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Vent: Food budget and just.one.single.boy


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#1 WendyAndMilo

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Posted 18 May 2017 - 08:14 PM

I know, I know - welcome to the real world.

 

I just spent $150 at Costco on food that will feed DS for about a week and a half. He's only 10 and there's only one of him!!  How is this possible?!  He eats about 5 full meals a day and is slim; he also gets quite hangry/tearful when I suggest that he not eat.  For the past 6 years, my food budget has been $200 month for the two of us and all the animals.  I am seriously considering upping my work hours - in addition to overloading my college courses for the next semester/homeschooling/remodeling/volunteering - just so I can feed him not crap.  I want to cry.

 

 


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#2 maize

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Posted 18 May 2017 - 08:22 PM

Will he/can he eat peanut butter sandwiches?

Hard boiled eggs kept in the fridge?

Rice and beans?

Baked potatoes (can be done in the microwave)?

Cook a whole chicken and parcel out the meat in snack and/or meal size batches.

There are filling options that are neither expensive not nutritionally worthless.

$200 for the month for two people plus pets is not much though, I do think you need to plan for more than that. If the budget is super tight can you cut anything else? Do you qualify for food stamps or other assistance?

Edited by maize, 18 May 2017 - 09:23 PM.

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#3 Melissa in Australia

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Posted 18 May 2017 - 08:23 PM

porridge for breakfast keeps them full longer

 

popcorn is cheep and a good filler between meals. 

 

 

I have found that the big intake of food happens just before the growth spurt, by around 15 they slow down  and by 20 are back to eating ordinary amounts.


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#4 Melissa in Australia

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Posted 18 May 2017 - 08:26 PM

left over rice, milk and a dash of honey is also a good filler between meals. When I was a child we had it for desert. 



#5 WendyAndMilo

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Posted 18 May 2017 - 08:29 PM

Will he/can he eat peanut butter sandwitches?

Hard boiled eggs kept in the fridge?

Rice and beans?

Baked potatoes (can be done in the microwave)?

Cook a whole chicken and parcel out the meat in snack and/or meal size batches.

There are filling options that are neither expensive not nutritionally worthless.

$200 for the month for two people plus pets is not much though, I do think you need to plan for more than that. If the budget is super tight can you cut anything else? Do you qualify for food stamps or other assistance?

No to the first four.  Well, PB & J sandwiches aren't his favorite but I could try those again.  He's been extraordinarily picky as far as what he'll eat and is only now starting to branch out - last week, he tried tacos for the very first time.  Now, it was only taco meat and a hard shell, but he ate them together as they are supposed to be eaten so I was pretty excited.  I will try a whole chicken - that's a good idea.

 

porridge for breakfast keeps them full longer

 

popcorn is cheep and a good filler between meals. 

 

 

I have found that the big intake of food happens just before the growth spurt, by around 15 they slow down  and by 20 are back to eating ordinary amounts.

You're right, I should start working on his breakfasts! 

Ugh, another five years of this! :)



#6 JulieA97

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Posted 18 May 2017 - 08:43 PM

My son is 6 and an only child. He eats more than myself and dh put together. I can not keep that child filled! Next week he starts swim team so prayers appreciated for our grocery bill ;)

I am following for ideas and solidarity:)
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#7 Artichoke

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Posted 18 May 2017 - 08:48 PM

Are deviled eggs an option?   When we had three teen boys most dinners had deviled eggs and some sort of tomato or veggie soup as a starter.  It helped to curb their appetites before the main dish. We also severely limited the amount of cold cereal in the house.  Cereal and milk is expensive and usually doesn't fill them up.  During the winter, we would have some sort of bean meal for lunch everyday --  refried bean wraps, black beans and rice, bean soup and cornbread, etc.  It kept them full and kept the grocery bill lower.  We also had cut up veggies the side. 

 

ETA:  Does your ds need more water each day?   Sometimes thirst causes hunger signal.   When the kids were little we would always give them water before a snack when they would say they were hungry.  Usually the water would do the trick.  We had three meals a day plus two snacks and sometimes a bed time snack. When they became teens they got water themselves when they felt hungry.  


Edited by Artichoke, 18 May 2017 - 08:52 PM.

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#8 J-rap

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Posted 18 May 2017 - 08:51 PM

Our secret was beans!  We had legumes all the time.  I'd cook black beans in our slow cooker, a big pot of them, and put them in the fridge.  My ds could heat it up for soup, or to pour over rice, or to have in burritos.  Honestly, this type of eating served him well for years when he was a young adult and living on a shoestring.  :)


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#9 WendyAndMilo

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Posted 18 May 2017 - 08:59 PM

Unfortunately, DS does not like beans or eggs.

He drinks about 2 liters of water a day; should he be drinking more??



#10 Ausmumof3

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Posted 18 May 2017 - 09:11 PM

2L is right for water intake unless he's doing heavy exercise.

I feel your pain... Cost of food here is crazy and my growing skills are limited. If I had to grow all our food we'd starve.

Chicken drumsticks are cheap here and they tend to help keep my kids full - I guess it's the protein content. I'm finding at this stage that a bit more effort at lunch time to make a good filling meal helps reduce the snacking which is far more expensive long term. I tend to be a toasted cheese for lunch girl so it's a pain but worth it long term.
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#11 Ausmumof3

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Posted 18 May 2017 - 09:13 PM

left over rice, milk and a dash of honey is also a good filler between meals. When I was a child we had it for desert.


Us too and it's one of my ds favourite snacks.

It's also cheap and easy to make a big batch of creamed rice if they like that.
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#12 cjzimmer1

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Posted 18 May 2017 - 09:19 PM

No to the first four.  Well, PB & J sandwiches aren't his favorite but I could try those again.  He's been extraordinarily picky as far as what he'll eat and is only now starting to branch out - last week, he tried tacos for the very first time.  Now, it was only taco meat and a hard shell, but he ate them together as they are supposed to be eaten so I was pretty excited.  I will try a whole chicken - that's a good idea.

 

You're right, I should start working on his breakfasts! 

Ugh, another five years of this! :)

I know some kids have sensory issues and that's a completely different issue but I don't cater to picky kids.  My eldest hates mushroom with a passion.  But when he came and told me he would eat the entire bowl of mushroom rissoto (and did) because he was hungry, I knew that it was true hunger.  On the other hand most of my kids tell me they are "hungry" but when I offer them choices of basic foods (like oatmeal, veggies, fruit) suddenly there are not hungry any more.  So I serve a regular portion of a food that is somewhat acceptable to them and if they are still hungry then it's the basic foods, there is never seconds on meat (but they can have all the beans and lentils they want).  I can't afford to cater to picky so if they are truly hungry they will need to eat less 'desirable" (in their minds at least) choices or live with the hunger.  They really don't starve themselves but it has helped all of them learn that despite the fact that their mom is a very good cook, they don't get to eat gourmet food all the time.

 

But lots of oatmeal, rice, beans, potatoes, sweet potatoes, and whatever cheap fruit I can lay my hands on are the staples around here.

 

Also, if they have to prepare it themselves, that often reduces their desire to eat more food.  Several of my kids are adverse to fixing their own foods.  I have one who won't even wash his own apple.  So often times if I tell them they have to dish up, heat up, or cut up their own food, they lose interest really fast.


Edited by cjzimmer1, 18 May 2017 - 09:23 PM.

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#13 Melissa in Australia

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Posted 18 May 2017 - 09:25 PM

I don't do fussy eaters either. 


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#14 Tanaqui

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Posted 18 May 2017 - 09:27 PM

It's a rough age. *hugs*


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#15 frogger

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Posted 18 May 2017 - 09:43 PM

Oatmeal just gets my boys metabolism going and they are hungry within 20 minutes. It can help but only paired with protein.

The cheapest source of calories by far is peanut butter. I've never seen anything close to it. I did the math. 56 servings per container and 180 calories per container so 10,800 calories for a $5-$6 4 lb. container of peanut butter.
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#16 Artichoke

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Posted 18 May 2017 - 09:45 PM

I know some kids have sensory issues and that's a completely different issue but I don't cater to picky kids.  My eldest hates mushroom with a passion.  But when he came and told me he would eat the entire bowl of mushroom rissoto (and did) because he was hungry, I knew that it was true hunger.  On the other hand most of my kids tell me they are "hungry" but when I offer them choices of basic foods (like oatmeal, veggies, fruit) suddenly there are not hungry any more.  So I serve a regular portion of a food that is somewhat acceptable to them and if they are still hungry then it's the basic foods, there is never seconds on meat (but they can have all the beans and lentils they want).  I can't afford to cater to picky so if they are truly hungry they will need to eat less 'desirable" (in their minds at least) choices or live with the hunger.  They really don't starve themselves but it has helped all of them learn that despite the fact that their mom is a very good cook, they don't get to eat gourmet food all the time.

 

But lots of oatmeal, rice, beans, potatoes, sweet potatoes, and whatever cheap fruit I can lay my hands on are the staples around here.

 

Also, if they have to prepare it themselves, that often reduces their desire to eat more food.  Several of my kids are adverse to fixing their own foods.  I have one who won't even wash his own apple.  So often times if I tell them they have to dish up, heat up, or cut up their own food, they lose interest really fast.

 

 

I think there's some wisdom here.   We had to work with our kiddos on the distinction between "not liking" and "not a favorite."   My children have a few things they truly don't like, and I choose to honor this when cooking.   Most other foods they like, but some aren't favorites.   One example was that eldest ds didn't like crusts on his bread.  When he began to fix his own lunches, he began to eat the crusts since they were too much trouble to cut off.  Another ds refused to eat  peanut butter.  He moved out on his own and suddenly discovered peanut butter since it was inexpensive and easy.  As the pp said, requiring the child to fix the snack almost always slowed down the eating.  


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#17 Tanaqui

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Posted 18 May 2017 - 10:29 PM

Thinking a little more, WendyandMilo, what will he eat? Maybe we can come up with some very filling options out of his foods.


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#18 winterbaby

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Posted 18 May 2017 - 10:36 PM

Do you use Aldi at all? When I tried them in the past I found the club stores to be cheaper by "would otherwise be spending full price on brand names at the regular grocery store" standards, but not by absolute standards. I just spent $150 at Aldi for enough food to feed two adults and an 11 y.o., all uninhibited big eaters, for about two weeks.

 

I also second PP's suggestion to think in terms of calories per dollar. That seriously saved my butt when I was living on low enough wages to threaten my intake. Going overboard with it would threaten your nutritional balance, but being generally aware of it will show you where it would be most effective to modify some of your choices.


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#19 WendyAndMilo

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Posted 18 May 2017 - 11:02 PM

Do you use Aldi at all? When I tried them in the past I found the club stores to be cheaper by "would otherwise be spending full price on brand names at the regular grocery store" standards, but not by absolute standards. I just spent $150 at Aldi for enough food to feed two adults and an 11 y.o., all uninhibited big eaters, for about two weeks.

 

I also second PP's suggestion to think in terms of calories per dollar. That seriously saved my butt when I was living on low enough wages to threaten my intake. Going overboard with it would threaten your nutritional balance, but being generally aware of it will show you where it would be most effective to modify some of your choices.

I don't have an Aldi.  I do have a WinCo (which I think is similar).  The stuff I bought at Costco were things that I know were cheaper by far than even WinCo.

 

Thinking a little more, WendyandMilo, what will he eat? Maybe we can come up with some very filling options out of his foods.

 

Ok....no tomatoes please :leaving: ... since DS was a toddler, he's only been eating either PB&J or ham sandwiches, raw carrots with ranch to dip and crackers.  He absolutely refused to eat anything else, especially no cooked foods and no foods that would roll around and touch.  I've been working on him lately and we've added the following:

Chicken strips/nuggets

"Salad" (only lettuce and ranch)

Corn

Blueberries

Strawberries

Tortellini

Olives

Spanish Rice

Bacon

Pancakes

Pasta with no sauce or toppings, just butter

"Pizza" with no red sauce or cheese, just aioli and olives

Quesadillas with only cheese (nothing that would make it lumpy)

ETA: we've also expanded his lunch meat selection to include roast beef and turkey

 

Very occasionally, he will have grilled cheese and apples.  He still doesn't like cooked foods where there are multiple ingredients, like lasagna, soup, etc.

 

Those are the things that come to mind looking through our cabinet...


Edited by WendyAndMilo, 18 May 2017 - 11:05 PM.

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#20 Shellydon

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Posted 18 May 2017 - 11:12 PM

I don't have an Aldi.  I do have a WinCo (which I think is similar).  The stuff I bought at Costco were things that I know were cheaper by far than even WinCo.

 

 

Ok....no tomatoes please :leaving: ... since DS was a toddler, he's only been eating either PB&J or ham sandwiches, raw carrots with ranch to dip and crackers.  He absolutely refused to eat anything else, especially no cooked foods and no foods that would roll around and touch.  I've been working on him lately and we've added the following:

Chicken strips/nuggets

"Salad" (only lettuce and ranch)

Corn

Blueberries

Strawberries

Tortellini

Olives

Spanish Rice

Bacon

Pancakes

Pasta with no sauce or toppings, just butter

"Pizza" with no red sauce or cheese, just aioli and olives

Quesadillas with only cheese (nothing that would make it lumpy)

ETA: we've also expanded his lunch meat selection to include roast beef and turkey

 

Very occasionally, he will have grilled cheese and apples.  He still doesn't like cooked foods where there are multiple ingredients, like lasagna, soup, etc.

 

Those are the things that come to mind looking through our cabinet...

 

This is really restrictive.  I would work doubly hard on increasing his variety of foods.  If he is just 'picky', then required one bite of a new food every day for a week will help.  E.g., cook beans and require one spoonful each day for a week.  The following week pick something else and repeat.  It can take up to 15 introductions of a food before a kid decides it is okay. 
 


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#21 katilac

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Posted 18 May 2017 - 11:32 PM

 

Ok....no tomatoes please :leaving: ... since DS was a toddler, he's only been eating either PB&J or ham sandwiches, raw carrots with ranch to dip and crackers.  He absolutely refused to eat anything else, especially no cooked foods and no foods that would roll around and touch.  I've been working on him lately and we've added the following:

Chicken strips/nuggets

"Salad" (only lettuce and ranch)

Corn

Blueberries

Strawberries

Tortellini

Olives

Spanish Rice

Bacon

Pancakes

Pasta with no sauce or toppings, just butter

"Pizza" with no red sauce or cheese, just aioli and olives

Quesadillas with only cheese (nothing that would make it lumpy)

ETA: we've also expanded his lunch meat selection to include roast beef and turkey

 

Very occasionally, he will have grilled cheese and apples.  He still doesn't like cooked foods where there are multiple ingredients, like lasagna, soup, etc.

 

Those are the things that come to mind looking through our cabinet...

 

That's some pretty serious food restriction! And he likes expensive stuff, lol. Are there sensory issues in general? I don't know much about it, but I do know there are OTs who will work with kids to expand their range of eating. 

 

Looking at your list, I have a couple of short-term thoughts.

 

For pasta, you can buy the type with added protein if you don't do so already. The taste and texture are the same as regular, imo, unlike whole wheat pasta. It is more expensive, but the added protein might curb hunger. They also have the veggies added kind, which I also find doesn't alter texture or taste, but it does change the coloring, which will be obvious with only butter on it. 

 

My kids also love pancakes, so much so that I try to make them a tad bit healthier, but still like traditional pancakes. Instead of 1/3 cup oil, I use one of those small servings of apple sauce, and just a dash of oil (remember there's fat in the egg and milk as well). Flour is 3 parts white, one part wheat Then I add about 2 tablespoons of wheat germ or teff for a tiny boost in nutrition. I have fiddled with my recipe a bit, and these are the changes I found I could make while still having pancakes that were fluffy and delicious. 

 

Oh, I also experimented with adding a bit of whey protein. My kids didn't mind this at all, but I noticed the weird smell, lol. 

 

If he's open to new flavors, you could try stuff like pumpkin or sweet potato puree instead of the apple sauce. This would increase his range and amount of veggies a small amount.


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#22 Melissa in Australia

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Posted 19 May 2017 - 12:14 AM

after looking at your list I have no suggestions at all. I never gave my children choices as a toddler. they ate whatever we ate .

 

if kids are hungry enough they will eat things that they may not "like"


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#23 Tanaqui

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Posted 19 May 2017 - 01:16 AM

I don't know much about it, but I do know there are OTs who will work with kids to expand their range of eating.

 

Yes. Given how restricted his diet is, this is probably covered by insurance. OP, speak to a pediatrician and get a referral to either a speech-language pathologist (yes, that's the job that covers this) or an occupational therapist. You've made some real progress working alone, but given that his appetite is increasing it's not going to do any harm to get professional help.

 


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#24 Diana P.

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Posted 19 May 2017 - 04:00 AM

Unless he has a medical need I'd not focus on the picky eating.

I'd plan out the day with reasons size meals with at least one meal having a bit of a thing he doesn't like. I'd keep more stuff on hand that are designated snacks. if he needs to eat more or he needs a snack, he is permitted to have the beans/eggs/soup/etc. So you aren't telling him to eat less. You have nutritional things for him to eat and if he's really hungry he can eat. It will be hard for him to get used to at first--that's ok.

ETA
I wrote my response based a neurotypical child.

If a special need is involved, consult your provider on a protocol for good introductions, if that isn't covered in regular therapy.

If you can teach him cooking. And at ten, find a way to involve him in the food budget.

Edited by Diana P., 19 May 2017 - 04:05 AM.

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#25 DawnM

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Posted 19 May 2017 - 04:16 AM

I will say first of all that $200 is a very low food budget for even 2 people for a month.

 

Also, Costco tends to have pricier stuff and limited sales.  You honestly might be better off shopping the flyer at the local grocery store, or going to Aldi.

 

In the book, The Tightwad Gazette, Amy talks about what she fed her large family.  They each got 6 ounces of meat at dinner and then a vegetable and a starch.  The starch was unlimited.  So, if they had potatoes, they could have as many potatoes as they wanted,, the rest went into the fridge for snacks.  The same with pasta or rice.  She would make a lot of that and they could go in the fridge and get a bowl of whatever the starch is and heat it up for a snack later.

 

She had no grab type foods.  No chips or bagged snacks.  

 

I don't know if she mentioned popcorn but stovetop popcorn is a very inexpensive snack and my oldest loves it and will make a pot for himself.  

 

 


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#26 IvyInFlorida

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Posted 19 May 2017 - 05:53 AM

I'm trying to come to terms with my grocery budget for my family of four...my almost 8 year old has never been a huge eater (he's lean and very active) but suddenly some metabolic switch has flipped and I can't keep him full.  My almost 3 year old...oy.  He's a giant (45 lbs and grew 2 inches in 3 months) and can inhale a farm's worth of fruit and cheese 4 times a day.  We eat a whole foods diet and wow, things add up. 

 

I don't keep anything ready to eat except a few things that aren't empty calories and I know they won't binge on.  This helps ALL the boys in my house not to go through too much!  I make sure every meal has plenty of protein/fat to keep them full, and I carefully monitor whether things I always buy are cheaper at the regular grocery store or at Sams. 

 

Is there anything blood sugar related going on with your son?  Hangry=low blood sugar? 


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#27 SparklyUnicorn

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Posted 19 May 2017 - 06:08 AM

Oh man yeah.  I've got two boys.  The 11 year old doesn't eat that much.  The 15 year old...it's obscene. 

 

 


Edited by SparklyUnicorn, 19 May 2017 - 06:09 AM.

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#28 JFSinIL

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Posted 19 May 2017 - 06:43 AM

Some folks just need more food (faster metabolism?) plus a growing boy (or girl) will simply need more food. 

Seeing your list makes him look a bit like one of my now grown kids.  I insist he drink a protein drink daily.  I use NOW foods protein powder, a scoop has about  30 grams protein and I mix it with milk for more protein.  I use Dutch Chocolate flavor.  It helps.  

 

I buy Barilla protein pasta, too. Yellow box.  It helps. 


Edited by JFSinIL, 19 May 2017 - 06:44 AM.

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#29 Mergath

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Posted 19 May 2017 - 06:50 AM

With his diet being so restricted, is it possible that he's hungry all the time because he's deficient in certain nutrients? I'd probably take him in and have all his levels checked and if he is super low in anything, try to incorporate new foods high in that vitamin or mineral first.

 

If everything is normal and he doesn't have sensory issues, I'd probably sit him down and be like, "Look kiddo, if you want to eat five meals a day that's fine, but it's going to have to be something cheaper than bacon or blueberries." My dd doesn't have any sensory issues, and while I avoid making the small number of foods she really and truly hates, beyond that she eats what I cook or she's hungry until the next meal.


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#30 maize

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Posted 19 May 2017 - 07:17 AM

Some children are willing to expand their food tolerances for foods that they help prepare. Maybe go to the library and pick out some illustrated cookbooks, or check out online recipes and cooking tutorials. Have him help pick a few recipes to try.

With what he does eat, you can get high protein pancake mixes or simply add extra eggs when you make pancakes to make those more filling; we also eat ours with lots of butter. Protein and fat are more satisying and keep a person full longer than carbs. When it comes to carbs, go for what is inexpensive--potatoes and rice are filling and cheap. For protein, lunch meat and bacon are pricey per ounce; peanut butter, eggs, chicken, roasts on sale, cheese sticks, are all more bang for the buck.

I've told my kids they should have protein, fat, and vegetables at every meal. Maybe you could do a unit study on nutrition and get him interested that way? Anything you can do to get him on board with eating better, meal planning, and grocery budgeting would help.

Edited by maize, 19 May 2017 - 07:18 AM.

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#31 maize

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Posted 19 May 2017 - 07:27 AM

Gardening can also be a great way to get kids interested in eating new foods--it is exciting to eat a carrot or pea or tomato that you grew! We did container gardening when we lived in apartments; I don't know what your living situation is but don't dismiss the possibility if you are short on space. If you have access to a spot with decent sunshine you can grow something. Small scale gardening isn't particularly cost effective but it packs a lot of educational and interest value.

And I agree with others that if the picky eating is not something you can adequately address on your own it may be worth getting feeding therapy. I do think that sensory issues usually underlie extreme pickiness.

Oh, since he will eat peanut butter, you can add that to more foods to increase proteins and fat inexpensively. Try peanut butter on pancakes, peanut butter on apples, etc.

Peanut butter has been a basic survival food for my family. I don't know how folks with peanut allergies get by!

Edited by maize, 19 May 2017 - 07:28 AM.

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#32 Carrie12345

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Posted 19 May 2017 - 07:30 AM

after looking at your list I have no suggestions at all. I never gave my children choices as a toddler. they ate whatever we ate .

 

if kids are hungry enough they will eat things that they may not "like"

 

Having watched a child starve himself for days, I can promise that's not always true.  Now that he's 18, I can say that it improved over time without a childhood (or parenthood) of misery. Or death.  Or removal by CPS.

 

My 18yo's list wasn't quite as restrictive, but close.

My 10yo's list is less restrictive than the one posted *and his brother's.  For him, I do throw in some protein drinks during especially bad weeks.

 

For the given list, I think looking into therapies is a good idea.  


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#33 Amy in NH

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Posted 19 May 2017 - 07:30 AM

Of course he's hungry all the time - he's not eating the protein and fiber he needs to keep him feeling full. I agree with others that he needs to expand his palate whether he can do that with you or professional help.
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#34 maize

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Posted 19 May 2017 - 07:49 AM

if kids are hungry enough they will eat things that they may not "like"


This really is not true for all kids. I tried "eat what is on the table or don't eat" with one of mine--child got so weak from not eating that I had to spoon feed her the next day.

The assumption that a child will eat anything if they are hungry enough just doesn't hold true in all cases.
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#35 SparklyUnicorn

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Posted 19 May 2017 - 08:06 AM

Uh yeah you haven't met my kid.  And really it's heavily frowned upon to starve one's child.  Would have CPS breathing down my neck for sure.

 

 


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#36 mommyoffive

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Posted 19 May 2017 - 08:21 AM

This really is not true for all kids. I tried "eat what is on the table or don't eat" with one of mine--child got so weak from not eating that I had to spoon feed her the next day.

The assumption that a child will eat anything if they are hungry enough just doesn't hold true in all cases.

 

 

I would have to agree with that.  I don't have any kids that have any food issues, but I don't think it can be a rule that applies to everyone without exception.

 

some kids have allergies, sensory issues, are underweight to start with, and may have eating disorders. 

 

 

 

 

Luckily my kids do like the things that are cheap and keep them full.  Eggs, peanut butter, and beans.  As they have gotten older they have become more excepting of things that I make.  I am not sure that is because they are just so hungry as they are growing and active or because they get used to it.  Can you do things like add these items to food he does eat?  You know like Deceptively Delicious?

We add black beans to our pizza.  It is so good.  

 

Or just try other ways of making things?  Like eggs?  Over easy, hard boiled,......


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#37 DawnM

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Posted 19 May 2017 - 08:21 AM

My oldest has ASD and when he was a kid, textures were a huge thing for him.  He simply would refuse to eat.  Just like others are saying, it could last as long as necessary because he wasn't eating whatever it was we were trying to force him to eat.

 

Middle son has some sensory issues, although not as severe.  He would throw up with certain foods, like tomatoes.  His gag reflex is horrible.

 

And therapy?  Wouldn't that cost way more than the OP can afford given her monetary restrictions?

 

OP, as for protein, might he be willing to drink a protein shake?  You can get a huge bag of EAS at Costco for a relatively low cost.  Mix that with ice and something (water, milk, almond milk) and he might fill up and think it is a treat.


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#38 Tanaqui

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Posted 19 May 2017 - 08:24 AM

Unless he has a medical need I'd not focus on the picky eating.

 

His diet is extremely restricted. Under 20 foods is by definition a "medical need". Children do not get this picky for this long just via "bad parenting".

 


Edited by Tanaqui, 19 May 2017 - 08:24 AM.

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#39 SparklyUnicorn

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Posted 19 May 2017 - 08:26 AM


 

And therapy?  Wouldn't that cost way more than the OP can afford given her monetary restrictions?

 

 

 

Absolutely


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#40 zoobie

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Posted 19 May 2017 - 08:39 AM

My oldest has ASD and when he was a kid, textures were a huge thing for him. He simply would refuse to eat. Just like others are saying, it could last as long as necessary because he wasn't eating whatever it was we were trying to force him to eat.

Middle son has some sensory issues, although not as severe. He would throw up with certain foods, like tomatoes. His gag reflex is horrible.

And therapy? Wouldn't that cost way more than the OP can afford given her monetary restrictions?

OP, as for protein, might he be willing to drink a protein shake? You can get a huge bag of EAS at Costco for a relatively low cost. Mix that with ice and something (water, milk, almond milk) and he might fill up and think it is a treat.


Depends on her insurance, but it is worth checking into due to the severe restrictions. It's impacting all of their daily lives.
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#41 SparklyUnicorn

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Posted 19 May 2017 - 09:08 AM

I didn't get the impression she was actually asking for advice.  More venting.  The food cost she posted is high, but not out of the realm of sane.  Kids starting around that age CAN really pack on the food sometimes. 

 

Doctors aren't terribly helpful.  I know when I complain they just roll their eyes.  If the kid is a normal weight and all is fine, what can they say? 

 

A lot of insurance companies won't pay for any of that unless the kid has a lot of medical issues due to eating problems.   

 

 


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#42 WendyAndMilo

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Posted 19 May 2017 - 09:15 AM

Whew!  Thanks guys - I love it when a vent turns into a game plan! :)

1. Off to the library to see about a cookbook we can use together

2. Protein supplement of some sort (pasta, shakes, etc)

3. Focus on filling foods for the three main meals

 

I can't try to add things to the foods he already eats because there's nowhere to hide them - no cooked foods or anything.

 

It really is a texture thing - when he was younger he would just throw it up before even swallowing.  I got him out of that - now he can spit it out in the sink, or preferably swallow it and use words to tell me what he doesn't like.

 

He doesn't have insurance so I'm going to put off the doctors and nutrient testing for now.

 

I remembered that he will eat cheeseburgers at my parents house, but my dad makes some ridiculously expensive cheeseburgers (rib eye, chuck roast and bacon ground together) so that won't be happening here.  But what I am going to do is make him one soon and then see how long afterwards he says he's hungry again.  Because that protein should fill him up for a while right??


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#43 Carrie12345

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Posted 19 May 2017 - 09:15 AM

His diet is extremely restricted. Under 20 foods is by definition a "medical need". Children do not get this picky for this long just via "bad parenting".

 

Especially when I think about how 3 of my 5 kids are more adventurous eaters than I've ever been, lol.  Numbers 2, 3, and 5 will try anything.


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#44 Selkie

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Posted 19 May 2017 - 09:29 AM

I know, I know - welcome to the real world.

 

I just spent $150 at Costco on food that will feed DS for about a week and a half. He's only 10 and there's only one of him!!  How is this possible?!  He eats about 5 full meals a day and is slim; he also gets quite hangry/tearful when I suggest that he not eat.  For the past 6 years, my food budget has been $200 month for the two of us and all the animals.  I am seriously considering upping my work hours - in addition to overloading my college courses for the next semester/homeschooling/remodeling/volunteering - just so I can feed him not crap.  I want to cry.

 

I'm impressed that you were able to keep your food budget so low for that long. $200/month for an adult, a child and animals seems incredibly low to me.


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#45 vonfirmath

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Posted 19 May 2017 - 09:29 AM

His diet is extremely restricted. Under 20 foods is by definition a "medical need". Children do not get this picky for this long just via "bad parenting".

 

Woah. I had no idea. My daughter's list is not the same. But it is still really restrictive (and I struggle to get more foods and vegetables on it)  I always figured that it didn't matter if there wasn't a lot of variety as long as they were eating something in all the food groups

 

Bread

Tortillas

Pancakes

Bologna

Ham

Pork (roast, pulled pork)

(basically most plain meat without sauce or anything mixed in. I was pleasantly surprised to discover this included fish!)

Peanut Butter

French fries

chicken nugget

Cereal

 

Bananas

Corn

maybe lettuce (with no sauce on it)

 

She used to eat baked potatoes and mashed potatoes but not anymore (But I keep trying)

She used to eat sweet potatoes, so again I keep trying

 

She will choose to skip meals instead of eating something she doesn't want to eat -- to the point where she gets sick and is throwing up.  So the most we do now is insist she try a bite of food she doesn't want before we replace it if she really doesn't like it.  (I'm pretty sure a large part is anxiety)  We've talked to her doctor but he is not concerned because she's growing.



#46 Jean in Newcastle

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Posted 19 May 2017 - 09:50 AM

Woah. I had no idea. My daughter's list is not the same. But it is still really restrictive (and I struggle to get more foods and vegetables on it) I always figured that it didn't matter if there wasn't a lot of variety as long as they were eating something in all the food groups

Bread
Tortillas
Pancakes
Bologna
Ham
Pork (roast, pulled pork)
(basically most plain meat without sauce or anything mixed in. I was pleasantly surprised to discover this included fish!)
Peanut Butter
French fries
chicken nugget
Cereal

Bananas
Corn
maybe lettuce (with no sauce on it)

She used to eat baked potatoes and mashed potatoes but not anymore (But I keep trying)
She used to eat sweet potatoes, so again I keep trying

She will choose to skip meals instead of eating something she doesn't want to eat -- to the point where she gets sick and is throwing up. So the most we do now is insist she try a bite of food she doesn't want before we replace it if she really doesn't like it. (I'm pretty sure a large part is anxiety) We've talked to her doctor but he is not concerned because she's growing.


In your case it might be better to focus on treating the anxiety and not the food issue. Cognitive Behavior Therapy, relaxation techniques, meds, are all things to possibly look into. Hopefully the food issues will clear up if the anxiety is reduced.
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#47 lewber

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Posted 19 May 2017 - 10:02 AM

My DS was probably that picky when he was 10! I feel like he ate the same things all the time. I will say his growth spurt and crazy hunger did lead him to try and eat more variety. He was just so hungry the limited foods couldn't keep up I guess.

A couple things I did was use whipping cream instead of milk in waffles, French toast and mac and cheese. It's very calorie dense. I also added butter to anything I could. And if he was having red sauce I would put olive oil on it before the red sauce to up the fat and calories. So if there's anything he likes, try to make it as caloric as possible.
Oh, also roasted potatoes with olive oil and corn with butter were favorite high caloric foods that filled him up.
He is allergic to nuts but I agree that's a great protein for filling up. We had to stick with chicken and steak grilled in butter and oil for protein. And bacon:) boy does he love bacon!!
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#48 Heigh Ho

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Posted 19 May 2017 - 10:52 AM

I have a sensory eater too. He did better with spicy foods than bland foods. Avoid the boil vegetables and toss in butter type of cooking.


As others said, protein plus fat is filling...processed carbs put them on the blood sugar roller coaster. Expand with vegetables..the fiber is necessary for the body. Try them cooked as well as raw. We ended up.with a simple matrix...list proteins, list healthy fats, list veg, list fruits. Choose x from each category, no addl until all categories done. Eggs are very helpful...try egg drop soup.
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#49 katilac

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Posted 19 May 2017 - 11:03 AM

   Because that protein should fill him up for a while right??

 

You would certainly think so!


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#50 maize

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Posted 19 May 2017 - 11:03 AM

Since he likes carrots with dip you could try expanding to other raw vegetables with dip.

Beets make great veggie sticks!

Also bell peppers, broccoli, cauliflower, snap peas, cucumbers...
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