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#1 Hilltopmom

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Posted 10 May 2017 - 01:27 PM

I had good responses to my "using Ps resource room as a homeschooler" thread.

Currently, I'm leaning heavily to just enrolling dd in school for 8th grade, since I want her to attend for high school, or at least the vo tech program in grades 11/12. And I'd like to see what they can really offer & how she responds in 8th so I can make an informed decision for high school.

We'll let them update her testing & meet for her IEP & see what classroom options they have & suggest for her.
In the meantime, I'll have her visit & shadow a day before school gets out to at least see what she'll be getting into.

She's ready to get out of the house away from the littles every day. And do school with someone other than me!

Anyways-
What else should I ask about/ consider when sending a kid to school for 8th?

Obvious stuff like resource room style, self contained options, AIS, I know what to ask about IEP specifics (I used to teach 7-12 special Ed),
But what am I forgetting about the transition from homeschool to school? For a kid with severe LDs?
(Likely needs self contained for at least math, maybe ELA, not push in services)
I have a friend who is a counselor there I'll try to hook her up with too.

How do I prepare her? How do kids get used to getting so much less sleep?- bus comes at 6:30, she usually sleeps from 10Pm- 10AM, obviously go to bed earlier, but she can't go to sleep at 5PM.

She won't want to do sports (she dances instead) or after school clubs since dance is her thing. (& she may have to cut back on dance next year as she adjusts). But I do want her to become part of the school community.

Stupid question maybe, but I don't think she'll be able to remember a locker code. She can't learn our phone number. A aggghh... I'm starting to freak out.

Any tips appreciated :)

Edited by Hilltopmom, 10 May 2017 - 01:48 PM.


#2 OhElizabeth

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Posted 10 May 2017 - 01:40 PM

Not to skip your other very useful questions, but first I would pursue the IEP. If you make a formal written request *now* it will start the legal timeline, meaning she'll have an IEP by fall. If you wait, spill the beans that you're enrolling, etc., what can happen is they'll say they want to do it their normal way--enroll, watch for a grading period, refer, begin the evals for the IEP process. That means functionally that it will take the school year to have an IEP and it will be in place for fall the following year. 

 

I gather some places will bring in some supports earlier, but I'm just saying that kind of ugghy situation for transfers can happen. You've been on the end you thought was really nice, but now you're going to be on the other side, where it doesn't seem so nice. ;) 

 

Does she have ADHD as well? My dd was sleeping a lot like that, and it was fatigue from her ADHD. You might want to get private psych evals lined up, see if meds would be a good idea (to lessen the strain, to help her wake better), and use that list to help you advocate. You can run the evals parallel. You just need some kind of (data, test scores) to justify them beginning evals. With no evidence, they'll probably just say to enroll her and let them watch her for a grading period.


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#3 Hilltopmom

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Posted 10 May 2017 - 01:47 PM

She does have an IEP from our old district.
So, lots of test scores,they are just 2 years old, so new district wants to re do eval.

Written request went in today.

She definately won't start without a good IEP in place. It would ruin her. Not happening.

Not sure on the ADD, we've been questioning if that's going on too. Good point. We may start with the ped to trial ADD meds for the school year. Neuro psych Eval wait list here is a year long. (The sleep may be depression related though too, although with meds, she's doing pretty good now. For awhile it was super low iron levels, but those have come up)

Edited by Hilltopmom, 10 May 2017 - 01:50 PM.


#4 OneStepAtATime

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Posted 10 May 2017 - 02:10 PM

The change in her sleep schedule is going to be hard.  Especially at her age.  Kids start really struggling to go to sleep at an early time.  12 hours is a lot of sleep, though.  I agree, i would look into that to see if there is an underlying cause that is not just strictly this kiddo needs a lot of sleep.

 

For the sleep adjustment itself I would consider doing one of two things to help her get ready for the fall.

 

Option One:

Go cold turkey on sleeping in.  Wake her up every single morning without fail by 5:45am for the next several months.  Let her go to be in the evening whenever she feels she needs to go to sleep.  If that means 5pm that means 5pm.  Get her used to getting up early and getting ready for her day.  It may take quite a bit of time to shift things so that this is her new normal.  I definitely wouldn't start the day school starts.

 

Option Two: 

Do a gradual shift.  Wake her up every morning by 9am, then shift half an hour to 830 then another half hour to 8 and so on until you are getting her up by at least 6am.  Starting two weeks before, start getting her up at 545 (or whenever you think she needs to get up to have enough time to get ready in the morning...and make sure you add in some pad time for those first few weeks as you both adjust).

 

 

For general prep in shifting to a pretty different schedule:

  • Get a plan in place for what to do when she first walks in the door at the end of her day and get into a routine of doing it each and every day.  She may need a lot of help with this at first.  Where is she going to put her backpack?  When does she start homework?  Where will she do homework?  Where does the homework go when she is finished?  
  • What about her lunch?  Bring to school or buy school lunches?  If bringing to school, when does the next day's lunch get packed and what would work well as a lunch food?  Make a list of at least 6-10 options so she has some things to choose from each week.  Plan it out the weekend before and make sure all ingredients are already available.
  • Lay out clothes for the next day, including shoes, the night before.  Help her do that every school night.  Is there a dress code?  Uniform?
  • Also, the night before make 100% certain that ALL homework/books/etc. are in her backpack (if they require or allow backpacks) and that her backpack is at the door, ready to go.  
  • Streamline her morning routine and get her used to doing the same thing in pretty much the same order over and over so it is in procedural and muscle memory.  That way, even if she wakes up slowly, she isn't having to think too much, she can just get it done.

As for IEP and school accommodations, etc. I don't have a lot to say since OhE said what I was going to say and you seem to have that covered.  I was wondering, though, are you sure they offer a self-contained option for math?  



#5 OhElizabeth

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Posted 10 May 2017 - 02:39 PM

Our ped does the Quotient, which I really like. It's one of the tap tap tests, kicks out a lot of data. And yes, depression and the ADHD go together. 

 

Have you checked her for retained reflexes and sensory issues?

 

As far as changing her sleep routine, it might be easier on your parenting routine if you let there be another reason, another person, a motivator behind that. Like send her to a camp with early rising or her grandparents or something.

 

I don't know, I'm at the stage where I'm done trying to make everything better. Like at some point it's really their gig. If she wants to get up and go to the school, she'll get up and go and find a way to make it work. And if she doesn't, all it's doing is ruining your relationship.


Edited by OhElizabeth, 10 May 2017 - 02:41 PM.

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#6 Lecka

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Posted 10 May 2017 - 03:05 PM

Do you think she could do her lunch code (at my son's middle school they also use the same number for logging into computers and checking ii library books) if she has it written on her binder? For elementary school my son could have help from the lunch lady and the lunch lady was extremely nice and could help him. She knew he needed extra help.

I don't know on lockers.

I would ask the teacher. They may have some way they teach it. They may assign lockers by the teacher's room. I think they would help her out knowing she is a new student. And then they may have a system in place -- I doubt she is the only kid who has a harder time with these things.

We moved in March and it has gone much smoother than I had expected. I have a 6th grader who went from the oldest in a K-6 school to youngest in middle school; and I think he got help the first few days with his locker from the teacher (his hometown teacher I think) bc his locker was assigned by her room.

Anyway -- I don't think they will leave her hanging!

I hope it goes well!!!!!!!!

Edited by Lecka, 10 May 2017 - 03:08 PM.

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#7 Storygirl

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Posted 10 May 2017 - 03:14 PM

Ask the school about the lockers. At one school we toured, they have a few lockers that do not have locks built in (the rest do). Students who can't do combinations are assigned one of those. They can bring their own lock from home (one they know how to work) or just leave it unlocked if they are trusting.

 

But not all schools have this. Our friends are starting at a new school next year, and all locks have lockers. They give students as much time as they need to practice, but they have to have a locker with a lock built in. (Although I would think that if it were written into the IEP, the school would have to provide a lock-free spot for a specific student to store her things).

 

I hate combination locks, myself and have always had trouble working them. DS13 has a lock for his locker at school (we bought a simple one and programed it with a number he already knew), but he leaves his locker unlocked. His happens to be in a corner, and I doubt anyone notices.


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#8 Hilltopmom

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Posted 10 May 2017 - 03:19 PM

OH, on the sleep routine, I forgot, she'll be at summer camp 2 weeks in August, so early rising there.. We just have to keep it up for the weeks between when camp ends & school starts!

#9 Hilltopmom

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Posted 10 May 2017 - 03:30 PM

I wasn't familiar with the Quotient, but I just scored her on a Vanderbilt & um, yeah, inattentive.. According to that scale, although not taking into account any of her other issues.

#10 City Mouse

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Posted 10 May 2017 - 06:23 PM

For the locker thing, the school may be able to provide a key lock if she can't remember a combination.
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#11 maize

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Posted 10 May 2017 - 07:39 PM

The sleep schedule bit would really give me pause--there is A Lot of research out there about teens performing better both academically and emotionally when they are allowed to wake up later in the morning. For a kid who already struggles academically I would be very hesitant to throw them into a schedule where they have to be out the door by 6:30.
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#12 Hilltopmom

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Posted 10 May 2017 - 07:47 PM

The sleep schedule bit would really give me pause--there is A Lot of research out there about teens performing better both academically and emotionally when they are allowed to wake up later in the morning. For a kid who already struggles academically I would be very hesitant to throw them into a schedule where they have to be out the door by 6:30.


I know. And it's a big pause for me too. It is.
But she's not getting what she needs at home at all anymore.
Need to try something else.
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#13 OneStepAtATime

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Posted 10 May 2017 - 08:03 PM

I know. And it's a big pause for me too. It is.
But she's not getting what she needs at home at all anymore.
Need to try something else.

:grouphug:  :grouphug:  :grouphug: 

 

Is there any way to enroll her in some sort of summer something that starts early that would begin in July?  Like by mid July?  I fear that trying to completely shift her sleep schedule in August, right before school starts, using just a two week camp, may be very hard on all of you.

 

If she can adjust to the new sleep schedule and get used to it well before school starts then maybe things won't be so hard.  Otherwise, it may make the whole transition a LOT harder.


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#14 katilac

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Posted 12 May 2017 - 11:36 AM

I know. And it's a big pause for me too. It is.
But she's not getting what she needs at home at all anymore.
Need to try something else.

 

Does the local school have a part-time option? Going in the afternoon might be a good way to start.

 

ETA: How far away is the school, would driving her be an option? Carpool? Pay someone to take her? The bus tends to add on a ridiculous amount of time, plus it's usually the harshest social environment related to school. 


Edited by katilac, 12 May 2017 - 11:38 AM.

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#15 Hilltopmom

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Posted 12 May 2017 - 11:40 AM

Does the local school have a part-time option? Going in the afternoon might be a good way to start.

ETA: How far away is the school, would driving her be an option? Carpool? Pay someone to take her? The bus tends to add on a ridiculous amount of time, plus it's usually the harshest social environment related to school.


No, it's not legal in NY. Although I'm trying to get them to agree to going just for resource room or Msth intervention. Need to email state Ed for clarification about that particular option.
That was my first choice, then starting leaning towards just sending her full time.
And now, she wants to go...

#16 OneStepAtATime

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Posted 12 May 2017 - 12:07 PM

No, it's not legal in NY. Although I'm trying to get them to agree to going just for resource room or Msth intervention. Need to email state Ed for clarification about that particular option.
That was my first choice, then starting leaning towards just sending her full time.
And now, she wants to go...

Hey, having her by-in is great!  Hopefully you can work with the school to make this a successful endeavor for all of you.


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#17 katilac

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Posted 12 May 2017 - 01:10 PM

No, it's not legal in NY. Although I'm trying to get them to agree to going just for resource room or Msth intervention. Need to email state Ed for clarification about that particular option.
That was my first choice, then starting leaning towards just sending her full time.
And now, she wants to go...

 

I mostly suggested the part-time option because of the big schedule change. If she wants to go, that is going to help smooth the transition for sure! 


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#18 Pen

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Posted 16 May 2017 - 01:17 AM

I had good responses to my "using Ps resource room as a homeschooler" thread.

Currently, I'm leaning heavily to just enrolling dd in school for 8th grade, since I want her to attend for high school, or at least the vo tech program in grades 11/12. And I'd like to see what they can really offer & how she responds in 8th so I can make an informed decision for high school.

We'll let them update her testing & meet for her IEP & see what classroom options they have & suggest for her.
In the meantime, I'll have her visit & shadow a day before school gets out to at least see what she'll be getting into.

She's ready to get out of the house away from the littles every day. And do school with someone other than me!

Anyways-
What else should I ask about/ consider when sending a kid to school for 8th?

Obvious stuff like resource room style, self contained options, AIS, I know what to ask about IEP specifics (I used to teach 7-12 special Ed),
But what am I forgetting about the transition from homeschool to school? For a kid with severe LDs?
(Likely needs self contained for at least math, maybe ELA, not push in services)
I have a friend who is a counselor there I'll try to hook her up with too.

How do I prepare her? How do kids get used to getting so much less sleep?- bus comes at 6:30, she usually sleeps from 10Pm- 10AM, obviously go to bed earlier, but she can't go to sleep at 5PM.

She won't want to do sports (she dances instead) or after school clubs since dance is her thing. (& she may have to cut back on dance next year as she adjusts). But I do want her to become part of the school community.

Stupid question maybe, but I don't think she'll be able to remember a locker code. She can't learn our phone number. A aggghh... I'm starting to freak out.

Any tips appreciated :)

 

My son is finishing 8th grade at local public school after 6 years of homeschool. Our situation is different, but I can tell you some plusses and minuses or tips from this experience.

 

For us, the school is a very small rural school, and his class is unusually small even for this school (around 10 students in his grade).  He'd had an IEP in past and then moved out of it, and I did not seek IEP or 504 thus far. They know some of his issues, but the main things they could do like give him more time to complete things  (test, assignments) is the last thing he wants since he basically hates the academic part of school and would rather have zero time on that, not extra time.

 

He was offered a chance to start at around now last year when all he'd have pretty much would be the end of school fun stuff and nothing really expected of him. He did not want to do that, but I think it would have been helpful as a way to transition in.  If that is an option for your dd you might want to consider that.

 

But I'm glad that he went in 8th rather than waiting for 9th as the transition was not smooth. ... I think starting in High school would have been much more stressful.

 

My son's "thing" is/was ice skating, but he joined track (cross country and track and field) as a good way to meet people and have some more social connection at the school. I strongly suggest that you find one or two things at the school that your dd can join.  As it turned out, my son is a very good runner (better probably at running than skating), so that turned into a major focus and energy area, which is both good and bad. But at least for the social aspect, I'd say it is 100% good, and also helps him to have something to drain off excess ADHD-like energy and where he can excel so that the things that are harder are not the only thing going on.  Trying to do both skating and running was a severe drain on me (as chauffeur), however, and that may need to change this next year.  It was worse than it might have been due to the skating having a big problem with nasty people, so that emotionally that was a big drain on me also.

 

Anyway, at least here, joining a sport or club or band or similar group is really very key to fitting into the school community. Running was a pretty good choice since there is not a whole team depending on everyone and if there was an important skating event it could be prioritized or vice-versa. And the cross country team is a small group that at his school (and at least two others I know of) seems to have pretty tight social bonds.

 

Sleep and getting up was surprisingly easier than I thought it would be. My son also tended to sleep in during homeschool, and I doubted he'd be able to handle early rising for regular school, but he gets himself up at 5:30AM for going to public school. Practice ahead of time did not work, but excitement plus an alarm got him up the first day and nearly every day since. He usually goes to bed at around 9PM, and then sleeps more on weekends. He can nap or eat on the bus if he wants.  Hardest have been when he has gotten home really late due to away track meets.

 

DS could  remember a locker code, but had trouble with the turning of the dial to the right spots and getting it to open. After trouble on the first day with dressing down for gym and not doing it fast enough to please the gym teacher (who told him he'd have a detention if it happened again-- so that he came home with the question, "Mom, what is a detention?" (so explaining things like that "detention" "tardy" etc. may be necessary--we've just dealt with things as they arise), he seems to leave his lockers unlocked, and keeps valuables with him, generally --- or valuables can be checked into school office. So far that seems to have worked out okay, amazingly.  He has trouble with dating his papers, but at least manages to get his name on them usually.

 

Lack of being able to move around a lot frequently has been difficult. He could do homeschool while moving, swinging, up a tree, etc.: that can't be done in regular school. He seems to need many hours of down/alone time after he is done with school, which is a problem for homework and chores. I think a plan of how to use time, set up in advance and agreed to, might have helped--especially given the 2 sports situation.

 

 

Keeping track of what he needs to do when has been difficult for him and extremely frustrating for me. He has a ton of zeroes due to work not done, or done but not turned in. And in homeschool if something seemed like busy work for him, he did not have to do it, or otoh if he needed more time on something to learn it, he could have that. In regular school he is expected to do everything on their schedule.  I tried to set him up in an organized way in terms of planner and binder system etc., but he basically refuses to deal with any of that and just wings it.  If you could work out organization systems that will work and that your child would use, I'd say that would help hugely, hugely, hugely!  And let her know that some of school is sort of just a "game" where you have to play by the rules even if they seem arbitrary.

 

Letting go of what he is doing in school after 6 years of homeschool is hard for me--especially when he is underperforming what I know he "could" do, or when teachers contact me to let me know he is goofing off or not turning in his work etc..  Letting him own what he does (or does not do) and the consequences is a new thing for us both.

 

 The sports helped some there since if he did not get at least a C average he lost sports eligibility.  As with not understanding what a "detention" was, sports eligibility rules were new for him--and also for me..he was on "academic probation" for quite a while before either of us understood that.  It seemed to me like he was back to doing nothing on his academics again, so I asked him if he was going back into a trouble area with that and he said it didn't matter since the track season was over for him due to sprained ankle. I told him it does matter because his grades now will affect his eligibility for next fall. This seemed to be a surprise to him. But at least he has something to care about in terms of academics for sports eligibility sake rather than for its own sake.

 

Part way through the year, my son started to seem to have extreme anxiety and similar issues, and I started him with a therapist (which became yet another time and chauffering issue).  I wish I'd had someone lined up just in case ahead of time, or maybe even better, someone who he was already used to so as not to have to achieve getting comfortable with someone at a time of distress. I'll be working on improving this over the summer since we found someone who could see him soon after the problems came up--but I think we need some better answers, and family dynamic help, not just someone for him to talk to.

 

This year he has had no free period for a study hall. I plan to make sure he has a study hall slot next year as I think that would help a lot with the issue of homework and study time.

 

Probably not an issue for your dd as a dancer, but being ready to handle things like a school dance or other social situations could be important.

 

My son had not had sleepovers experiences for various reasons, and in the summer before starting school he did a week of intense camping with a youth corps group, which I think helped him. Then when there was an overnight track event with school, that was not a big deal.


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#19 Pen

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Posted 16 May 2017 - 12:03 PM

...
How do I prepare her? How do kids get used to getting so much less sleep?- bus comes at 6:30, she usually sleeps from 10Pm- 10AM, obviously go to bed earlier, but she can't go to sleep at 5PM.

She won't want to do sports (she dances instead) or after school clubs since dance is her thing. (& she may have to cut back on dance next year as she adjusts). But I do want her to become part of the school community.

....

 

 

My son loves the bus ride, which helps him to get going. having things ready in advance so that time in the morning can be made a short as possible would help. (standard group of clothing so that what to wear is not an issue, easy/fast breakfast, maybe shower night before).

 

Ask people you know there what helps to be part of the school social community, and even what exact club or sport has nice kids in it. Maybe at yours it is not a sport or club or band.  If it is though, consider a fall sport so the social aspect is in place at the beginning... and then it might only be one season needed to fit in, instead of needing the full year for a club.  Consider a co-ed sport or activity to meet both boys and girls and one that is fairly individual to have less pressure for consistent attendance.


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#20 Ravin

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Posted 16 May 2017 - 12:55 PM

One option for difficult to memorize but unavoidable numbers would be for her to keep them on her person, such as on a customized dog tag type pendant or a bracelet or something like that.


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#21 Hilltopmom

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Posted 17 May 2017 - 05:50 AM

My son loves the bus ride, which helps him to get going. having things ready in advance so that time in the morning can be made a short as possible would help. (standard group of clothing so that what to wear is not an issue, easy/fast breakfast, maybe shower night before).

Ask people you know there what helps to be part of the school social community, and even what exact club or sport has nice kids in it. Maybe at yours it is not a sport or club or band. If it is though, consider a fall sport so the social aspect is in place at the beginning... and then it might only be one season needed to fit in, instead of needing the full year for a club. Consider a co-ed sport or activity to meet both boys and girls and one that is fairly individual to have less pressure for consistent attendance.


Pen,
Thank you! Lots if good info I hadnt thought about!
I do want her to be part of the school community,,she thinks its not necessary, but it will be,
I know- I went to this school many moons ago. She'll also connect with kids innthe neighborhood now that we live in town, if she goes to the school.

I think its extra hard for special ed kids to make connections, because they arent in all the regular classes.

Shes an artsy kid, so my guess is she will "find her tribe" in art classes, choir, drama club. Drama is after school & she doesnt like to have speaking parts, but likes making sets & working backstsge.
Hoping that may work at least one season with her dance schedule.

I dont think we could make an afterschool sport work,she dances 4-5 nights a week & sports get out too late to catch class. Dancers here usually have to commit to one or the other by this age.

Im pretty worrried about her over doing it, academic work & long days exhaust her... I may make her cut back on dance for awhile while she adjusts.

Again, thanks
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#22 OhElizabeth

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Posted 17 May 2017 - 07:32 AM

Not sure I would cut back something she's already in that is a physical outlet and stabilizing. Have you talked with other dancer moms to see how they handle things?

 

The school can do a 504 for that executive function stuff. The more you put structures in place, the better. Schools vary. Sure they're trying to fade supports at this age, but they *do* still have things. 

 

If EF issues are huge, you can hire an Educational Therapist to help. They work with the dc 30 minutes a week, sometimes by phone, and they help them sort through all these issues, use their tools, keep on track. That way it's not Mom but it's still getting done. There's a certification for it.


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#23 Pen

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Posted 17 May 2017 - 12:34 PM

Pen,
Thank you! Lots if good info I hadnt thought about!
I do want her to be part of the school community,,she thinks its not necessary, but it will be,
I know- I went to this school many moons ago. She'll also connect with kids innthe neighborhood now that we live in town, if she goes to the school.

I think its extra hard for special ed kids to make connections, because they arent in all the regular classes.

Shes an artsy kid, so my guess is she will "find her tribe" in art classes, choir, drama club. Drama is after school & she doesnt like to have speaking parts, but likes making sets & working backstsge.
Hoping that may work at least one season with her dance schedule.

I dont think we could make an afterschool sport work,she dances 4-5 nights a week & sports get out too late to catch class. Dancers here usually have to commit to one or the other by this age.

Im pretty worrried about her over doing it, academic work & long days exhaust her... I may make her cut back on dance for awhile while she adjusts.

Again, thanks

 

 

I think being part of something is really important and that you are right and your daughter probably wrong about this. Though if I had a child adamant against club or etc. I don't think I'd force it. Possibly social time is more important to my ds than your dd. Or possibly your dd gets enough at dance, while skating is not so helpful for my ds because it is mainly girls.

 

Arts would be good.  My ds takes choir which is during school for credit, and also does have quite a lot of "tribe" aspect to it.  At least at his school, an art class has not given any social time--it is pretty much "go to your table and do your work," as much as academic classes are. Maybe more so since some academics have had group projects. PE games class had some opportunity for connecting with others. Ds also had an elective that included things like gardening, designing shoes from found materials, etc., that gave some social contact. Drama club would likely be very good for social aspects--but check time commitment since it might also present a significant conflict with dancing.


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#24 Hilltopmom

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Posted 17 May 2017 - 12:45 PM

In a burst of bravery, she just went down the street & introduced herself to a girl who looks about her age! (They had a half day & we saw her get off the bus)

The girl was friendly but a bit taken aback- teens your don't know rarely knock on your door & introduce themselves, lol.

Hoping I can foster that relationship a bit this summer (we have a beach in our neighborhood where everyone hangs out)..

Nice to know someone on the bus the first day, at least. They're the same age, but dd is a grade younger since we red shirted her (I will never hear the end of that, she's mad that she's not with kids her own age, since she finds 7th graders ridiculously immature. She's right)
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#25 Pen

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Posted 17 May 2017 - 02:26 PM

Is your dd likely to become a professional dancer?



#26 Hilltopmom

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Posted 17 May 2017 - 02:41 PM

Is your dd likely to become a professional dancer?

No. (I mean, she'd love to, but doesn't have "that" level of talent)

She didn't start till age 11 but it's the only sport she's ever loved & is good at. (Huge confidence booster for her)
It's definately her thing. She's on the dance team in addition to just taking classes.

She also helps teach 2 of the younger classes this year.
I could see her teaching the younger classes one day,

Edited by Hilltopmom, 17 May 2017 - 02:41 PM.


#27 Pen

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Posted 17 May 2017 - 02:53 PM

I was asking because if she were working toward professional, then it would be harder to go light on dance for a season. 


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#28 Hilltopmom

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Posted 18 May 2017 - 01:32 PM

Turns out, one of her dance friends goes to the same school & they're the same grade :)
Both girls are thrilled. (apparently, the topic of where they go to school had never come up before)

Fingers crossed for a good eval & CSE meeting. (I'm sure I'll be back to panic about that before then, lol)

She'll go visit & spend a day there soon.
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