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Book a Week 2017 - BW16: Homonym and Synonym


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#151 Jane in NC

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Posted 22 April 2017 - 08:44 AM

Congratulations Heather on reaching 52! Impressive! :001_smile:


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#152 Kareni

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Posted 22 April 2017 - 11:10 AM

A one day only currently free classic for Kindle readers ~

 

A Room with a View by E. M. Forster

 

"One of English literature’s most inspiring love stories

Lucy Honeychurch is a young woman torn between the opposing values of gray old England and vibrant Italy in this unforgettable story of romance and rebellion. On a trip to Florence with her older cousin and chaperone, Lucy becomes enchanted by a freedom unlike any she has known at home. The excitement she feels when she is with George Emerson, a fellow boarder at the Pension Bertolini, is as exhilarating as it is confusing, and their intoxicating kiss in a field of violets threatens to turn her whole world upside down. Back at Windy Corner, her family’s Surrey estate, Lucy must finally decide if the power of passion is greater than the force of expectation.

Widely recognized as one of the finest novels of the twentieth century, A Room with a View is E. M. Forster’s most hopeful work and a truly timeless romance."

 

Regards,

Kareni


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#153 Penguin

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Posted 22 April 2017 - 02:13 PM

Since I lived in Denmark from 2011 til 2016, I feel like I should contribute something to the hygge discussion, lol.

 

Let's see...

 

Hygge is a noun (en hygge) or a verb (at hygge). The adjective form (hyggelig or hyggeligt) is actually used more often.

 

en hyggelig aften: an evening with hygge

et hyggeligt sommerhus. a summerhouse with hygge

 

Det var meget hyggeligt: It was very cozy

(cozy being only an approximate translation)

 

You could use Google images with "hyggeligt sommerhus" to get an idea of hygge in the Danish summer. Granted, summer in Denmark is never actually HOT!!

 


Edited by Penguin, 22 April 2017 - 02:20 PM.

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#154 Stacia

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Posted 22 April 2017 - 05:03 PM

I finished Lincoln in the Bardo by George Saunders last night.

 

29906980.jpg

 

It's a round robin format/presentation of storytelling, most of it being snippets -- whether quotes from various historical documents or an overlapping cacophony of voices from various characters (most being dead & in the bardo, the intermediate state between death & rebirth). The central storyline centers on the death of Willie, Lincoln's son, & his arrival at the bardo, as well as the grieving Lincoln does over his son (which the story further expands to cover the grief of the loss of life during the Civil War, as well the personal losses that are common to all humanity).

 

Because of the overlapping quote style of writing, it is relatively speedy to read. It alternates between serious, vulgar, funny, sad, touching, sweet, hopeful, depressing, irreverent, & thoughtful.

 

I was pulled in & read it in just two sittings. I normally enjoy off-beat storytelling & would file this book under that category. Since it is getting quite a bit of press coverage & has a decent holds list at the library, I would be curious to hear what others think. I'm wondering if people who enjoy more traditional storytelling would like this one or not; it's hard for me to guess. It's a novel (a first from short-story writer Saunders) that doesn't really feel like a novel.

 

I like the NY Times review of it as I think it does a good job of describing the book.


Edited by Stacia, 22 April 2017 - 05:04 PM.

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#155 Kareni

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Posted 22 April 2017 - 09:25 PM

A currently free urban fantasy book that looks intriguing ~

 

Shadow Born: an Urban Fantasy Novel (Shadows of Salem Book 1) by Jasmine Walt

 

"Chicago Police Detective Brooke Chandler is keeping a secret… and if she’s not careful, it could get her killed.

Brooke is no stranger to the supernatural. In Chicago, vampires are just as prevalent as drug lords, and infinitely more bloodthirsty. So when her partner and fiancé dies in a mysterious fire while chasing down a lead in Salem, she suspects something dark and otherworldly is at play.

Blessed with the ability to see into the past by touching inanimate objects, Brooke transfers to the Salem PD, hoping her talent will help her get to the bottom of things. Between dodging assassination attempts and being stonewalled at every turn, the going is tough. Add in a mysterious fae club owner with secrets of his own and a personal grudge against her, and it becomes nearly impossible.

If Brooke wants to play in the supernatural sandbox, she’s going to have to roll up her sleeves and get dirty. But how many people will have to die for Brooke to discover the truth about her fiance? And is she even ready to know?"

**

 

Some spoons for readers ~

 

one

 

two

 

There needs to be a spoon for people like me who drink hot chocolate!  Okay, I'll settle for these.

 

Regards,

Kareni


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#156 Mothersweets

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Posted 22 April 2017 - 11:15 PM

I finished Lincoln in the Bardo by George Saunders last night.

 

29906980.jpg

 

It's a round robin format/presentation of storytelling, most of it being snippets -- whether quotes from various historical documents or an overlapping cacophony of voices from various characters (most being dead & in the bardo, the intermediate state between death & rebirth). The central storyline centers on the death of Willie, Lincoln's son, & his arrival at the bardo, as well as the grieving Lincoln does over his son (which the story further expands to cover the grief of the loss of life during the Civil War, as well the personal losses that are common to all humanity).

 

Because of the overlapping quote style of writing, it is relatively speedy to read. It alternates between serious, vulgar, funny, sad, touching, sweet, hopeful, depressing, irreverent, & thoughtful.

 

I was pulled in & read it in just two sittings. I normally enjoy off-beat storytelling & would file this book under that category. Since it is getting quite a bit of press coverage & has a decent holds list at the library, I would be curious to hear what others think. I'm wondering if people who enjoy more traditional storytelling would like this one or not; it's hard for me to guess. It's a novel (a first from short-story writer Saunders) that doesn't really feel like a novel.

 

I like the NY Times review of it as I think it does a good job of describing the book.

 

Nice review Stacia! I have this on hold at my library - I think I'm number 56 or something crazy like that. I'm debating just buying it since it sounds like something I'll enjoy. I listened to the sample of it on Audible and liked that very much although several reviewers suggested reading it in print before listening to it as it would be better understood that way because of how it is written.  http://www.audible.c...92920813&sr=1-1


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#157 Stacia

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Posted 22 April 2017 - 11:51 PM

Nice review Stacia! I have this on hold at my library - I think I'm number 56 or something crazy like that. I'm debating just buying it since it sounds like something I'll enjoy. I listened to the sample of it on Audible and liked that very much although several reviewers suggested reading it in print before listening to it as it would be better understood that way because of how it is written.  http://www.audible.c...92920813&sr=1-1

 

It's interesting that you're mentioning the audiobook. My book club is planning to read this later (once there's no longer a waitlist at the library), but one of the gals listens to audiobooks rather than reading the print version. I was talking to her tonight & said I had already read it & wondered how the audiobook would be because of the format. I suggested that she might want to request a written copy alongside the audio version solely because of the format/style.

 

So, then she & I looked it up & it looks like this may be one of the largest (or *the* largest?) audiobook cast ever assembled. And, wow, what a group of voice actors! Many big names. I am not an audiobook person in any way, shape, or form. But looking at the cast list, I think I'm definitely planning on listening to the audio once we get around to it for book club. I saw a few different numbers in various articles, but around 160 seems to be the right number.

 

Time's article about it: Julianne Moore, Ben Stiller and 164 Other People Will Narrate George Saunders’ New Book

 

Looks like Nick Offerman (Parks & Recreation), David Sedaris, & George Saunders himself will be reading the main roles.
 


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#158 Stacia

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Posted 23 April 2017 - 12:05 AM

Congrats on 52, Heather!

 

t9307.gif


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#159 Mothersweets

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Posted 23 April 2017 - 09:33 AM

It's interesting that you're mentioning the audiobook. My book club is planning to read this later (once there's no longer a waitlist at the library), but one of the gals listens to audiobooks rather than reading the print version. I was talking to her tonight & said I had already read it & wondered how the audiobook would be because of the format. I suggested that she might want to request a written copy alongside the audio version solely because of the format/style.

 

So, then she & I looked it up & it looks like this may be one of the largest (or *the* largest?) audiobook cast ever assembled. And, wow, what a group of voice actors! Many big names. I am not an audiobook person in any way, shape, or form. But looking at the cast list, I think I'm definitely planning on listening to the audio once we get around to it for book club. I saw a few different numbers in various articles, but around 160 seems to be the right number.

 

Time's article about it: Julianne Moore, Ben Stiller and 164 Other People Will Narrate George Saunders’ New Book

 

Looks like Nick Offerman (Parks & Recreation), David Sedaris, & George Saunders himself will be reading the main roles.
 

 

Whoa! I didn't realize there were that many people involved! I'm really looking forward to reading and then listening to this one. 


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#160 Violet Crown

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Posted 23 April 2017 - 12:08 PM

Congratulations Heather on 52 books!
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#161 loesje22000

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Posted 23 April 2017 - 12:14 PM

That's 52 books. I can stop reading for the year now. :lol:


I bet you can't! ;)

Congrats!
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#162 Robin M

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Posted 23 April 2017 - 01:02 PM

Link to week 17 - please continue conversation in new thread