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Book a Week 2017 - BW16: Homonym and Synonym


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#51 Matryoshka

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Posted 17 April 2017 - 03:44 PM

I finished up two books that I was already most of the way through and had a bit of a lull mid-week.

 

41. Please Look After Mom (ebook) - bit of an odd book, written in the present tense and mostly in the 2nd person, about an elderly mother who goes missing in the Seoul metro station. Turns out everyone took mom for granted.  3 stars.

 

42. The Ghost Map: The Story of London's Most Terrifying Epidemic - about the 1854 cholera outbreak in London, in which someone finally figured out that cholera was spread by contaminated water and not miasma (stinky air). Interesting and quick read, and I also enjoyed the last couple of chapters where the author mulls on the lessons this episode still has to teach us today, especially about inherent biases and the general failing of the human mind to really process large systemic problems. 4 stars.

 

Stil.... reading...

 

- Beast to Blonde - actually didn't read this at all last week, but I read a chapter and a half this morning .  Which still means I need to read three more chapters this week to catch up.  But I'm finally in section two about the stories, not the storytellers.  Anyone else still slogging through this?  What are your thoughts?  I have to say I really have not enjoyed the last few chapters, and am questioning my commitment.  :glare:

 

- Exiles of Erin - didn't touch this much either, but I've gotten to the third section of the book which promises a different writing style, so hopefully  I can finish it off soon.  Naturalism isn't my favorite literary style, but I think it still may be better than the moralizing treatises on how to be a good Irish-American Catholic that predominated the previous section...  apparently there was more of the pedantic stuff in this period, but the anthologist, in the intro to the third section, quips, "There were quite a number of these writers.  In the interests of space and compassion towards the reader, none of their fiction appears in this anthology."   :lol: Phew.

 

Currently reading

 

- Hillbilly Elegy (ebook)- this came in from Overdrive just as I'd started Truman, so that got put aside.  I'm really liking Hillbilly Elegy so far.

 

- News of the World (audio) - quite enjoying this one, but I don't know that I've got the burning love the way some of you have - I'm wondering if maybe I should have read this one instead?  The narrator is fine, but not awesome.  And his Spanish and German accents leave a lot to be desired, but I'm trying to overlook that ;)

 

- Ensayo sobre la ceguera/Blindness by José Saramago - reading a Spanish translation of the original Portuguese. Somehow in spite of the fact that there are virtually no paragraph breaks or quotation marks, and none of the characters have names, I'm finding it quite readable. :)   A sudden and virulently contagious blindness attacks the populace, and the gov'ts response is to lock them all up (with no assistance whatsoever) in an abandoned insane asylum and shoot them if they try to get out.  It's overfull now; interested to see where he's going with this...

 

I think I'd like to join in on the Maugham read-a-long.  I've read Of Human Bondage, but nothing else by him.

 


Edited by Matryoshka, 17 April 2017 - 03:48 PM.

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#52 Kareni

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Posted 17 April 2017 - 03:48 PM

A couple of bookish pieces ~

 

A thought provoking post:  Why You Should Read Books You Hate by PAMELA PAUL

 

"Here’s a reading challenge: Pick up a book you’re pretty sure you won’t like — the style is wrong, the taste not your own, the author bio unappealing. You might even take it one step further. Pick up a book you think you will hate, of a genre you’ve dismissed since high school, written by an author you’re inclined to avoid. Now read it to the last bitter page.

 

Sound like hell? You’re off to a good start.

 

This is not about reading a book you know is bad, a pleasure in its own right, like an exceptionally dashing villain. It’s about finding a book that affronts you, and staring it down to the last word...."

**

 

A Round-Up of Recent & Upcoming YA Novels in Verse  by Kelly

 

 

Regards,

Kareni


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#53 aggieamy

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Posted 17 April 2017 - 04:52 PM

Happy Easter! What a pleasant few weeks it's been, insulated from the chatter in my head of the Intertubes, and what a wise idea I had in weekly exempting the Book a Week group from my abstention. How good to see our country, long polarized and striving with neighbor against neighbor, locked in entrenched political animosities, brought together as one by the so aptly named United Airlines! I slightly regret that I missed the opportunity to post my own experience of two decades ago, when UA tried to have the entire planeful of passengers (of which dh and I were two) arrested - since when we have avoided their flights, and were entitled to the schadenfreude of seeing them receive their corporate comeuppance.
 

 

LOL. That is a very astute observation of society ... we all agree that United Airlines is basically run with employees trained by Voldemort.

 

I just finished Joe Ide's IQ, which has been billed as a Sherlock for South Central LA. I enjoyed it & that he breaks some of the typical stereotypes with a few of the characters (though plenty of others are stereotypical enough). I think the author's familiarity with the culture shows (he grew up in South Central) & it's not as much of a who-done-it as it is a character study giving us the up-&-coming IQ. If Ide writes more books with IQ as the main character, I'd be curious to read the next one to see where he goes with it.

 

Amy, you asked about it. I'm not sure it's really a book that you'd enjoy, but perhaps one your dh might like to try? Somehow, the rap/drugs/gang/rottweiler culture doesn't quite seem Amy-like, even with the (sort-of) Sherlock connection.

 

Thank you! I do think it is something my DH would like. I will probably skip it and stick to something fluffly and set in England. 

 

I read Dune and Georgette Heyer for Bingo Squares and liked them much better then I thought I would.
 

 

Back that post up just a minute. What Georgette Heyer book did you read?

 

Robin, found an Easter word book. Uncle Fred in the Springtime by P.G. Wodehouse. :hurray:    

 

I just downloaded this to listen to.  How fun!

 

I had a light reading week last week. We spent several days with DH's family as Easter is the big reunion weekend for them. Egg hunts, water balloon fights, hay rides, baseball, and lots of food. A fun time for all. DD2 was playing on the hay bales and I took this photo.

 

attachicon.gifTemp Photo.jpg

 

 

What a cutie!!!


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#54 aggieamy

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Posted 17 April 2017 - 04:59 PM

Lady Florida - Hope surgery goes well for Lord Florida.  Keep us updated!

 

 

Finished:

 

Reset Your Child's Brain: A Four Week Plan to End Metldowns, Raise Grades, and Boost Social Skills by Reversing the Effects of Electronic Screen Time by Victoria Dunckley - This book was only about 350 pages but it felt like it was 9000 pages long. It droned on and on and repeated itself. There was some good information in it but the author comes across a bit .. foil hat wearing. She comes across as believing that ANY screen time is the cause of most childhood problems today from ADHD to social disorders to fits to chicken pox. Maybe not chicken pox but I wouldn't be surprised. Towards the end I did a lot of skimming.


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#55 Happy

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Posted 17 April 2017 - 06:57 PM

The last couple of weeks have been intensely busy in my real estate world. The only real reading I do during those times is favorite re-runs--for the last few weeks that's been Nora Robert's Chesapeake series. Yesterday afternoon I finished Chesapeake Blue.  I loved the first two books, Sea Swept & Rising tides, the most.

 

I read and enjoyed The Language of Flowers by Vanessa Diffenbaugh. It took me a couple of chapters to get the rhythm of the story, but after that it was easy to figure out. Reading it makes me want to learn more about the 'meanings' of flowers--or, maybe better yet, to make up my own. Enjoyable read.

 

I started Founding Gardeners by Andrea Wulf....the writing is very good, the information is wonderful, but it's slow reading for some reason. The type in my paperback is a little too small for comfort (I've never said that before. Sigh) and makes it a little more of a challenge than it needs to be. I'm hoping to pick this up one late afternoon this week and sit in the garden to read it.

 

I also started The Man Who Knew Infinity by Robert Kanigel. I loved the movie of the same name. Lots of detail in the book---I'll eat this one in small bites. Tiny bites.

 

On the business side of my life, I'm reading Andy Andrews new book, The Little Things. It's good--he is a funny guy with a strong message. I'm half way through and enjoying it.


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#56 NoseInABook

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Posted 17 April 2017 - 07:39 PM

I have been stinky at keeping up with these threads lately. My husband brought home Etched In Bone today so I'll be starting that. He was teasing me that he and a coworker judge my books by the cover and try to figure out what they're all about. *snort* They were very disappointed that this one was simple and didn't have enough to go on... but then he apparently found the name Simon Wolfgard and they had a good laugh. ;) I'm glad I can provide them with entertainment. He also has been sucked into a Murakami (IQ84) so you ladies are reaching him too! 


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#57 Butter

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Posted 17 April 2017 - 08:05 PM

We had mandatory quiet time when my son was the same age, back in the day of dial-up.  I usually spent an hour or so reading "news groups"--anyone remember those? It was a form of adult conversation for me around 1995.

 

News groups!  I used to visit those all the time back in the 90s.  Of course I wasn't an adult.  I was 17 in 1995.  My husband, when he was a teen used to dial into bulletin board systems.  His parents ended up getting him his own phone line so he wasn't using theirs all the time.  When we were planning out wedding (we got married in 1998) news groups were fading out and Yahoogroups were getting more popular.  Then there were message boards for pretty much everything and now so many have moved to Facebook groups.  Interesting how things have changed so fast... of course is it so "fast" when we're talking 25+ years...?

 

I finished reading Absolution.  There were several things I totally wasn't expecting.  My husband is listening to it now.  Audible doesn't have the fourth book yet so I may end up reading it to him.  It's a really good series.


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#58 Mom-ninja.

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Posted 17 April 2017 - 08:21 PM

 

Word play is something I enjoy.  Your mention of homonyms and such reminds me of a few books I've enjoyed in the past.  I'll list them here in case others might be interested ~

 

 

I just added all of those to my wish list


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#59 Stacia

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Posted 17 April 2017 - 08:40 PM

Well, I was talking to my sister on the phone earlier & she was telling me an alligator story from today. I told her I needed a link for you gals.

 

Alligator climbs to a second-story Mount Pleasant porch, through a screen door and then refuses to leave

 

(I'm an animal person, so I find it terribly sad that the alligator refused to move, was too big for the space & was eventually euthanized. But, still. I figured you might want to know the story of another friendly southern alligator.)

 

And, in other news, I could use some hugs, good wishes, wonderful vibes, etc... that anyone wants to fling my way. (Or fling a big, big stone my way & put me out of my misery already!) Have had a rough 16 months, am facing a few harrowing weeks at the end of this month/into next month, & I got front-ended (by a giant pickup truck deciding to back-up while in a drive-through line, so he plowed directly into the front of my car) today, leaving me sore & my car needing repairs on top of everything else. My cancer kitty could use any good vibes you want to send him too. :grouphug:  :leaving: 

 

 

 

 


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#60 Jane in NC

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Posted 17 April 2017 - 08:46 PM

I "liked" your post, Stacia, but you know that means I am sending you a hug.

Alligator on the second floor? Now that takes the cake!
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#61 Stacia

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Posted 17 April 2017 - 08:48 PM

Yep, alligator on the second floor. For anyone who has seen those style houses, the second floor landing/porch is usually pretty high/quite a climb.

 

Thanks for the hug.


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#62 Mom-ninja.

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Posted 17 April 2017 - 08:50 PM

As far as reading books you hate, I can make myself do it with classics but almost never with more modern or non-classic books. I pretty much hated Love in the Time of Cholera but I finished it, and I can appreciate the book despite not liking it. On the other hand, I stopped reading The Amethyst Heart because the author was preachy and the writing did not meet the standards of a classic. 


Edited by Mom-ninja., 17 April 2017 - 08:52 PM.

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#63 Stacia

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Posted 17 April 2017 - 08:55 PM

Speaking of reading books you hate....

 

Met a patron at the library today who hates Wuthering Heights as much as I do!

 

Score!

 

:lol:


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#64 mumto2

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Posted 17 April 2017 - 08:57 PM

Stacia, I am liking the alligator part of the post....I can't believe it climbed stairs onto the second floor! Just freaky!

:grouphug: :grouphug: :grouphug: To both you and your kitty. Sending some prayers your way too!
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#65 Butter

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Posted 17 April 2017 - 09:25 PM

I finished reading August Fortress by Andrea Pearson to the boys tonight.  We had two chapters left.  We usually read one a night, but they begged me to finish it and I wasn't going to say no.  It's the third Key of Kilenya book.  The series is aimed at middle grade kids, but I'm finding it to be seriously excellent.  For several nights I've been tempted to read ahead because one chapter just wasn't enough!


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#66 Lady Florida.

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Posted 17 April 2017 - 09:33 PM

Lady Florida - Hope surgery goes well for Lord Florida.  Keep us updated!

 

 

 

 

LOL at Lord Florida. I'll have to tell him. We got home around 7:30 - 12 hours after we left. When he was finally discharged we had been there for 10 hours. He's fine. I have him set up on the couch with everything in reach of his left hand (including both his Kindle and the tv remote :) ). I'm going to bed soon since it's been a long day. I have to get up early and call physical therapy to try and get him in so they can change his dressing. 

 

 

And, in other news, I could use some hugs, good wishes, wonderful vibes, etc... that anyone wants to fling my way. (Or fling a big, big stone my way & put me out of my misery already!) Have had a rough 16 months, am facing a few harrowing weeks at the end of this month/into next month, & I got front-ended (by a giant pickup truck deciding to back-up while in a drive-through line, so he plowed directly into the front of my car) today, leaving me sore & my car needing repairs on top of everything else. My cancer kitty could use any good vibes you want to send him too. :grouphug:  :leaving:

 

That was quite the alligator story. It's too bad they had to euthanize it but they did try. 

 

Sending you good vibes and lots of virtual hugs.  :grouphug:

 

As far as reading books you hate, I can make myself do it with classics but almost never with more modern or non-classic books. I pretty much hated Love in the Time of Cholera but I finished it, and I can appreciate the book despite not liking it. On the other hand, I stopped reading The Amethyst Heart because the author was preachy and the writing did not meet the standards of a classic. 

 

That's pretty much how I handle books I don't like. I'll push through a classic but not a modern book.


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#67 Runningmom80

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Posted 17 April 2017 - 09:39 PM

I'm hanging in there! I have over extended myself yet again so I haven't been posting much. I'm currently reading "A Return to Love" by Marianne Williamson and it's wonderful. :)
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#68 Violet Crown

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Posted 17 April 2017 - 09:58 PM

((((Hugs)))) and prayers, Stacia. Shuddering at the alligator story. Was just at a certain museum today in Heather's neck of the woods, looking at the fossil head of a mega-alligator that used to roam Central Texas, and now wonder how that behemoth would look up on someone's second floor.

While being mostly bored in the Texas history room (though they had J. Frank Dobie's "Triangle Dot" branding iron, so literary connection), I finished August Strindberg's play Easter. It takes place on the three days leading up to Easter Sunday, and presupposes some knowledge of Swedish Easter customs, but is beautifully written and has a scene that reminded me of Carl Dreyer's Danish film Ordet.
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#69 Kareni

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Posted 17 April 2017 - 10:07 PM

 

Yikes!

 

 

...I could use some hugs, good wishes, wonderful vibes, etc...

 

Sending some positive thoughts your way with hopes for happier days to come.

 

 

Sending healing thoughts, too, for Lord Florida.  And for continued healing for you, Nan.  And good wishes for anyone who'd benefit from some.

 

Regards,

Kareni


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#70 JennW in SoCal

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Posted 17 April 2017 - 10:18 PM

Speaking of reading books you hate....

 

Met a patron at the library today who hates Wuthering Heights as much as I do!

 

Score!

 

:lol:

 

Clearly a patron with excellent literary taste! Sending a giant hug your way and the hopes that things start to improve in your corner of the world.   :grouphug: And I can't believe someone backed up at a drive-thru. Perhaps the driver is a relation to the imbecile who started the fire that destroyed the bridge that has sent your metro traffic into the abyss. 

 

I love that the "nuisance removal agent" in the alligator story was from a firm called "Gator Getter Consultants" :smilielol5:

 

 

In book news, I went to the library this morning thinking I'd pick up Razor's Edge but instead came home with 2 mysteries and a quirky little book by Larry McMurtry called Roads: Driving America's Great Highways.  It is a travelogue with related book and movie references along with touches of memoir and and observation of what he sees. I thought I had stumped GoodReads as at first I couldn't find it on there. But it is indeed there, complete with 82 reviews. 


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#71 loesje22000

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Posted 17 April 2017 - 11:46 PM



Back that post up just a minute. What Georgette Heyer book did you read?



In English it is called 'These old shades' but in Dutch it is 'the Virgin of Bassincourt'....
We have 2 Georgette Heyers in the Library, so that limited my choice a bit :)
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#72 Kareni

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Posted 17 April 2017 - 11:52 PM

Some recent reads here ~

 

Eden: A sci-fi Beauty and the Beast by Louise Wise about which I'd heard many good reports.  It was pleasant enough, but I doubt I'll be re-reading it. 

 

"Imprisoned for brutal crimes against his wardens, Fly was taken from his planet Itor and transported to an uninhabited world alongside other criminals. Full of mutiny, anger and a desire for revenge the transportation was never going to be successful and Fly became the only survivor when the craft crashed.

Then the human ship arrived - and Jenny.

With a malfunctioning spacecraft she was in for a fight for her life, but her problems were only just beginning when her crewmates abandon her on Eden.

Jenny's on her own... or so she thinks."

**

 

A re-read of Wrecking Ball (Hard To Love Book 1)  by P. Dangelico which I enjoyed once again.

 

"Cam DeSantis’ life is a hot, steaming pile. How else would you describe losing your husband, your job, and your money all at once? Desperate times call for desperate measures, so when salvation comes in the form of one intolerable a-hole, who just happens to be the starting quarterback for the vaunted NY Titans, she has no choice but to accept his offer as a live-in nanny slash teacher for his eight year old nephew. Now all she has to do is find a safe place in her mind to hide whenever she feels the need to throat punch him into tomorrow…which is often.

Calvin Shaw has zero interest in women. Wait, wait––let me rephrase that. He loves women, he just doesn’t want anything to do with ‘um. Not since his wife, presently ex-wife, got knocked up by the guy she was cheating on him with. Problem is––there’s one living in his house. And he doesn’t know what’s worse, that he promised to be civil, or that he’s attracted to her."

**

 

I re-read Lauren Dane's Tart (A Delicious Novel) which I enjoyed revisiting even though it's not my favorite of her books.  (Copious adult content)

 

Regards,

Kareni


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#73 loesje22000

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Posted 17 April 2017 - 11:52 PM

One :grouphug: for you Stacy, and one :grouphug: for your cat from dd.
(I don't hug our cats, but dd does)
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#74 Nan in Mass

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Posted 18 April 2017 - 05:50 AM

Stacia, sending you hugs hugs and more hugs. And strength, the enduring, stiff upper lip, ability to get on with the tasks at hand sort without thinking too hard about them sort. And gentle pats for Kitty.

Nan
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#75 Onceuponatime

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Posted 18 April 2017 - 06:29 AM

Stacia, sending hugs and good wishes for peace and a speedy/satisfactory resolution of all trials.



I read a big chunk of The Story of Western Science yesterday, then I rummaged through my stacks and found a buried library book that appealed to me: A Blink of the Screen, collected shorter fiction by Terry Pratchett. It's like a historical timeline of Sir Terry's development as writer, starting when he was 13! Light and fun.
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#76 Mothersweets

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Posted 18 April 2017 - 07:44 AM

Stacia,  :grouphug: I hope things start looking up for you. 

 

And that alligator story - eeek!!


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#77 Mothersweets

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Posted 18 April 2017 - 07:52 AM

I finished The Little Book of Hygge! I liked this Benjamin Franklin quote he ended with: "Happiness consists more in small conveniences or pleasures that occur every day, than in great pieces of good fortune that happen but seldom." If anyone would like me to send this book on, let me know!

 

 

This week I'm planning to start Crown Duel by Sherwood Smith. This was recommended to me by a friend from book club. I also need to find our next book club selection The All-Girl Filling Station's Last Reunion by Fannie Flagg. I haven't read any of her books but she has been on my to read list.

 

If no one else has asked, I'd love to read the hygge book! 

 

Also, Sherwood Smith wrote one of my favorite books - Danse de la Folie. https://www.goodread...rom_search=true She's a great writer.


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#78 Penguin

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Posted 18 April 2017 - 08:28 AM

Thanks, Kareni for the Why You Should Read Books You Hate link. I have marked the article for later reading.

 

As an adult, I have read plenty of books that I have hated. I would say that 99.9% of them have been book club books :) For the sake of a cherished book club, I will suffer through books (*). I am still new in my current city, and have joined a nonfiction book club. I have only been once thus far, so I certainly can't call it a cherished book club. But I am interested enough in the book club to read books that I do not want to read. This month, the selection is Arms: The Culture and Credo of the Gun by A.J. Somerset, and there is a reasonable chance that I will hate it. That's because I hate gun culture so much that I do not want to read about it, even from the POV of  "a gun lover who's disgusted with what gun culture has become." I hope I am not straying into the political with that comment. I am just trying to explain my somewhat visceral reaction to reading 300+ pages on this subject, and why I am going to read it anyway.

 

On the other hand...

 

There is certainly an element of gun culture in a book that I just finished and loved so much. The Beautiful Struggle: A Father, Two Sons and an Unlikely Road to Manhood by Ta-Nehisi Coates is easily one of the best books I have read this year. I picked it for my Local Author Bingo Square, and did indeed appreciate the fact that I am familiar with all the Baltimore landmarks. If you followed the first Serial podcast, it took place in some of the same Baltimore-area territory. But it is the way that Ta-Nehisi Coates writes that makes me love this memoir so much. The local connection is the least of the my reasons for singing its praises.

 

Also finished last week:

 

Murder on the Orient Express by Agatha Christie. I love it when I read a new-to-me-classic.

The Gunslinger by Stephen King. I was so confused in the beginning, but was really pulled in by the end. In due time, I will get to Book 2 of The Dark Tower series.

 

*ETA, I do have a couple of triggering topics that I refuse to read. 

 

 


Edited by Penguin, 18 April 2017 - 10:13 AM.

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#79 Lady Florida.

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Posted 18 April 2017 - 08:43 AM

This morning I had a chance to follow the link on reading books you hate - I responded last night without actually knowing what it was about. I agree somewhat with what the author has to say, but (maybe it's because of my "advanced" age) I don't feel like reading books I'll disagree with is the best way to challenge my beliefs. At least not anymore. Maybe if I was younger I'd feel differently. Honestly the older I get the less time I want to spend not liking a book. Also, while my beliefs have changed over time (and quite a few changed before the advent of the internet and social media), few of them were changed because I read a book. The same goes for those beliefs that were strengthened. In fact, I can't think of any that were challenged/changed/strengthened because of a book, especially one I hated. Most involved a number of sources and a lot of contemplation.

 

ETA: Maybe it's about how I process things and has nothing to do with my age. When people ask about a book that "changed your life" I always freeze up because I can't think of a single one.


Edited by Lady Florida., 18 April 2017 - 08:44 AM.

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#80 Ausmumof3

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Posted 18 April 2017 - 08:51 AM

Well, I was talking to my sister on the phone earlier & she was telling me an alligator story from today. I told her I needed a link for you gals.

Alligator climbs to a second-story Mount Pleasant porch, through a screen door and then refuses to leave

(I'm an animal person, so I find it terribly sad that the alligator refused to move, was too big for the space & was eventually euthanized. But, still. I figured you might want to know the story of another friendly southern alligator.)

And, in other news, I could use some hugs, good wishes, wonderful vibes, etc... that anyone wants to fling my way. (Or fling a big, big stone my way & put me out of my misery already!) Have had a rough 16 months, am facing a few harrowing weeks at the end of this month/into next month, & I got front-ended (by a giant pickup truck deciding to back-up while in a drive-through line, so he plowed directly into the front of my car) today, leaving me sore & my car needing repairs on top of everything else. My cancer kitty could use any good vibes you want to send him too. :grouphug: :leaving:


Hugs and well wishes for you and your kitty 😢
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#81 mumto2

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Posted 18 April 2017 - 09:14 AM

I have finished spelling Diamond for April. This one was relatively easy for me because all the books except Mourn Not Your Dead were already sitting in a library stack on April 1. I feel like I cheated almost......

D.......Die Trying by Lee Child
I.......Irresistible by Mary Balogh
A.......Twelve Angry Librarians by Miranda James
M.......Fatal Mistake by Marie Force
O.......Man Overboard by JA Jance
N.......Mourn Not Your Dead by Deborah Crombie
D.......Duck the Halls by Donna Andrews

So far I have managed to read one other book that qualifies for the challenge each month but may not manage it properly this month. Ironically there are lots of books with Diamond in the title but due to huge stacks I really don't feel like reading the fourth in a series that I have never read or worse reading the first three so I can read the fourth (I have a series in order compulsion :) ). Nothing set in South Africa etc in my stack to be moved forward.

I found a book in my physical library catalogue that I thought meant most of my requirements. It was part of a series but it was by an author I have been wanting go try. Wish the catalogue had been a bit more descriptive.....

A historical romance fan that I met at the library sent me home with some of her favourite Stephanie Lauren books last year after telling me order wouldn't matter. I discovered overdrive had them so I put them on the wish list and returned my physical copies which I didn't have time for. I didn't think of Stephanie Lauren again.....so when The Peculiar Case of Lord Finsbury's Diamonds appeared in my search I put a hold on it and when I picked it up was shocked to discover it's thin. It's 155 pages, and the cover classes it as a short story. I started it and like it. Would like to read more in the series which I suspect ties to other series by this author. So for now it's my other Diamond book maybe I will read something else but I can't imagine what. https://www.goodread...bury-s-diamonds

I plan to pick The Shadow Land up from the library today. Totally excited about this one. I love The Historian.....I don't think diamonds are mined in Bulgaria! :lol: https://www.goodread...the-shadow-land
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#82 Narrow Gate Academy

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Posted 18 April 2017 - 09:33 AM

Stil.... reading...
 
- Beast to Blonde - actually didn't read this at all last week, but I read a chapter and a half this morning .  Which still means I need to read three more chapters this week to catch up.  But I'm finally in section two about the stories, not the storytellers.  Anyone else still slogging through this?  What are your thoughts?  I have to say I really have not enjoyed the last few chapters, and am questioning my commitment.  :glare:

I am almost finished slogging through this (only 4 more chapters). In the second half I've enjoyed the section covering various versions of Cinderella and a few discussions about the lives of specific female authors. Otherwise every time she mentions Freud I want to bang my head. I've settled for skimming the parts that have no interest for me which is sadly still a larger part of each chapter.

A couple of bookish pieces ~
 
A thought provoking post:  Why You Should Read Books You Hate by PAMELA PAUL
 
"Here’s a reading challenge: Pick up a book you’re pretty sure you won’t like — the style is wrong, the taste not your own, the author bio unappealing. You might even take it one step further. Pick up a book you think you will hate, of a genre you’ve dismissed since high school, written by an author you’re inclined to avoid. Now read it to the last bitter page.
 
Sound like hell? You’re off to a good start.
 
This is not about reading a book you know is bad, a pleasure in its own right, like an exceptionally dashing villain. It’s about finding a book that affronts you, and staring it down to the last word...."
**

 
An interesting post. I agree with others that I will slog through a classic or a group read, but the wrong tone (preachy, narrowminded, etc.) in a modern book and I don't have the patience to finish.

Well, I was talking to my sister on the phone earlier & she was telling me an alligator story from today. I told her I needed a link for you gals.
 
Alligator climbs to a second-story Mount Pleasant porch, through a screen door and then refuses to leave

And, in other news, I could use some hugs, good wishes, wonderful vibes, etc... that anyone wants to fling my way. (Or fling a big, big stone my way & put me out of my misery already!) Have had a rough 16 months, am facing a few harrowing weeks at the end of this month/into next month, & I got front-ended (by a giant pickup truck deciding to back-up while in a drive-through line, so he plowed directly into the front of my car) today, leaving me sore & my car needing repairs on top of everything else. My cancer kitty could use any good vibes you want to send him too. :grouphug:  :leaving:

I never considered an alligator capable of climbing stairs before. Interesting article.

:grouphug: for you and your kitty
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#83 mumto2

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Posted 18 April 2017 - 09:34 AM

This morning I had a chance to follow the link on reading books you hate - I responded last night without actually knowing what it was about. I agree somewhat with what the author has to say, but (maybe it's because of my "advanced" age) I don't feel like reading books I'll disagree with is the best way to challenge my beliefs. At least not anymore. Maybe if I was younger I'd feel differently. Honestly the older I get the less time I want to spend not liking a book. Also, while my beliefs have changed over time (and quite a few changed before the advent of the internet and social media), few of them were changed because I read a book. The same goes for those beliefs that were strengthened. In fact, I can't think of any that were challenged/changed/strengthened because of a book, especially one I hated. Most involved a number of sources and a lot of contemplation.

ETA: Maybe it's about how I process things and has nothing to do with my age. When people ask about a book that "changed your life" I always freeze up because I can't think of a single one.

In general I totally agree. I tried really hard to think of a time I changed my belief system because of a book alone and can't.

I do have to say that back when the first edition of the WTM was published it probably did change my life. Sort of appropriate to say that here. ;) I had decided I thought I would homeschool but was feeling really anxious about it. Dh saw himself as support but more my choice. I suspect since I had a top rated elementary two blocks away I would have enrolled my dc's when it came down to it, my neighbourhood home ed buddy did a week before first grade started for our oldest. The WTM was a choice in a book club dh belonged to and he bought a copy and gave it to me. That book has reassured me every since. When in doubt I pull it out........

As far as wanting to read books I don't like at this stage in my life, no thank you. Maybe if I needed to for a compelling reason such as related to an illness etc but otherwise no.

Eta....Kathy, how is your dh doing today?

Edited by mumto2, 18 April 2017 - 09:35 AM.

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#84 Lady Florida.

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Posted 18 April 2017 - 10:00 AM

Eta....Kathy, how is your dh doing today?

 

He's doing well though in pain. Thanks for asking. I have to take him to physical therapy in about an hour. They're supposed to change his dressing to a waterproof one and show him how to wash himself. They might start him on a few exercises with the squeeze ball the doctor sent him home with. 

 

For my part there's going to be a lot of waiting as I drive him to PT and follow-up appointments. I'm thankful for my Kindle that's loaded with books. At least I won't get bored waiting or be at the mercy of waiting rooms with old magazines, most of which cover topics I'm not interested in. :)


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#85 Kareni

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Posted 18 April 2017 - 10:22 AM

Thanks, Kareni for the Why You Should Read Books You Hate link.

 

...gun culture ....


*ETA, I do have a couple of triggering topics that I refuse to read. 

 

I've enjoyed reading the various responses to the linked article. 

 

Your use of the word triggering on the heels of the gun reference seemed particularly apropos!

 

 

ETA: Maybe it's about how I process things and has nothing to do with my age. When people ask about a book that "changed your life" I always freeze up because I can't think of a single one.

 

I was about to say the same thing; however,

 

 

I do have to say that back when the first edition of the WTM was published it probably did change my life. Sort of appropriate to say that here. ;) I had decided I thought I would homeschool but was feeling really anxious about it. ...

 

it's probably fair to say that the WTM seriously impacted my life when I decided to homeschool my daughter.  I say WTM and mean the book but also the boards which have been a large part of my life over the past almost twenty years.

 

Regards,

Kareni


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#86 Kareni

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Posted 18 April 2017 - 10:25 AM

A one day only currently free classic for Kindle readers ~

 

 

Silas Marner by George Eliot

 

"A man becomes a recluse when he’s accused of a crime he did not commit

Silas Marner is a skilled weaver working long hours in London for a Calvinist sect that does not appreciate him. When the congregation’s funds are stolen, Silas is framed for the theft and excommunicated. Presumed guilty, abandoned by the love of his life, evicted from his modest home, and humiliated by the men he called his brothers, Silas wanders north to a small village in England’s bucolic countryside. Forsaking contact with humanity, he throws himself into his work, caring for little other than the constant movement of his hands and the stack of money he is slowly amassing. But fate sees it fit that Silas should lose his newfound wealth and gain the companionship of a young orphan, an experience that proves more valuable than any currency."

 

Regards,

Kareni


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#87 Jane in NC

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Posted 18 April 2017 - 10:49 AM

My comment on reading books one "hates"...

 

I would say that it is a good thing to read a book that challenges us.  But hate?  That word is troublesome to me.

 

As others have noted, it is often worthwhile to slog through a classic or a book that is part of the cultural conversation.  But I for one cannot read horror.  Do I hate it?  Not really, I just recognize my own weaknesses and desire to sleep at night. 

 

Like others, I despise the poorly written or poorly edited.  There is no point in reading these books unless I want to raise my level of grumpiness.

 

Sending good wishes to Lord Florida and Stacia.

 

Speaking of animals in odd places...My neighbors have a deck that seems to attract them.  No alligators (yet) but we have seen deer on their deck (which means they climbed four steps or jumped the distance), mating foxes and a Sharp-shinned hawk plucking the feathers off of a mockingbird.  There was also a bobcat in their yard one day.  I often feel that I live in a zoo.


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#88 aggieamy

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Posted 18 April 2017 - 10:54 AM

Thanks, Kareni for the Why You Should Read Books You Hate link. I have marked the article for later reading.

 

As an adult, I have read plenty of books that I have hated. I would say that 99.9% of them have been book club books 

 

I suspect that might be a universal truth. Some of the worst books I've read have been for books clubs. It does make for lively discussion though. The most boring book club meetings are when everyone loved the book.

 

He's doing well though in pain. Thanks for asking. I have to take him to physical therapy in about an hour. They're supposed to change his dressing to a waterproof one and show him how to wash himself. They might start him on a few exercises with the squeeze ball the doctor sent him home with. 

 

For my part there's going to be a lot of waiting as I drive him to PT and follow-up appointments. I'm thankful for my Kindle that's loaded with books. At least I won't get bored waiting or be at the mercy of waiting rooms with old magazines, most of which cover topics I'm not interested in. :)

 

 

Isn't that the truth! Why do doctors offices have such a pitiful selection of reading material? John was really sick last week so I took him to the doctor. I planned poorly and didn't bring anything for either one of us to do but I figured they'd have books. Their kids selection consisted of one Clifford the Big Red Dog which was actually a book written to go along with the Clifford movie. Awful!


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#89 JennW in SoCal

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Posted 18 April 2017 - 11:35 AM

My comment on reading books one "hates"...

 

I would say that it is a good thing to read a book that challenges us.  But hate?  That word is troublesome to me.

 

As others have noted, it is often worthwhile to slog through a classic or a book that is part of the cultural conversation.  But I for one cannot read horror.  Do I hate it?  Not really, I just recognize my own weaknesses and desire to sleep at night. 

 

Like others, I despise the poorly written or poorly edited.  There is no point in reading these books unless I want to raise my level of grumpiness.

 

Sending good wishes to Lord Florida and Stacia.

 

Speaking of animals in odd places...My neighbors have a deck that seems to attract them.  No alligators (yet) but we have seen deer on their deck (which means they climbed four steps or jumped the distance), mating foxes and a Sharp-shinned hawk plucking the feathers off of a mockingbird.  There was also a bobcat in their yard one day.  I often feel that I live in a zoo.

 

Books you "hate"...

 

Yep. I like to think I read broadly, not necessarily just books but news and opinion pieces. I agree that it is good to be challenged by your reading, but see no need to waste time on something exceptionally irritating (Man Called Ove), even if it is a classic (Wuthering Heights).  No single book has changed my life, though a few resonated with me at different times, and a few were treasured companions. 

 

Animals....

 

Tis the time of year when breeding pairs of mallard ducks are looking for quiet little cement ponds to call their own. It does give my dog a huge thrill to chase them out! Doesn't compare to an alligator on the second floor, but this mountain lion story out of the Bay Area is, I think, more chilling. I've always been in awe of the size of the paws on the stuffed mountain lion on exhibit at our local Natural History museum. On the one hand, how cool that they live around us. On the other hand, holy cr*p -- they live around us!  It is bad enough with coyotes stealing and killing pet dogs...


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#90 melbotoast

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Posted 18 April 2017 - 01:01 PM

If no one else has asked, I'd love to read the hygge book! 

 

Also, Sherwood Smith wrote one of my favorite books - Danse de la Folie. https://www.goodread...rom_search=true She's a great writer.

 

I will send you a PM :)

 

I'm a few chapters in to Crown Duel so not enough for an opinion yet. Danse de la Folie sounds like something I would really like! I'll have to find that one soon. 

 

 

 

Sending good wishes to Stacia & Lord Florida!


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#91 Stacia

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Posted 18 April 2017 - 05:24 PM

Thanks, everyone. :grouphug:

 

I never considered an alligator capable of climbing stairs before. Interesting article.

 

I'm not sure if you've been on BaW during all our (numerous) alligator discussions... but, alligators can climb trees! (If I were an alligator, I would prefer climbing steps to trees, I think. :tongue_smilie: ) Grammar question -- should I have used "was" instead of "were" in that sentence? My brain is fried this afternoon.
 

Nan, hope your shoulder is continuing to recover well.

 

And, Kathy, I hope Lord Florida has a speedy & full recovery from his surgery too.


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#92 Jane in NC

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Posted 18 April 2017 - 05:52 PM

Thanks, everyone. :grouphug:


I'm not sure if you've been on BaW during all our (numerous) alligator discussions... but, alligators can climb trees! (If I were an alligator, I would prefer climbing steps to trees, I think. :tongue_smilie: ) Grammar question -- should I have used "was" instead of "were" in that sentence? My brain is fried this afternoon.

Nan, hope your shoulder is continuing to recover well.

And, Kathy, I hope Lord Florida has a speedy & full recovery from his surgery too.

I would use "If I were...." as it is the subjunctive mood in your sentence.

Psst...my son and his girlfriend (!!!!!) arrive for a visit tomorrow. Guess who is Beside Herself?!
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#93 Rosie_0801

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Posted 18 April 2017 - 05:56 PM

I know many of you don't visit the chat board, so I'm posting this link here hoping you'll nip over and answer the poll.

 

http://forums.welltr...l-illness-poll/



#94 Robin M

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Posted 18 April 2017 - 07:10 PM

Sending good thoughts, vibes, prayers for strength, healing, tenacity and peace to Nan, Lord Florida, Stacia and all in need of a gentle hug.


Taxes are mailed and paid. Yeah! One less stress off our plate. We're still going back and forth with the architect on the new business property. The architect, contractor and electrician all had a meeting of the minds yesterday (hmm? Three guys walk into a bar - :tongue_smilie:) and except for minor changes to our ideal layout plan, are all in accord and we're now getting down to the rest of the details like light fixtures, paint and floor tiles. Due to wonderful California's title 24 building standards, every little thing has to be spelled out to a gnat's arse on the plans in order to get the permits. :svengo: Educational process to say the least.

Meanwhile, I'm almost done with diamond. Just have N left. Think I'll read New Spring by Robert Jordan and save Lord of Chaos.for next month's Emerald read.

Edited by Robin M, 19 April 2017 - 01:54 AM.

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#95 Robin M

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Posted 18 April 2017 - 08:08 PM

A couple of bookish pieces ~

 

A thought provoking post:  Why You Should Read Books You Hate by PAMELA PAUL

 

"Here’s a reading challenge: Pick up a book you’re pretty sure you won’t like — the style is wrong, the taste not your own, the author bio unappealing. You might even take it one step further. Pick up a book you think you will hate, of a genre you’ve dismissed since high school, written by an author you’re inclined to avoid. Now read it to the last bitter page.

 

Sound like hell? You’re off to a good start.

 

This is not about reading a book you know is bad, a pleasure in its own right, like an exceptionally dashing villain. It’s about finding a book that affronts you, and staring it down to the last word...."

**

 

A Round-Up of Recent & Upcoming YA Novels in Verse  by Kelly

 

 

Regards,

Kareni

Great article. Arguing with the author, following rabbit trails, fighting against the book thesis, leading to developing a point of view are all great reasons.  I try to avoid books that I would hate, but neither James or John will let me. :lol:   James curiosity has lead to reading together those I would never have on my own. Plus John loves to read books that he hates the viewpoint which he also shares with me in great detail.  Many have lead to interesting and intriguing discussions in our household.    


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#96 melbotoast

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Posted 18 April 2017 - 08:48 PM

I was thinking when I added The Razor's Edge to my Goodreads account, it looked kind of familiar. And now I know why: I found it on my bookshelf! Apparently my husband has read it, although he says he doesn't remember it. It has highlights and notations throughout so it looks like he enjoyed it. I'm looking forward to the group read in May!
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#97 NoseInABook

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Posted 18 April 2017 - 09:06 PM

Holy Moly alligator! I debated going to visit my father who lives in Florida and we thought the best way to do it would be to bring our pop up camper. Until I read all of the campground websites that say to expect scaly visitors at the campsites. Uh. No. I have 6 little pieces of alligator bait that would be at said campsite... crossing that one off of the list. ;)

 

((((Stacia)))) 


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#98 Stacia

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Posted 18 April 2017 - 10:10 PM

So, in addition to buying my ds the book Born a Crime, I had also got him Furiously Happy by Jenny Lawson. I haven't read that one yet, but did read Jenny Lawson's first book Let's Pretend This Never Happened & loved it. I gave a copy of it to my sister a couple of years ago & she became an instant Jenny Lawson fangirl. So, ds is really enjoying Furiously Happy (he says she is 'very real' & funny) & asked me to order Let's Pretend This Never Happened for him. (He likes having copies of books vs. using the library. :svengo: ) I am so happy to have a kid that shares many of my own reading tastes, though!

 

Since he has some -- but not a ton of -- books in his to-read pile (& I can pull a few more from my own shelves for him, including Jose Eduardo Agualusa's books, as well as Mink River by Brian Doyle), I ended up ordering a few things tonight, the ones for ds being ones I've read & enjoyed & know he will too. I rarely bookshop. Somehow it seems necessary right now.... (I guess when life hands you lemons, get books...?)

 

Let's Pretend This Never Happened by Jenny Lawson (for ds)

A Case of Exploding Mangoes by Mohammed Hanif (for ds)

Packing for Mars by Mary Roach (for ds)

Strange the Dreamer by Laini Taylor (for dd; she is a huge Laini Taylor fan but I don't think she realizes this is out)

The Razor's Edge by W. Somerset Maugham (for myself; yes, I previously read a library copy but I think it's worth purchasing for the group read-along)

 

Re: the upcoming Razor's Edge read-along, I highly recommend some related reading: Nick & Jake: An Epistolary Novel by Jonathan Richards & Tad Richards. (I first heard about it during an interview with the authors on Bob Edwards' radio show.) Of course, reading it requires that, at a minimum, you know Nick Carraway (from The Great Gatsby) and Jake Barnes (from The Sun Also Rises), as well as other various fiction & non-fiction people (including Larry from The Razor's Edge).

 

America in 1953 seems hell-bent on squandering the flood tide of international goodwill earned in WWII. Senator Joe McCarthy is on a red-hunting rampage in Washington, and the fledgling CIA under Allen Dulles is starting to dabble in nation-building.

Into this moment of history wander Nick Carraway and Jake Barnes, refugees from Fitzgerald’s The Great Gatsby and Hemingway’s The Sun Also Rises. They begin a correspondence that leads to a close friendship, and widens to include a bizarre cast of characters. From the classic fiction of the period come Larry Darrell (The Razor's Edge), Alden Pyle (The Quiet American), Lady Brett Ashley and Robert Cohn (The Sun Also Rises), and from real life, Roy Cohn (Robert’s nephew) and his pal Davey Schine, Roy’s boss Joe McCarthy, French intellectuals Sartre and de Beauvoir, Iranian premier Dr. Mohammed Mossadegh, and sex-change pioneer Christine Jorgensen. Jake discovers a CIA plot to cause a coup in France, and Nick and Jake must do their best to save their country from itself while affairs of the heart change both of their lives. Nick & Jake finds the uproarious comic potential in a chilling period of American history that has alarming echoes in our own.

 

 

 


Edited by Stacia, 18 April 2017 - 10:41 PM.

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#99 Kareni

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Posted 18 April 2017 - 11:57 PM

Psst...my son and his girlfriend (!!!!!) arrive for a visit tomorrow. Guess who is Beside Herself?!

 

What fun!  I hope you'll have a great time together.

**

 

From Tor.com ~

 

(Usually I know at least some of the titles mentioned in the Five About columns; this time I knew none.)

 

Five Elegant and Moody Fantasies  by Sofia Samatar

 

"I love books with a strong atmosphere. I’m always looking to be transported: that’s what draws me to fantasy. It’s not descriptions of imaginary places or intricate magic systems that attract me, really; it’s the evocation of a mysterious elsewhere in language as weird and lovely as its subject. Language is the magic system.

 

Here are five intensely strange, beautifully written, and transportive fantasies...."

 

Regards,

Kareni


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#100 Robin M

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    Book nerd and cat wrangler

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Posted 19 April 2017 - 01:58 AM

What fun! I hope you'll have a great time together.
**

From Tor.com ~

(Usually I know at least some of the titles mentioned in the Five About columns; this time I knew none.)
Five Elegant and Moody Fantasies by Sofia Samatar

"I love books with a strong atmosphere. I’m always looking to be transported: that’s what draws me to fantasy. It’s not descriptions of imaginary places or intricate magic systems that attract me, really; it’s the evocation of a mysterious elsewhere in language as weird and lovely as its subject. Language is the magic system.

Here are five intensely strange, beautifully written, and transportive fantasies...."

Regards,
Kareni


I don't recognize any of them either. All sound intriguing!
  • Jane in NC, Narrow Gate Academy, Kareni and 7 others like this