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Course name for transcript


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#1 Mshokie

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Posted 23 April 2017 - 10:07 PM

In a bilingual homeschool, what name do you give your child's minority language courses on the high school transcript? I want the title to indicate that DS is not just taking the run-of-the-mill German 1, 2, 3, etc., but that he is building on significant prior German knowledge. I am thinking about calling our course sequence something like "German for Bilinguals". But I am open to other suggestions.

Is Heritage (Language) the term most recognized by colleges for this situation? I perused some public school course descriptions and those for Heritage (Language) seemed to have a negative connotation. The descriptions seemed to imply that the kids need to be taught proper (non-slang) speech and were essentially illiterate in the non-English language prior to the class.
How do college admissions see the term "Heritage"? Do they not even consider that a real foreign language effort if the student has grown up with two languages? Do we need to learn a 3rd language from scratch? Should I just use "Heritage German" but write a more positive description?

#2 Rockhopper

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Posted 23 April 2017 - 10:28 PM

What about German Composition and Literature I, II, III etc.? Basically the same title and description you'd give a regular progression LA course.


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#3 CadenceSophia

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Posted 24 April 2017 - 12:09 AM

Is Heritage (Language) the term most recognized by colleges for this situation? I perused some public school course descriptions and those for Heritage (Language) seemed to have a negative connotation. The descriptions seemed to imply that the kids need to be taught proper (non-slang) speech and were essentially illiterate in the non-English language prior to the class.
How do college admissions see the term "Heritage"? Do they not even consider that a real foreign language effort if the student has grown up with two languages? Do we need to learn a 3rd language from scratch? Should I just use "Heritage German" but write a more positive description?


Heritage language is NOT the term. Heritage language as a term currently means that the language was spoken in the community or home by parents or relatives, but that the student/child never fully learned the language or was removed from the environment at an early age and currently does not speak the language.
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#4 Joan in GE

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Posted 24 April 2017 - 03:13 AM

I'm not on enough to know what materials you are using....

 

We tried to have easily identifiable levels that would compare to US high schools with well-known testing to prove the level.

 

I would think at some point your son could test out of some DE courses and thus prove his level by taking real college level courses.

 

In fact the levels we used were probably too low but in for us it didn't matter too much as they weren't going to study languages in college.

 

I looked at their work at it was approximately Fr I in 7th grade. (The level of conversation was far superior but grammar and writing were probably similar). Then Fr II 8th and Fr iii 9th...though I think I had them do the SAT II in 9th or possible 10th for one child...and then the AP in 10th or 11th depending..After that I just labeled it Fr V and I think up to VI...

 

For German, because they were using an online school, they could just use those levels and do them at a younger age and then the AP as well.

 

There were some interesting discussions on the usefulness of this all a few years back...

 



#5 Mshokie

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Posted 24 April 2017 - 05:31 AM

Heritage language is NOT the term. Heritage language as a term currently means that the language was spoken in the community or home by parents or relatives, but that the student/child never fully learned the language or was removed from the environment at an early age and currently does not speak the language.

Thank you for that clarification. That is pretty much what I thought based on the course descriptions I read.

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#6 bibiche

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Posted 24 April 2017 - 08:59 AM

Heritage language is NOT the term. Heritage language as a term currently means that the language was spoken in the community or home by parents or relatives, but that the student/child never fully learned the language or was removed from the environment at an early age and currently does not speak the language.


At our university it means bilingual speakers who may not have formal knowledge of grammar, etc. Nevertheless, probably not the desired term for OP's transcript.
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#7 Monica_in_Switzerland

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Posted 25 April 2017 - 10:29 AM

Depending on your kids written German level, something like:

 

Year 1 : Advanced German Grammar (or German 3 or 4 if you feel it would be similar in scope to that level)

Year 2: German literature 1

... and so on.

 

I'd look at the course titles for 300 level university classes to get an idea, or do something like:

The Great German Philosophers, (taught in German)

German Poetry (taught in German)

etc...


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#8 Mshokie

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Posted 25 April 2017 - 05:41 PM

My original intention was to start counting this year (6th grade) as the first high school credit in German. Though, I may reconsider that as I am seeing people talk about colleges not counting credits from middle school years. So, maybe I don't need to with about the course title for a few of years. And when DS does start high school, we can just call it German 4 or 5. Right now, DS has no plans to do anything with German in college, though I would like to leave that option available to him.

This year, we are using a DaZ (German as a Second Language) curriculum that I bought in Germany. It's written for B1 level. I have also thrown in some abridged readers of German classics. Overall, I'd feel comfortable saying we are solidly on par with at least a American high school German 3 class.

I had DS take the National German exam level 1 just recently. He found it pretty easy. The plan is for him to take the level 2 this December and then the other 2 in the following years. I know those tests are below his level. I am planning for the AP exam in 9th or 10th grade (if I can find a school that will let him take the exam). We would need to fill out the rest of the 3 high school years of foreign language after the AP exam. I was thinking about doing a year of German history and government using a German textbook. And/or maybe a DE course at a local university.



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#9 Renai

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Posted 26 April 2017 - 04:34 PM

In our state, Heritage Spanish does not have a negative connotation, but we are (were) legally a bilingual state by constitution. What about German Language Arts, or something similar? Just like we have English Language Arts, and understood to be English for English speakers. I have used Heritage Spanish with no problems, but recently changed it to Spanish LA, as I felt it better reflected some of what we've done. She had her 10th grade year as Bilingual LA, as she did a lot of her reading and writing in both languages. She CLEPped out of two years of college Spanish, so I gave her credit for the last 2 years of Spanish LA as well.