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#51 justasque

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Posted 21 April 2017 - 09:52 AM

At school and in Scouts we learned flag etiquette; it drives me nuts when flags are left up 24/7 or flown in tatters.

Growing up, there were a few folks in my community with proper flag poles who used them properly; I suspect they were WWII or Korea vets and have mostly passed on because there aren't as many nowadays.
We have had a lot of POW-MIA flags in my community since Vietnam; they are flown with the USA flag.  When I see a USA flag, most of the time there is a POW-MIA flag flying with it.

I also see large USA flags flying from the beds of pickup trucks.

A neighbor had the stars-and-bars hung on the front of their house for many years; don't know what was up with that as we aren't a Confederate state.

I see a lot of "Don't Tread On Me" Gadsden flags too; sometimes it's USA, POW-MIA, and Gadsden.

 


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#52 Dotwithaperiod

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Posted 21 April 2017 - 10:10 AM

I remember when everyone got flagpoles in front of their homes when we lived in TX, right after 9/11.
Up here in western NY, there are many trashed out homes and crumbly farms that fly Confederate flags or nail them to the side of their house. Occasionally I'll see rusted out pickup trucks with both the American flag and confederate flag on homemade posts in the truck-bed. I think the Southern equivalent would be hanging those metal testicles from their truck bumper.
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#53 texasmom33

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Posted 21 April 2017 - 11:53 AM

I remember when everyone got flagpoles in front of their homes when we lived in TX, right after 9/11.
Up here in western NY, there are many trashed out homes and crumbly farms that fly Confederate flags or nail them to the side of their house. Occasionally I'll see rusted out pickup trucks with both the American flag and confederate flag on homemade posts in the truck-bed. I think the Southern equivalent would be hanging those metal testicles from their truck bumper.

 

Ah yes, the truck bed flags. We have those too! (Not WE personally, but we as in I see them locally). Sometimes with the confederate flag, sometimes with sports teams. I don't think I've ever seen one with a US flag or a Texas flag come to think of it. POW though sometimes....now I'm going to pay even more attention. 

 

I am so happy the bull balls trend seems to be fading from trucks. So stupid. 


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#54 Bluegoat

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Posted 21 April 2017 - 12:00 PM

I wonder if non-flag regions have other patriotic symbols of some kind they use instead?


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#55 Garga

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Posted 21 April 2017 - 12:07 PM

After 911 there were flags EVERYWHERE. Homemade flags draped on every bridge over the beltway around Baltimore. I remember there were tons of homemade banners next to the homemade flags reading things like, "God Bless America" or "United we Stand". Someone had hung banner that said, "Stand Stong" (sic). You can see the person, so earnest and feeling very patriotic, with a marker, creating their banner made out of a bedsheet, "S...t....o...n...g".

There have always been flags. American flags are all over the place. You can't get through a neighborhood without seeing a few. I know a bunch of people who hang them. And anything red, white, and blue sort of counts. When the local Royal Farm convenience store opened up they displayed flags with a red band, white band, and blue band, going from left to right. We happened to have some Chinese exchange students visiting at the time and they asked, "French? This is French?" because it looked like the French flag. I had a hard time explaining to them that Americans slap red, white, and blue colors on everything and Royal Farms wasn't a French store.

Incidently, we also drove through Gettysburg while they were here and there were reenactors with guns walking around. The Chinese students' heads about flew off their necks as they flipped their heads around to see all the Americans walking around with rifles slung over their shoulders. I tried to explain that they were costumes, but they didn't understand me. They went home with stories of how Americans wander around with their rifles.

Edited by Garga, 21 April 2017 - 12:08 PM.

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#56 Garga

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Posted 21 April 2017 - 12:11 PM

Flying the American Flag is very common in the US. On patriotic holidays, it is especially common, but a lot of people (us included) generally fly one daily. We even have one at our beach house and fly it when we are there (often patriotic holidays).

In the state of Maryland, there is also a lot of love for the print of our state flag. (As state flags go, it is quite dynamic.) i don't see the actual Maryland flag that often except in front of businesses, but magnets, hats, stickers, clothing, mugs - everything exists with the Maryland flag and many Marylanders have some of this swag. Both of our cars have a Maryland flag magnet or sticker on them. We love our crabs and Maryland flag around here!



So true about the MD flag. I saw it everywhere when I lived in MD. I've been in PA for 14 years now and I still am not sure what the PA flag looks like. But I can spot an MD one a mile away.
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#57 Laura Corin

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Posted 21 April 2017 - 04:25 PM

I wonder if non-flag regions have other patriotic symbols of some kind they use instead?

 

I can't think of any for the UK.  We don't have pictures of royalty as the do in Thailand.  We try to hold onto red phone boxes even when no one uses them....  

 

Oh, here's one: we have extremely strict building regulations (zoning) so that cities can't sprawl.  The entire British countryside is one big patriotic symbol.  Jerusalem is England's unofficial anthem:

 

And did those feet in ancient time 
Walk upon England's mountains green? 
And was the holy Lamb of God 
On England's pleasant pastures seen?

And did the Countenance Divine 
Shine forth upon our clouded hills? 
And was Jerusalem builded here 
Among these dark Satanic Mills?

Bring me my bow of burning gold! 
Bring me my arrows of desire! 
Bring me my spear! O clouds, unfold! 
Bring me my chariot of fire!

I will not cease from mental fight, 
Nor shall my sword sleep in my hand, 
Till we have built Jerusalem
In England's green and pleasant land

 

 


Edited by Laura Corin, 21 April 2017 - 04:29 PM.

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#58 wonderchica

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Posted 21 April 2017 - 04:31 PM

Lots of people have American flags where I live. Lots of stores and business as well. When I used to live in the country/Appalachian Mountain foothills (in the South), there were also some Confederate flags in one way or another.
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#59 Paige

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Posted 21 April 2017 - 05:12 PM

It is very common here to have a flag outside your house. US flags are the most common, but you'll also see state flags, flags for college or professional sports teams, and international flags. They are ubiquitous. My DH is military and likes to fly a flag. We've done it in the past but we don't have one now. We have lived in several US states and traveled to many others and it seems to be common everywhere, but much more common in areas with lots of retired or active military.


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#60 Sadie

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Posted 21 April 2017 - 05:20 PM

Where I am, you will see private citizens maybe with an AU flag on AU day. Although often it will be the Southern Cross flag, which is a lovely flag,  sadly co-opted by pro-white, anti-Muslim groups.

 

Most public buildings - but not libraries! - will have the AU flag and the Aboriginal flag, sometimes the state flag also.

 

Around Olympics time, there are a lot of little green and yellow boxing kangaroo flags around.

 

I actually learned proper flag protocol, as my primary school was big on raising, lowering and folding the flag properly, and we all took turns being flag monitor. Of course, 15 years ago, I took dd out of school partly due to the excessive veneration of the flag at her school (Excessive to me, probably not to anyone else.) My nephew's school doesn't have any flag ceremony at all - also a public school. It seems to vary depending on the principal.

 

~

 

That's super interesting, about the increase in households displaying a flag after 9/11.

 

 


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#61 Arcadia

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Posted 21 April 2017 - 05:41 PM

I actually learned proper flag protocol, as my primary school was big on raising, lowering and folding the flag properly, and we all took turns being flag monitor.


For my government aided convent primary school, brownies were the colour party and in charge of flag raising and flag lowering. Cub scouts were in charge at the Catholic all boys primary school my cousins and nephews attended.

Secondary school (7th-10th) had girl guides and boy scouts on colour party duty. The girl guides coy (company) I was in even made a flag pole out of wooden staff for Thinking Day as the girl guides flag gets hoisted as well as the national flag and school flag. My school only had two flag poles so we had to make a temporary third one out of wood staff.

Junior College (11th & 12th) had student volunteers for flag raising and lowering.
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#62 whitehawk

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Posted 21 April 2017 - 06:42 PM

I'm in the southeastern US. Most government buildings and some stores (such as car dealerships) fly the US and state flags every day--all the libraries, for instance, except storefront ones. Private homes occasionally fly one or the other... I think for Independence Day you might see as many as 5% of houses flying the US flag, maybe a few more. On a regular day, looking at homes or cars, you're just as likely to see the flag for the local hockey team, or one of the three nearby universities' mascots (college sports are a big deal here).

 

Typical public school classrooms have a US flag and have the kids recite the pledge of allegiance daily. It's also part of scout meetings.

 

Occasionally some pickup truck sports both the US *and* Confederate flags, leading me to grumble about picking a team, dummy.

 

My church has a rainbow flag outside. If there's a state or national flag around somewhere, I haven't noticed it.


Edited by whitehawk, 21 April 2017 - 06:45 PM.

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#63 lllllll

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Posted 21 April 2017 - 07:19 PM

nm


Edited by _ -_-, 07 May 2017 - 06:25 PM.

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#64 SusanC

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Posted 21 April 2017 - 07:31 PM

Is this a good place to bring out the article about why every state flag is wrong? Looking at it can offer some clues about why some state flags are more commonly flown than others.

https://www.google.c...nd-here-is-why/
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#65 Farrar

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Posted 21 April 2017 - 08:25 PM

At school and in Scouts we learned flag etiquette; it drives me nuts when flags are left up 24/7 or flown in tatters.

 

So, dh inadvertently started an odd project that has only had a few targets... but he now points it out to organizations when this has happened. There was a school in our 'hood that had a flag that slowly went from bad to worse over the course of a couple of *years* and it was driving dh a little crazy. So finally he looked up the principal's email and sent a thing where he was like, look, I know you're a struggling school and have other concerns, and I'm not trying to be nasty, but this just looks bad. You should just take it down. It was down the next day. So the other day we spotted a theater we spotted that seems to have another - only about a third of the flag is left, the rest has disintegrated. He was like, maybe I'll shoot them an email...


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#66 jen3kids

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Posted 21 April 2017 - 08:53 PM

I live in Maryland and there are tons of US flags in my area.  My son's Christian middle school had the 8th graders put the flag up every morning and taken down and properly folded at the end of the school day.  They never flew the flag in bad weather.  

 

As a few other Marylanders have said, MD flag swag is very popular here - my kids all have some sort of it - socks, shorts, hoodies, t-shirts, laynards, etc. The strangest thing is that there is also MD flag swag in Orioles' and Ravens' colours.

 

As a total aside, I have a pet peeve regarding the MD flag - many folks don't know how to properly fly it.  It's not obvious, like most flags.  And, even some of the swag is incorrect.  The black square is supposed to be in the top left corner of the flag.   I'm not even a native Marylander and I realized, just while driving around, that the flag was being flown differently and then my sons' Scout Master talked about it one night and explained the correct way to fly the MD flag.   Now I really want to bang on people's front door and educate them, but I'm too chicken :)

 

 


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#67 Garga

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Posted 21 April 2017 - 09:09 PM

~

That's super interesting, about the increase in households displaying a flag after 9/11.

Oh, we all got super patriotic after 911. A building in my complex of building where I worked got a flag that was about 5 stories tall and as wide as the building and displayed it on the side of their building.

On the evening of 911 Congress stood on the steps of the capitol and spontaneously burst into singing God Bless America. https://m.youtube.co...h?v=Izb459vJ-8Q

American flag suppliers ran out of flags. People had to wait for more flags to be made and brought to the stores. When we say flags were everywhere, they were EVERYwhere. If you've ever thought Americans are all "U!S!A!" Or "'Merica!" then you wouldn't be able to believe what it was like after 911. Everyone was hopping mad, deeply depressed, and in love with America like they'd never been before.

Well, at least around here they were. There are a few hundred bridges over the Baltimore beltway and 9 out of 10 of them had flags plastered all over them, not to mention all the homes and businesses that put them out.

Many businesses sent everyone home for the rest of the day on 911 because no one could work. And when we came back to work the next day, my company had a moment of silence for us all to pray or meditate on what had happened. No one got any work done on 9/12.

It was quite a thing to see.

Edited by Garga, 21 April 2017 - 09:10 PM.

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#68 bibiche

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Posted 21 April 2017 - 09:21 PM

Where I live there aren't many. The only people who have them are the same people who had Trump signs. Typically on the 4th of July more people put them out. Sometimes on Memorial Day too, I think, but otherwise we are spared them.


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#69 Lakeside

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Posted 21 April 2017 - 09:50 PM

Not as many where we currently live as some other locations have had.
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#70 justasque

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Posted 21 April 2017 - 10:17 PM

I live in Maryland and there are tons of US flags in my area. My son's Christian middle school had the 8th graders put the flag up every morning and taken down and properly folded at the end of the school day. They never flew the flag in bad weather.

As a few other Marylanders have said, MD flag swag is very popular here - my kids all have some sort of it - socks, shorts, hoodies, t-shirts, laynards, etc. The strangest thing is that there is also MD flag swag in Orioles' and Ravens' colours.

As a total aside, I have a pet peeve regarding the MD flag - many folks don't know how to properly fly it. It's not obvious, like most flags. And, even some of the swag is incorrect. The black square is supposed to be in the top left corner of the flag. I'm not even a native Marylander and I realized, just while driving around, that the flag was being flown differently and then my sons' Scout Master talked about it one night and explained the correct way to fly the MD flag. Now I really want to bang on people's front door and educate them, but I'm too chicken :)


I have a similar story. When I was a teen we visited a museum during a family trip. They had a Union Jack that had been captured by the US in some battle or other, bullet holes and all. It was mounted in a fancy protected case made specially for it at no small expense. One of my parents pointed out to the docent that it had been mounted upside down. The docent wasn't having any if it, and insisted that it would look the same the other way up so it didn't matter. Dad gave up, but he was right though - if you look carefully, it is not a reversible design. Once you've seen it, you realize how much of Union Jack swag gets it wrong.


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#71 Word Nerd

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Posted 21 April 2017 - 11:42 PM

My daughters' school puts up and takes down the flag every day. That's the norm at schools in our area, whether public or private.
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#72 AimeeM

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Posted 21 April 2017 - 11:59 PM

I'm in the south. It's very common here. Many of the homes in our subdivision fly USA flags outside. We have one, actually, but haven't put it up yet. 


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#73 Laura in CA

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Posted 22 April 2017 - 12:59 AM

People around here fly flags mostly on patriotic holidays, such as Independence Day, Flag Day, Memorial Day, etc.

Our next-door neighbor is a WWII vet and he flies his flag more often.

On the Fourth of July I used to display my grandfather's flag with 48 stars (in nice orderly rows :) ), but it's fairly delicate, plus my husband is afraid someone might steal it.

ETA: What we see fairly often is people displaying flags of places they've lived or places they're from. When we lived in Europe an Australian friend had the Australian flag on the wall inside his apartment (to kid him, my husband always asked him why he had a NZ flag LOL). I think people get more patriotic or at least more nostalgic when they are far from home, and a flag is a convenient way to indicate where you're from. Now that we're back in the USA, we're more likely to display a flag from one of the countries where we've lived, or the country my dad emigrated from. In my son's dorm, some of the students had various flags hanging on their walls - a Greek flag for a boy whose parents are from Greece; the flag of Chile for a boy who spent a summer there; etc.

I had forgotten this – when I lived in Germany, I spent a lot of time hunting for a German flag to take home with me, without success. Finally my landlady suggested boat-supply stores, as the only people she knew with German flags had them to fly from the back of their boats.

Edited by Laura in CA, 22 April 2017 - 01:08 AM.

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#74 creekland

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Posted 22 April 2017 - 05:05 PM

Like pretty much everyone has said, US flags are pretty common (but not the majority of households) in our area of PA.  Confederate flags can be common too and you have to know the owner to know whether that is due to siding with the South in the Civil War and not wanting that distinction lost (Gettysburg is close) or whether it's due to anger at current political correctness.  It's about a 50/50 split from what I've seen - except when on pickup trucks - then it's the latter.

 

My Mom lives on the Canadian border of NYS.  There US flags are common too, but not nearly as many Confederate flags (there are a few).  Some families have mixed nationality marriages and/or relatives and opt to fly both the US and Canadian flags.  Some businesses fly both too.  Across the river, Canadian flags are just as popular there as US flags are here.  There's really no difference that I can tell in "numbers."

 

In PA, I've yet to see a Canadian flag flown.  One company nearby flies the German flag all the time (along with the US flag), but they are also German owned.

 

Middle son's college in NY has a Commons area (indoors) where they fly the flag of every nation they have current students from.  That's impressive to look at - literally oodles of flags - and to practice my flag recognition with.  I'll be doing that a little more this evening actually.


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#75 maize

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Posted 22 April 2017 - 05:48 PM

Is this a good place to bring out the article about why every state flag is wrong? Looking at it can offer some clues about why some state flags are more commonly flown than others.

https://www.google.c...nd-here-is-why/


Oh my goodness that made me laugh harder than I have laughed in a long time!
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#76 okbud

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Posted 22 April 2017 - 07:11 PM

I forgot about being flag monitor! We did that too.

There are also flags at almost all ballparks and people are forever singing the Star spangled banner. I don't think I've ever not teared up at it, either. And I still love the ceremonies around the flags at every military installation and ship, though I imagine it gets old for the ppl that actually have to schlep it up and down and fold it and salute it all the time.
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#77 AnthemLights

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Posted 22 April 2017 - 07:15 PM

Is this a good place to bring out the article about why every state flag is wrong? Looking at it can offer some clues about why some state flags are more commonly flown than others.

https://www.google.c...nd-here-is-why/

 

This made me laugh as well.  I was smiling the whole why through and then got to Virginia.....

 

"Just when I thought it couldn’t get worse, Virginia happened. Virginia, do you know there’s a dead guy on your flag? “Yeah,” Virginia says, shrugging nonchalantly. “That’s what we do to tyrants here. Kill them, and then we pose for pictures on their corpses.” Don’t mess with Virginia."


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#78 IsabelC

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Posted 23 April 2017 - 06:43 AM

Very rare here. Most flags are on official buildings, not private homes. If I see a house with a flag on display, I'd assume they are weird / scary / redneck or something people. Except on Australia Day when there are flags everywhere, but even then, they are more little ones to hold / wave, and flag themed accessories, rather than actual flags.


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#79 OneStepAtATime

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Posted 23 April 2017 - 08:43 AM

U.S. flags, Texas flags, Mexican flag, POW/MIA flags and sometimes some other random flag are seen fairly commonly here. I'm in Texas but a more liberal pocket of Texas. Lots of schools private and public fly the US flag and some fly the state flag.
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#80 ktgrok

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Posted 23 April 2017 - 12:21 PM

Our local newspaper had a flag printed on one page so you could cut it out and put it in your window, if you didn't have another flag to fly. There were in nearly every window in the city. 

 

This house came with a flag pole mounted on an outside wall, so we did put up a flag when we moved in. An all weather one, and there is lighting on the garage so it was lit at night. However, after a recent political event we were feeling pretty upset with our country, and DH took it down in frustration one morning. We haven't replaced it yet, but imagine we will soon. 

Oh, we all got super patriotic after 911. A building in my complex of building where I worked got a flag that was about 5 stories tall and as wide as the building and displayed it on the side of their building.

On the evening of 911 Congress stood on the steps of the capitol and spontaneously burst into singing God Bless America. https://m.youtube.co...h?v=Izb459vJ-8Q

American flag suppliers ran out of flags. People had to wait for more flags to be made and brought to the stores. When we say flags were everywhere, they were EVERYwhere. If you've ever thought Americans are all "U!S!A!" Or "'Merica!" then you wouldn't be able to believe what it was like after 911. Everyone was hopping mad, deeply depressed, and in love with America like they'd never been before.

Well, at least around here they were. There are a few hundred bridges over the Baltimore beltway and 9 out of 10 of them had flags plastered all over them, not to mention all the homes and businesses that put them out.

Many businesses sent everyone home for the rest of the day on 911 because no one could work. And when we came back to work the next day, my company had a moment of silence for us all to pray or meditate on what had happened. No one got any work done on 9/12.

It was quite a thing to see.

 


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#81 Pam in CT

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Posted 23 April 2017 - 12:27 PM

OK Sadie this thread has sparked a flag question of my own -- are rainbow flags A Thing in Australia?  

 

I've never really thought this through before, but I think I could if pressed make a case that in the US, rainbow flags have emerged as something of a counter-symbol to the Confederate.  Hard to imagine an individual household or a church or an organization flying the two together.



#82 OneStepAtATime

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Posted 23 April 2017 - 12:33 PM

I guess rainbow flags haven't made it to my area. What are rainbow flags?

#83 Paige

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Posted 23 April 2017 - 12:44 PM

I guess rainbow flags haven't made it to my area. What are rainbow flags?

 

I think they are for LBGQT support? Or maybe these days more about an overall unity, acceptance and peace for all kind of thing.


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#84 Arcadia

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Posted 23 April 2017 - 12:51 PM

I guess rainbow flags haven't made it to my area. What are rainbow flags?


In support of LGBT. They are common in San Francisco.

"In 1974, Baker’s life changed forever when he met Harvey Milk, who showed him “how action could create change.” Three years after they met, Milk was elected to the San Francisco Board of Supervisors – making him the first openly gay person to hold a high public office in a major American city. Milk, once known fondly as the Mayor of Castro St., had campaigned on a positive message of hope for young gay people, saying, “The only thing they have to look forward to is hope. And you have to give them hope.” After winning the election, Milk challenged Gilbert Baker to come up with a symbol of pride for the gay community – a positive alternative to the pink triangle. The pink triangle, once imposed by Nazis to identify and persecute homosexuals, had been reclaimed in the 70s as a bold symbol of remembrance and action against persecution. It is still widely used, often alongside or superimposed upon the Rainbow Flag.

Inspired, Baker began working on a flag. He dyed the fabrics himself and, with the help of volunteers, stitched together eight strips of brilliant color into a huge banner that spoke volumes: hot pink stood for sexuality, red for life, orange for healing, yellow for the sun, green for nature, turquoise blue for art, indigo for harmony and violet for spirit." http://www.sftravel....ry-rainbow-flag
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#85 Kalmia

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Posted 23 April 2017 - 02:06 PM

Within my usual driving radius there is one house flying an American flag and a Patriots (football team) flag and one house with a Confederate flag even though we are in one of the northernmost states. Around the Fourth of July there will be a blooming of flags everywhere. I want an Earth flag, but I have never shelled out the dough for one.


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#86 Sadie

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Posted 23 April 2017 - 04:17 PM

OK Sadie this thread has sparked a flag question of my own -- are rainbow flags A Thing in Australia?  

 

I've never really thought this through before, but I think I could if pressed make a case that in the US, rainbow flags have emerged as something of a counter-symbol to the Confederate.  Hard to imagine an individual household or a church or an organization flying the two together.

 

Like LBGT rainbow flags ? Well, you see them as a symbol and at rallies and such - but not really flown on a flagpole outside people's homes, kwim ?

 

 


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#87 Pam in CT

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Posted 23 April 2017 - 04:24 PM

Like LBGT rainbow flags ? Well, you see them as a symbol and at rallies and such - but not really flown on a flagpole outside people's homes, kwim ?

 

Here they started at parades as well... then they started showing up at progressive churches to signal "you're welcome here"... and moved on from there -- on the doors of faculty offices on campuses, etc.  In my area they're fairly common hung from flagpoles on individual residences, though not as common as the US flag.  The meaning may perhaps have widened a bit as well -- the LBGT support association is definitely still a component, but the signaling may now be a bit broader, all are welcome here.

 

We're a flag-hangin' culture I guess, lol.


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#88 Audrey

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Posted 23 April 2017 - 04:35 PM

Canada.  Extremely uncommon here.  Flags are only at public buildings/spaces.  I can't recall ever seeing one at a person's home here.


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#89 eternalsummer

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Posted 23 April 2017 - 07:31 PM

I just had a realization.

 

So one of the things we sell is labels with your country's flag on them and then care and content information (so like flag, handmade in USA, 100% Cotton, hand wash warm, whatever etc.)  I made samples and had them photographed with lots of different flags, of course, to appeal to buyers from everywhere, but probably 98% of orders we get through this listing are from the US (but more like 10% of our general orders are international).  Furthermore, there are lots of labels on Etsy and the wider internet with US flags on them, so I thought that our international flags option was unique and would sell the listing.

 

But hardly anyone from overseas (or even Canada - especially Canada!) buys the darned thing!

 

I realized just now that is because I'd projected American obsession with the flag onto other countries, haha.


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#90 creekland

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Posted 23 April 2017 - 07:45 PM

Canada.  Extremely uncommon here.  Flags are only at public buildings/spaces.  I can't recall ever seeing one at a person's home here.

 

I'm curious as to where in Canada.  I'm used to seeing them in southern Ontario - from Ottawa down to the St Lawrence River, and then over at Niagara - and again, there they are as common as US flags are in NY.  They aren't found at the majority of houses in either country, but several houses have them.

 

It's been a few years since we've been to Quebec or the Maritimes.  I can't say I recall seeing them there (wasn't paying attention TBH), but those other places we get to more than once per year...


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#91 Laura Corin

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Posted 10 June 2017 - 11:12 AM

I saw a flag!

 

Ever since this thread was started, I've been watching out for flags in my area of Scotland.  I haven't travelled far from home, but I haven't seen any (either UK or Scottish) outside any home or government building since then, even though we just endured another General Election.  Here are some pictures of polling stations - no flags.  

 

https://www.theguard...ons-in-pictures

 

Until today, when I saw a Union flag flying outside a Royal British Legion hall

 

http://www.britishlegion.org.uk/

 

By chance, I haven't recently driven past our nearest armed forces base, but I just checked Google Streetview, and there wasn't a flag flying the day the photo was taken.

 

British people are pretty patriotic.  We just don't do flags much.


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#92 Homeschool Mom in AZ

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Posted 10 June 2017 - 01:37 PM

My neighborhood was completed in 2003.  It has 2,000 single family homes on 1100 acres. Typical SW suburban neighborhood. 

Only a handful of houses in my neighborhood fly an American flag regularly.  On patriotic holidays they would be more common. I would say that's true of the area in general. I don't think I've ever seen the state flag flying anywhere other than a state building.  Most people who live here are from other states or countries, so that burning love for the state you live in thing is kind of foreign here.

The last neighborhood I Iived in (within 10 miles, same kind of suburban neighborhood built a couple of years before this one) had an HOA that put up a row of flags at the entrances on all patriotic holidays.

Someone around here drives a big white pick up with 2 American flags on it, but that's very unusual.

My daughter's Tae Kwon Do school has a S. Korean flag and an American flag hanging on the front wall.  Here master was born and raised in S. Korea.  His wife was raised in NY.  It's customary for all the children and the master to bow to the flags at the beginning and ending of the class.  He explains that they bow to the S. Korean flag out of respect because TKD is a Korean martial art.  They bow to the American flag out of respect for their country.  At big events they bow to the flags and someone sings each national anthem.


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#93 Farrar

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Posted 10 June 2017 - 03:37 PM

A lot of extra flags up in my neighborhood this week... but the were mostly rainbow flags for pride.
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#94 seekinghim45

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Posted 10 June 2017 - 04:01 PM

Very common here.  We have a flagpole with a Texas and US Flag on it.  For national holidays ( Flag Day, Memorial Day, etc., some organization lines our city streets with American Flags.  They then take them up a few days later.  It is pretty cool. 



#95 Laura Corin

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Posted 10 June 2017 - 04:07 PM

 It is pretty cool. 

 

I'm not being at all snarky or critical, but I don't understand the culture.  Are flags aesthetically pleasing?  Does it make you feel good inside (patriotic or proud of your country)?  Is there nostalgia?  Are you pleased with people for flying the flags?  Something else?


Edited by Laura Corin, 10 June 2017 - 04:08 PM.

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#96 seekinghim45

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Posted 10 June 2017 - 04:09 PM

I'm not being at all snarky or critical, but I don't understand the culture.  Are flags aesthetically pleasing?  Does it make you feel good inside (patriotic or proud of your country)?  Is there nostalgia?  Are you pleased with people for flying the flags?  Something else?

 

Yes, they look great.  It does make me feel good inside.  It shows support for our country I guess.  I don't know.  It is why I tear up every time the national anthem is played, especially during the Olympics. 


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#97 seekinghim45

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Posted 10 June 2017 - 04:15 PM

Another thing is that many times patriotism is linked to faith.  Our patriotic service the weekend of July 4th drives my middle one batty.  He hates it. I don't blame him.  To me, they shouldn't be linked.  But one reason we lost a pastor was because he refused to honor military and have a patriotic service.  Our older people are pretty adamant about that.  So we march in the flags, recognize the various branches of military.  We sing the National Anthem, Battle Hymn of the Republic and other patriotic songs.  I normally have the children's choir sing something. But the pastor and my middle son are right, it has nothing to do with Christ. But it is tradition.  And tradition is strong here.  Many of our members fought in WWII and Korea. 



#98 Farrar

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Posted 10 June 2017 - 04:33 PM

I'm not being at all snarky or critical, but I don't understand the culture.  Are flags aesthetically pleasing?  Does it make you feel good inside (patriotic or proud of your country)?  Is there nostalgia?  Are you pleased with people for flying the flags?  Something else?

 

Since most of the flags I see flown here are DC flags, I usually take it as a political statement in support of our rights being trampled. That's certainly why we fly it. 

 

When Marylanders fly their flag, I assume it's an aesthetic statement, because the Maryland flag is cool. They put it on everything. And no wonder. It's the coolest state flag. Just like North Carolina has the coolest state motto.

 

The American flag... yeah, nostalgia, patriotism, pride in country... It's just so ubiquitous I don't think people notice it. I think it's common in some areas because being lucky enough to have been born in the US is one of the better things people have to hold on to in their lives.


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#99 Caroline

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Posted 10 June 2017 - 04:37 PM

Since most of the flags I see flown here are DC flags, I usually take it as a political statement in support of our rights being trampled. That's certainly why we fly it.

When Marylanders fly their flag, I assume it's an aesthetic statement, because the Maryland flag is cool. They put it on everything. And no wonder. It's the coolest state flag. Just like North Carolina has the coolest state motto.

The American flag... yeah, nostalgia, patriotism, pride in country... It's just so ubiquitous I don't think people notice it. I think it's common in some areas because being lucky enough to have been born in the US is one of the better things people have to hold on to in their lives.


We Marylanders put our flag on everything. I have a magnet on my car in the shape of a crab with the flag on it, and i haven't lived in Maryland for 25 years.
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#100 Spy Car

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Posted 10 June 2017 - 04:53 PM

I must live in the "other American" as here in Los Angeles US flags are pretty uncommon on homes. The few homes that sport them generally have an RV parked in front and you can guess what's inside.

 

I'd did get the kiddo (by request) a California Republic water polo speedo.

 

Bill