if she's going to need surgery - you do need a developmental ophthalmologist


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#18 Upptacka

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Posted 19 May 2017 - 12:00 AM

Oh, I will also add that an eye exam with an ophthalmologist (MD) is usually covered by health insurance. You can check with your policy to make sure.
In my area, you pay to see an Optometrist (OD) either out of pocket or via a separate vision coverage plan.

I wouldn't bother seeing the pediatrician for this. They would be able to check and tell you if her eyes are straight or misaligned, but a pediatrician won't be able to tell you why. It sounds like you are noticing enough to be concerned, so I think I would just go for the full eye exam with the MD/ophthalmologist.
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#19 magnificent_baby

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Posted 19 May 2017 - 08:04 AM

it could be lazy eye - you want a developmental ophthalmologist.  I go to a developmental optomitrist, but she'd have to refer out for surgery.   I just want to emphasize - if this is what is going on, do whatever you can to help.   this is a crucial time for vision development.

not all ophthal's are qualified to treat this (I am dead serious about that) . . . but they will try anyway . . . don't bother asking me how I know. or how I know they can screw up a kid's vision for the rest of their life.

 

here's the website for infant see.  http://www.infantsee.org/

 

you should be able to find a dr in your area to which to take your little one.

 

Agree!! Do not wait on this. It could be something totally benign, or at the extreme could lead to permanent damage. I would be on the phone today to get in ASAP.

 

I would go straight to a pediatric specialist, skip the middle man for a referral (if your insurance allows), unless it's just a phone call to the pede for a recommendation.


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#20 heartlikealion

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Posted 19 May 2017 - 08:04 AM

Oh, I will also add that an eye exam with an ophthalmologist (MD) is usually covered by health insurance. You can check with your policy to make sure.
In my area, you pay to see an Optometrist (OD) either out of pocket or via a separate vision coverage plan.

I wouldn't bother seeing the pediatrician for this. They would be able to check and tell you if her eyes are straight or misaligned, but a pediatrician won't be able to tell you why. It sounds like you are noticing enough to be concerned, so I think I would just go for the full eye exam with the MD/ophthalmologist.

 

Dh made this same point to me last night. I think I'll just call the ophthalmologist from the Infant See site and go from there. He had a very impressive write up about him on the site.
 


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#21 heartlikealion

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Posted 19 May 2017 - 08:06 AM

Agree!! Do not wait on this. It could be something totally benign, or at the extreme could lead to permanent damage. I would be on the phone today to get in ASAP.

 

I would go straight to a pediatric specialist, skip the middle man for a referral (if your insurance allows), unless it's just a phone call to the pede for a recommendation.

 

I agree. We posted at the same time :)
 


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#22 SKL

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Posted 19 May 2017 - 08:10 AM

I did go to an ophthalmologist first, but I actually wish I didn't.  Ours had a "wait and see" attitude - was prepared to wait until school age to see if the problem fixed itself.  I don't know that he would have done that with your specific issue, but I figured it couldn't hurt to let the COVD doc take a look before the ophthalmologist, since you are going there anyway.  I do realize that there are some conditions an optometrist cannot fix.  Same is true the other way around.


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#23 heartlikealion

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Posted 19 May 2017 - 08:12 AM

Their number is disconnected :crying:

 

I'll see if I can find more info. Hope they are still open.



#24 Jaybee

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Posted 19 May 2017 - 08:21 AM

I had this, and started wearing glasses at 2. Ds had this, and started wearing glasses at 13 months--about a week after we realized his eyes were turning in when he tried to focus up close. Both of us went to ophthalmologists, ds to a pediatric ophthalmologist. Neither pushed surgery, though it was a possibility for me. Glasses held the eyes straight for both of us. I liked taking him to an MD because I didn't want anything to be missed; if the doctor had suggested surgery right off or anything that invasive, we would have probably looked at second opinions, etc. But I would get her checked out asap, as the sooner she gets those glasses on, the less likely she will be to start favoring one eye and therefore weakening the other.

 

ETA: Our crossing eyes were caused by farsightedness.


Edited by Jaybee, 19 May 2017 - 08:25 AM.

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#25 heartlikealion

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Posted 19 May 2017 - 09:25 AM

Ok I've called a few places and all dead ends.

 

The Infant See guy was actually an optometrist that worked with an ophthalmologist. Found the ophthalmologist through another number but he doesn't see children.

From there it went like this:

Place A won't see her til August.

Place B won't see her til August and requires a referral. They said with referral they might be able to warrant moving the date up.

Place C doesn't see anyone under 5 (was going to go there for referral)

Place with the COVD dr I want to see is closed today.

 

It's looking like I might have to take her to the pediatrician to get that referral and even then no guarantee of an appointment quickly. One place said that might mean you see a dr within a few weeks (that sounds like a long wait to me in this case).

 

ETA: phew. Okay I found someone that will see her Tuesday and then refer her out if necessary. The place seeing her Tues. is an optometrist but they were on the InfantSee site.


Edited by heartlikealion, 19 May 2017 - 09:36 AM.

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#26 texasmom33

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Posted 19 May 2017 - 09:33 AM

Ok I've called a few places and all dead ends.

The Infant See guy was actually an optometrist that worked with an ophthalmologist. Found the ophthalmologist through another number but he doesn't see children.
From there it went like this:
Place A won't see her til August.
Place B won't see her til August and requires a referral. They said with referral they might be able to warrant moving the date up.
Place C doesn't see anyone under 5 (was going to go there for referral)
Place with the COVD dr I want to see is closed today.

It's looking like I might have to take her to the pediatrician to get that referral and even then no guarantee of an appointment quickly. One place said that might mean you see a dr within a few weeks (that sounds like a long wait to me in this case).


The pedi referral might help you get in and be taken seriously. There aren't a ton of pediatric opthamologist around specializing in it and that's even with me living within driving distance to a huge medical center, so there can be waits. I know a few weeks seems like a long time, but it's not something that will cause permanent damage in that short of a time. In the meantime you might also go on your insurance website and see who specializing in this is in network even if you have to drive a bit, if you want in sooner.
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#27 scholastica

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Posted 19 May 2017 - 09:34 AM

She's young. It's ok if they can't see her until August. Find the best pediatric ophthalmologist you can and wait. I've had 4 kids with varying degrees of strabismus. We've had everything from outgrowing it completely to surgery. My youngest hopped in the chair after her siblings one day at the doctor's office at 18 months of age. He did a cursory exam and said bring her back in six months she's already far-sighted. So, even at that point, there was no need to rush to put her in glasses or anything.

You can always ask to be put on the cancellation list. A good pediatric ophthalmologist will be booked way out. They are worth their weight in gold.
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#28 heartlikealion

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Posted 19 May 2017 - 09:39 AM

Sorry I didn't see your replies. I just edited that post. We got her in to an optometrist for an evaluation on Tuesday now. They were on the InfantSee site and said that given that she's having problems it might even be covered by insurance despite them being an optometrist. I don't have high hopes of that but it's nice she said it's possible. From there we'll have our referral if we need it.

 

I'm scheduled in August with one of the pediatric ophthalmologists (ironically the one that doesn't require a referral). But maybe with a referrral I can get bumped up sooner at one of the two pediatric ophthalmologists. Ugh I hope it wasn't stupid to make this appt. but I don't want to sit on my hands til August doing nothing, either.



#29 scholastica

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Posted 19 May 2017 - 09:43 AM

Sorry I didn't see your replies. I just edited that post. We got her in to an optometrist for an evaluation on Tuesday now. They were on the InfantSee site and said that given that she's having problems it might even be covered by insurance despite them being an optometrist. I don't have high hopes of that but it's nice she said it's possible. From there we'll have our referral if we need it.

 

I'm scheduled in August with one of the pediatric ophthalmologists (ironically the one that doesn't require a referral). But maybe with a referrral I can get bumped up sooner at one of the two pediatric ophthalmologists. Ugh I hope it wasn't stupid to make this appt. but I don't want to sit on my hands til August doing nothing, either.

 

You aren't stupid to make the appointment. You may get a better idea of what you're dealing with and they may have pull with the ophthalmologist's office and get you in sooner. Good luck. FWIW, an optometrist caught my first child's strabismus and sent us on to an ophthalmologist.

 

ETA: Ask your pediatrician who the best ophthalmologist is, or better yet, who would they take their kids to? I live in a major metro area with multiple medical systems, two medical schools and two children's hospitals. I can count three ophthalmologists I would trust with my kids eyes.


Edited by scholastica, 19 May 2017 - 09:47 AM.

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#30 Upptacka

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Posted 19 May 2017 - 09:46 AM

I think it is good you are being proactive. Seeing the optometrist won't be a wasted appointment. He should be able to measure her refractive error and prescribe glasses if she is significantly farsighted. And then you can follow up with the ophthalmologist in August.
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#31 SKL

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Posted 19 May 2017 - 11:04 AM

I'm glad you have somewhat of a plan for the next step.  I hope you get the help you need soon.

 

On a lighter note, this reminds me of my daughter's first visit to the pediatric ophth.  (Optometrists I called didn't see kids under 5, and I didn't know about COVD stuff then.)  They gave her a vision test using pictures, since the assumption is that a 2yo doesn't know all the letters.  Well, the first great big picture was of a "telephone" - which looked similar to the1929 phone on this page (scroll down a bit):

 

https://materialdesi...ne-of-plastics/

 

My 2yo is like, ummm.... 


Edited by SKL, 19 May 2017 - 11:06 AM.


#32 heartlikealion

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Posted 19 May 2017 - 11:18 AM

I'm glad you have somewhat of a plan for the next step.  I hope you get the help you need soon.

 

On a lighter note, this reminds me of my daughter's first visit to the pediatric ophth.  (Optometrists I called didn't see kids under 5, and I didn't know about COVD stuff then.)  They gave her a vision test using pictures, since the assumption is that a 2yo doesn't know all the letters.  Well, the first great big picture was of a "telephone" - which looked similar to the1929 phone on this page (scroll down a bit):

 

https://materialdesi...ne-of-plastics/

 

My 2yo is like, ummm.... 

 

:laugh:

 

She had a play enclosure with a rotary phone once. The rotary dial thing was on the wall of the playpen. Ds thought it was a safe. We jokingly referred to the play area as a jail cell and you get a phone call home lol.
 



#33 solascriptura

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Posted 19 May 2017 - 12:45 PM

Yes, please see a pediatric opthamalogist with a lot of experience.  You won't regret it.  This isn't just a vision issue anymore.  Once the eye starts to turn there is a problem much deeper.  I'm so thankful that I took my child in immediately.  



#34 Upptacka

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Posted 19 May 2017 - 01:19 PM

I'm glad you have somewhat of a plan for the next step. I hope you get the help you need soon.

On a lighter note, this reminds me of my daughter's first visit to the pediatric ophth. (Optometrists I called didn't see kids under 5, and I didn't know about COVD stuff then.) They gave her a vision test using pictures, since the assumption is that a 2yo doesn't know all the letters. Well, the first great big picture was of a "telephone" - which looked similar to the1929 phone on this page (scroll down a bit):

https://materialdesi...ne-of-plastics/

My 2yo is like, ummm....

LOL!

Most of the eye charts in the office I worked at used those charts, too.

I would say 50% of the kids would just give me a blank stare (understandably), 40% would call it a house, and the other 10% would give a random answer. We never put any weight into their responses for that image!

Edited by Upptacka, 19 May 2017 - 01:19 PM.


#35 SKL

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Posted 19 May 2017 - 01:51 PM

This link has the actual pre-literate eye chart that was used for my kid (scroll down a little).  Might be a good idea to tell your little one what these are called in advance of the appointment.  :)  Though, it seems there are other pre-literate charts too ....

 

http://www.parentofa...years-9-months/



#36 solascriptura

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Posted 19 May 2017 - 02:01 PM

Ok I've called a few places and all dead ends.

 

The Infant See guy was actually an optometrist that worked with an ophthalmologist. Found the ophthalmologist through another number but he doesn't see children.

From there it went like this:

Place A won't see her til August.

Place B won't see her til August and requires a referral. They said with referral they might be able to warrant moving the date up.

Place C doesn't see anyone under 5 (was going to go there for referral)

Place with the COVD dr I want to see is closed today.

 

It's looking like I might have to take her to the pediatrician to get that referral and even then no guarantee of an appointment quickly. One place said that might mean you see a dr within a few weeks (that sounds like a long wait to me in this case).

 

ETA: phew. Okay I found someone that will see her Tuesday and then refer her out if necessary. The place seeing her Tues. is an optometrist but they were on the InfantSee site.

 I have no idea about the InfantSee site, but from what I understand if you need to see an opthamalogist, your insurance might require a referral or not.  We have a PPO so didn't need a referral.  I really don't understand how a doctor would tell you to wait until a child was 5.  Their bodies and brains are developing, so it's necessary to see them quickly.  A few weeks is okay, but a few months is not.  



#37 Jan in SC

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Posted 19 May 2017 - 02:26 PM

I would go straight to the ped. There are other reasons that kid's eyes don't track correctly. The ped can quickly determine if she needs an ophthalmologist or possibly a neurologist. It would be rare to need the neurologist, but the ped could get you in with the right person much faster. I wouldn't even consider an optometrist.

#38 heartlikealion

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Posted 19 May 2017 - 03:03 PM

I would go straight to the ped. There are other reasons that kid's eyes don't track correctly. The ped can quickly determine if she needs an ophthalmologist or possibly a neurologist. It would be rare to need the neurologist, but the ped could get you in with the right person much faster. I wouldn't even consider an optometrist.

 

But I'm not sure the ped. would be better at determining which doctor to send the child to? My guess is she'd say start with the ophthalmologist (or some eye dr) and then go from there. But that's just my guess.

 

The place that wants a referral said they would accept a referral from any medical person including an optometrist. I specifically asked. The other place that put me down for an appt. does not require a referral at all (but maybe I could push for an earlier appt. if I had the optometrist's opinion).
 



#39 scoutingmom

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Posted 19 May 2017 - 03:41 PM

When my child was referred, I had to wait a couple of months (3 or so?) for the opthamologist to call (there was only one in the province that took kids that young). They called about February with an appointment date in..... December. Fortunately her older sibling had an appointment in early March. While there I asked if we could get in earlier because of the severity of the problem and her age.... then I asked if we could get on their cancellation list (people to call to fill in cancelled appointments). As we finished up my son's appointment they asked if we could come Monday at 8am. So we got in after about 3 or so months rather than over a year. (It took a while to get the glasses made, they had to send them back)

Honestly, August doesn't sound that bad... but maybe ask to be on the cancellation list if you are close enough...

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#40 SKL

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Posted 19 May 2017 - 03:42 PM

You might be able to get a referral by calling your insurance's nurse help line, without going to the pediatrician.

 

I am not sure a pediatrician knows enough to send you to the right person on the first try.  I haven't had great experiences in that regard.

 

The only reason I thought of taking my kid to a specialist is that eye problems run in my family.  Surgeries, patches, medicines, glasses, we've done it all.



#41 matrips

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Posted 19 May 2017 - 04:01 PM

A week or a month or so isn't huge; you're still acting quickly on it. I responded before, but I really wish someone had told me and retained reflexes affecting eye control and brain/eye coordination (my kid could have really used OT back then for it but I didn't know about it). We're always told by opthamologist that strabismus/esotropia is an eye muscle issue. However, if it were, then once surgery was done, eyes should team up and work together. Often they don't. It fixes it cosmetically, for a time.

Optometrists that do vision therapy often require OT for retained reflexes before VT starts. (Well, the good ones do.) They know the link exists. VT can't be as successful without the brain and body working right.

Anyway, I'll stop here. It probably sounds all hogwashy! And maybe it is. But since I regret not knowing 8 years ago, I wanted to at least do an FYI about it for you. Take it as you will and I hope all goes well with your little one. :)

#42 Jan in SC

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Posted 19 May 2017 - 04:34 PM

But I'm not sure the ped. would be better at determining which doctor to send the child to? My guess is she'd say start with the ophthalmologist (or some eye dr) and then go from there. But that's just my guess.

The place that wants a referral said they would accept a referral from any medical person including an optometrist. I specifically asked. The other place that put me down for an appt. does not require a referral at all (but maybe I could push for an earlier appt. if I had the optometrist's opinion).


You're right. I don't know that our ped would definitely know, but I trust him to help decide. If our ped had doubts, he'd probably schedule an appointment with a couple of different specialists that I could cancel if the first one could deal with the problem. I would actually prefer that because if I need the appointment it would be sooner than waiting and making it later. That is just my comfort level though.

#43 gardenmom5

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Posted 19 May 2017 - 06:16 PM

I would go straight to the ped. There are other reasons that kid's eyes don't track correctly. The ped can quickly determine if she needs an ophthalmologist or possibly a neurologist. It would be rare to need the neurologist, but the ped could get you in with the right person much faster. I wouldn't even consider an optometrist.

 

i've btdt, and would never consider a ped.

 

go to a developmental.



#44 heartlikealion

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Posted 20 May 2017 - 01:04 AM

The office surprised me and called me to say they have an opening in June!! :D I took it. Moved up from Aug. to June. We are very relieved. Her eyes are acting weird all.the.time. And now it looks like it's not just the one eye, but both doing it. I am certain they will be able to observe it but I did manage to get a few photos. It was very hard to get her to look at the camera and stay still long enough for get clear pics.

 

I don't think anyone was suggesting we wait til age 5, but just that some of the drs don't see patients under that age. One specifically said "age 5" and another said "first grade" then elaborated that the child will know their colors and letters.

 

I pulled up one chart earlier today and was going over the pictures with dd (phone, duck, hand). I'll try to pull up some more charts later.


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#45 christusg01

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Posted 20 May 2017 - 04:45 AM

I began noticing something slightly off with my daughters eyes when she had just turned 3 years old (she's now 10). One eye would "wander" off to the side. I took her to the ped first, who referred me to a pediatric ophthalmologist at the local children's hospital. Turns out she had strabismus and a very large astigmatism, as well as being nearsighted. Poor kid had probably been seeing everything fuzzy! The doctor said I was very observant because I caught the strabismus very early. They fitted her for glasses and also began patching. We patched over a year. But in the end, the glasses and patching did not keep her eye straight, so we moved on to surgery before there was a chance of eye damage. The surgery was very quick and easy, and the recovery was about a day. So far, 5 years later, her eyes remain straight. It's not guaranteed that she won't need surgery again one day, but her eyes have been doing well. At her last ophthalmologist appointment this past January, the doctor said her eyes did wander slightly for just a sec, but said it was nothing of concern yet....and may never be. She does still have a pretty large eye prescription due to the astigmatism, so she will always wear glasses.

#46 scholastica

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Posted 20 May 2017 - 09:42 AM

The office surprised me and called me to say they have an opening in June!! :D I took it. Moved up from Aug. to June. We are very relieved. Her eyes are acting weird all.the.time. And now it looks like it's not just the one eye, but both doing it. I am certain they will be able to observe it but I did manage to get a few photos. It was very hard to get her to look at the camera and stay still long enough for get clear pics.

I don't think anyone was suggesting we wait til age 5, but just that some of the drs don't see patients under that age. One specifically said "age 5" and another said "first grade" then elaborated that the child will know their colors and letters.

I pulled up one chart earlier today and was going over the pictures with dd (phone, duck, hand). I'll try to pull up some more charts later.


Great news!!
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#47 heartlikealion

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Posted 31 May 2017 - 05:14 PM

She saw an optometrist today. Was supposed to go sooner, but was sick the day of her original appt. Anyway, I honestly don't know if they did much. They looked at her with some lights and lenses and did their best to get a prescription but she was very wiggly, not cooperating, moving her whole head rather than just the eyes, etc. It was kinda a nightmare for me and I suggested more than once that we ask for a third person to come in the room with us. I didn't want to just sit there and struggle. Also, I was worried dd was going to kick the very pregnant dr. who I'm not even sure was a dr. She didn't use "dr" to introduce herself and was not the person I had been scheduled to see. She tried to dilate dd's eyes but dd wasn't cooperative about that either and she said it was good enough but that the ophthalmologist would have a stronger solution and more equipment probably. He could probably give us better results. She said from what she did observe she does not believe it's a neurological problem. She thinks dd is far sighted and will need glasses but since her other appt. is in June it's okay to wait to get a clearer idea about prescription. Her eyes practically lit up when I told her the ophthalmologist. She said she refers out to him and that I probably had to wait months. She was surprised I got an appointment soon and I said yes it must have been a cancellation because I got bumped up. She's going to forward her notes over to him so he will have them before we go. She probably is a doctor and they just have more than one there.


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#48 nixpix5

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Posted 31 May 2017 - 06:13 PM

One of my son's has deep set eyes so while one looked a little out of alignment I never thought much of it and his pediatrician didn't catch it. In Kindergarten a nurse caught it. One eye was turning in more and I took him in. He ended up having strabismus with amblyopia. It went untreated so he lost most of the sight in his left eye and we didn't know it. His eyeball is fine it is at the level or the brain...he is cortically blind. So they fit him with glasses (even though it won't help that eye) and we started patching. We signed him up for vision therapy and it is doing a lot better now. Every month he gets a little better. Poor kiddo has no depth perception so they are trying to help him gain some and recover sight.

#49 umsami

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Posted 31 May 2017 - 07:14 PM

Go to a pediatric ophthalmologist.  That is who will fix amblyopia or strabismus.  Most know enough about neuro-ophthalmology to determine if that is the cause.

 

An optometrist will just refer you to a pediatric ophthalmologist anyways.

 

(I had surgery for both when I was three.  Back then, it was an overnight procedure....these days, it's out patient.  You will still likely do patching exercises and such. )


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#50 texasmom33

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Posted 31 May 2017 - 07:22 PM

If she struggled like that at this appointment, is there anyway you can take your husband with you for her June appointment? We've been doing this for years, but I still have to take dh to the one appointment per year where they dialate ds's eyes. It takes three of us- someone holding him, one his head, and one his eyelids, for them to be able to get the spray in. He's five and knows what is coming every May. We go every three months and have no issues the other appointments but the dilation thing is never fun for them. It burns and is uncomfortable and I don't blame them for hating it.

Sorry you didn't get much out of today, I think your June appointment will give you the info you need to take a breath. Hang in there! And thanks for the update!