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Autism traits worsening with age?


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What's with the ads?

#51 OhElizabeth

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Posted 31 May 2017 - 10:00 PM

I appreciate the input. He is on the waitlist for a clinic that offers in-home OT and ST. 

We were going to try to go the in-clinic route because there are more openings, but considering his brother needs the same services (OT, ST, and PT), but has vastly different needs, there is no way--logistically--that I can swing all of the in-clinic hours spread between the two of them, when considering travel time. None of the clinics are able to stack appointments (i.e. doing the entirety of one child's therapies certain days of the week and the other's child's therapies other days of the week). 

 

All services are in-home here until age 3 (age five for us, since Marco was "in the system" before age 3), but Marco has aged out of that particular program, and there is only one company here (that I've been able to find) that offers in-home past the age of 5.

 

Hopefully our names are coming up on the waitlist -- I received a call from them the other day. 

 

Not to rabbit trail or be confusing or whatever, but ABA is usually (or can be) in-home. You would be looking for a behaviorist. The certification for that is BCBA, and sometimes they'll be certified, sometimes they won't be. But it would be in-home, yes. I totally get why you're trying to eliminate transitions and keep it tidy, whew! 

 

ABA would not be the same as OT or speech. Guess that's why I was confused by your answer. I'll just say that as much as I don't want to be sort of bandwagon or pro any particular intervention, it does happen that people are really of the ABA is horrible persuasion and then they change their tune. And at least around here, ABA is just an umbrella term for insurance coverage. The people are usually trained in LOTS of techniques and conversant on LOTS of things you can be doing. The point is bringing in more hours, more people who are fresh, and getting an intensity of interaction that really helps the kids make leaps. My ds finishes his sessions CRAVING more interaction. And we never ever do anything that is DTT. Like when people say what they think ABA is or has to be, that doesn't mean that's what a behaviorist would do for your particular situation. Our behaviorist specializes in home settings and has significant experience with gifted kids. I really think they can have niches like that to where maybe one behaviorist would be a terrible fit and the next amazing. It makes her very intuitive on why he's doing things, and she has a really natural, respectful approach to things. 

 

I know it's hard. I'm just saying it's something you could have on your mental list, to see if you could find someone like that who was respectful, not a purist, good with gifted kids, able to work in the home so you didn't have to go more places, etc.


Edited by OhElizabeth, 31 May 2017 - 10:01 PM.


#52 Moved On

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Posted 31 May 2017 - 11:21 PM

ABA would not be the same as OT or speech. Guess that's why I was confused by your answer. I'll just say that as much as I don't want to be sort of bandwagon or pro any particular intervention, it does happen that people are really of the ABA is horrible persuasion and then they change their tune.

And then there are those that change their mind and decide against ABA because it did not suit their child or whatever other reason. ABA, unlike DIRFloortime and SCERTS, is a very broad term. Many areas with limited services still have the Lovaas model. Still others do not agree with ABA for personal reasons that others may not understand or be able to relate to.

We all pick what *we* feel fits our *own* family and child(ren). Sometimes, a polite response does not always come through to some people. Interesting how everyone is always so concerned about autistic people's social thinking deficits!