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Has anyone used Corrective Reading?


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#1 Lecka

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Posted 19 April 2017 - 10:44 AM

I am wondering if anyone can tell me about Corrective Reading?

 

Here is what I know -- I have heard really good things about this program for autism for reading comprehension.  But I have only heard that very vaguely!

 

My son will be in the recommended age range (3rd grade and up) next year and I am wondering if it might be appropriate for him now. 


Edited by Lecka, 19 April 2017 - 10:45 AM.


#2 MistyMountain

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Posted 19 April 2017 - 02:44 PM

I was wondering the same thing but did not get many replies.

Edited by MistyMountain, 19 April 2017 - 02:45 PM.


#3 Lecka

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Posted 19 April 2017 - 03:10 PM

Well, my son has used Reading Mastery so I know a bit about it! It includes some comprehension and it was good for my son (very basic).

The presentation books for it are $$$ but we (my son did it with a tutor) had access to the presentation books through school... but we have moved now.

I got some of the materials from Amazon for decent prices. For whatever reason it is an older edition that was used, so I got that edition.

Edit: I mean I know how the comprehension questions are in the RM materials I have seen. They are from the same company.

Edited by Lecka, 19 April 2017 - 03:13 PM.


#4 bluebonnetgirl

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Posted 20 April 2017 - 11:03 PM

I've used Corrective Reading Comprehension and can attest that it was easy to use and very effective. Thinking of returning to it at the next level up soon.

#5 Lecka

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Posted 21 April 2017 - 02:04 AM

Great!

Do you get the teacher book or just student workbooks? Where do you purchase?

#6 Grover

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Posted 21 April 2017 - 02:07 AM

I have used corrective reading with multiple children over many years as a teacher and tutor.  It is a powerful learning tool.  There are placement tests to see if the child is ready for it.



#7 Lecka

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Posted 21 April 2017 - 10:51 AM

I looked at the placement tests, thanks for the idea.

It looks like maybe a little more in the future for my son, but we are covering quite a few things from Level A in other ways, so that is good to see.

#8 Canadian Mom of 2

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Posted 21 April 2017 - 11:37 AM

Here it says that it is typically taught to children in grades 4 and up. That’s another reason you might not be seeing the level of readiness, yet.

https://www.nifdi.or...rective-reading

#9 Lecka

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Posted 21 April 2017 - 12:30 PM

I looked at that, and it looks like he would place into Language for Thinking now, and it is for a younger age -- so I am going to look more at that.

#10 Canadian Mom of 2

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Posted 21 April 2017 - 02:20 PM

For what it's worth, the samples seem like things you could do yourself. I totally get wanting more guidance to achieve a more targeted approach, though!

#11 Lecka

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Posted 21 April 2017 - 03:37 PM

I will see how much it costs ;)
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#12 Lecka

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Posted 22 April 2017 - 04:35 AM

I am looking at Critical Thinking Company now..... Language for Thinking looks much more expensive than Corrective Reading. And I do think my son is already covering about half the material from Language for Thinking in other ways.
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#13 Canadian Mom of 2

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Posted 22 April 2017 - 09:07 AM

Awesome! Thanks for reminding me too. We just got my son's disability approved for the next three years and I have been looking for materials that will be beneficial to him. I haven't looked at the CTC for several years now. I am thinking of these 3 (there's overlap between the first two, which I'm totally fine with). I'll compare them some more when I have some time to sit at the computer. Some will be just review, other areas we need to work on. I would rather start here though and then move up from there.

http://www.criticalt...ls-level-1.html

http://www.criticalt...y-concepts.html

http://www.criticalt...ts-level-c.html

What are you looking at?

I also use Houghton Mifflin's old reading program that my son really likes. Here's one of our books but there's no preview.

https://www.amazon.c...6ZGJ9NWQEZAVTRK

You might be able to find some preview pages by Googling. My 13 yr old did Calvert in 3rd grade, which is how I found out about them. I have the books up to 4th grade. Both my two loved them and they helped my 13 yr old with inferring and some other skills that were a bit more of a weakness for him than his younger brother. I paid more for them being in Canada but you can find them for a lot less.

#14 Lecka

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Posted 22 April 2017 - 10:48 AM

I am looking at the Kindergarten level for my 2nd grader. I was asking him last night about same and different and he was having a hard time. Then some things he would be able to do easily. So I think it would be a good mix for him. But I am not sure!

Right now I am doing AAR Level 1 and Reflex Math, and I would possibly like to get back to Saxon math.

We have moved recently and I am still figuring out what to supplement at home.... and then I am also looking for summer.

I would love to hear what you pick and how it goes!

#15 Canadian Mom of 2

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Posted 22 April 2017 - 03:13 PM

Certainly :) I am having difficulty finding the books without shipping, so I might just buy the ebooks and print off as we go. When I can sit at a computer I can look at them a bit better.

My 13 yr old always liked Revenge of the Riddle Spiders but I can't remember what other CTC products we have used.

Could you link the book? Are you comfortable with me making some suggestions on the same different?

What level Saxon?

I don't have much time at the moment but I will say that I actually like Saxon. I am using Singapore Primary Digital with my 8 yr old but used Saxon for my 13 yr old last year and was really happy with the program, for him.

#16 Canadian Mom of 2

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Posted 22 April 2017 - 03:25 PM

I found you something from Temple Grandin (I used this approach with my 13 yr old waaaay back, long before we knew anything about autism).

See if this makes sense for your boy. The quote came from here:
http://www.grandin.c...l.thinking.html

"Categories are the beginning of concept formation. Nancy Minshew found that people with autism can easily sort objects into categories such as red or blue, but they have difficulty thinking up new categories for groups of common objects. If I put a variety of common things on a table such as staplers, pencils, books, an envelope, a clock, hats, golf balls, and a tennis racquet, and asked an individual with autism to pick out objects containing paper, they could do it. However, they often have difficulty when asked to make tip new categories. Teachers should work on teaching flexibility of thinking by playing a game where the autistic individual is asked to make up new categories for the objects like objects containing metal, or objects used in sports. Then the teacher should get the person to explain the reason for putting an object in a specific category."

I started my son off back then with these. He was 7 at the time.
http://m.lakeshorele...uct_code=LC1668

We then progressed to objects we could find around the house, like Temple Grandin suggests. Making groups and categorizing helps build focus on other features, besides the basic things like color. The counters we used were perfect because there are several ways you can group them.

I jumped the gun with the suggestions, so just ignore if it doesn't apply to your son ;)

Edited by Canadian Mom of 2, 22 April 2017 - 03:26 PM.


#17 Canadian Mom of 2

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Posted 22 April 2017 - 08:20 PM

The CTC books I linked, many of their pages have a high color saturation. They would be too costly to print on my AIO printer. I found them from Rainbow Resource though and I am adding them to next school year's list of materials. I'll be placing that in a couple of months. This means it will be a while before I have something useful to share, but I'll try to remember to post how they are working out for us when we have them and have been using them for a while. 



#18 Lecka

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Posted 23 April 2017 - 06:57 AM

He has done a lot of "feature, function, and class." But he has done a lot where he has a picture to look at.

I think I need to go back to doing it with a picture, and then ask the same question with no picture.

I was looking at Building Thinking Skills, but I need to look more.

But thinking about it -- I think he can do more with pictures and then I need to make sure to go to where he is thinking of things and comparing them without a picture to look at.

On Saxon -- his teacher had end-of-year tests and end-of-semester tests.

He passed the end-of-Kindergarten test well, but got a 50 or 60% on the middle-of-1st grade
test.

So she suggested to start at the beginning of the 1st grade book.

But now I have moved and am still figuring things out with the new school, and figuring out what I will supplement and what my priorities are.

He does very well with Reflex Math, so I am satisfied with him doing that for now -- but depending on what I find out about his school math, I will see what I think.

I know Saxon works for him, though. It is a consistent format from day to day, and it has built-in review.

He was forgetting things before, so he needs either review or something with built-in review.

#19 Canadian Mom of 2

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Posted 23 April 2017 - 11:40 AM

I think in this case you could look at his ability to visualize. It comes more naturally to some kids with ASD (my 8 yr old is that way) but not as much with others. My 13 yr old I had to build on visualization skills. This is why I have always focused on providing hands on materials, with both. I have made sure to provide them with a large visual library of objects and experiences. Abstract concepts for some people on the spectrum are often linked to personal experiences or images. Temple Grandin attached images. My 8 yr old could do that at a younger age than his brother could. 13 yr old is also my boy that struggles with some EFs. In his case, his working memory is good but he struggles with attention some (as described in the link) and a bit with mental flexibility. Here's a link:

https://www.kennedyk...cutive-function

8 yr old has a heavy dose of "H" from ADHD. So, while he grasps concepts quickly, getting him to stay on task is another story. We have decided not to use meds so I just work with it. We do what we have to do.

I really liked the Building Thinking Skills! That one is at the top of my list. I have now set aside to look at some for my 13 yr old as well.

I started my 8 yr old with review on Singapore Primary Digital as well, which was why I asked. I want to ensure he has no gaps and there are areas where the review will definitely benefit him. I don't care about rushing him through. He is a mathy kid. I just need to build on his focus level.

If Reflex Math is providing the review your son needs, perhaps you don't have to go all the way back to the beginning of Saxon 1! Saxon has tons of built in review though, so if Saxon is the better fit, perhaps you should put more emphasis there.

Edited by Canadian Mom of 2, 24 April 2017 - 10:18 AM.