Jump to content


What's with the ads?

Photo

When is it time to try Barton?


58 replies to this topic

What's with the ads?

#51 Canadian Mom of 2

Canadian Mom of 2

    Apprentice Bee Keeper

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 5357 posts

Posted 14 April 2017 - 01:38 PM

WoolC, Dancing Bears uses synthetic phonics. I have Jolly Phonics (also a synthetic phonics program), which I use as review of the phonograms (he likes it better than any other program we own) and for handwriting. You could look at it as a supplement, should you need it. It comes in manuscript and what they call precursive (this is the one we have).
http://secure.aidcvt...sp?catid=JLL.PH

If you click on the book covers it will take you to the pages with samples. The TM is all you need. You can find the materials in the book as reproducibles. We are using their grammar also.

Anyway, thought I would mention it.

Edited by Canadian Mom of 2, 14 April 2017 - 08:37 PM.


#52 Canadian Mom of 2

Canadian Mom of 2

    Apprentice Bee Keeper

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 5357 posts

Posted 14 April 2017 - 01:43 PM

Forgot to add, Amazon carries them.

#53 Canadian Mom of 2

Canadian Mom of 2

    Apprentice Bee Keeper

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 5357 posts

Posted 15 April 2017 - 09:45 AM

I had promised I would be back to share when I was further along in Baker's book (Overcoming Anxiety in Children and Teens), so here it goes. It gives general guidelines on the process but also focuses on how to motivate the child to want to participate (I found this part really useful). I already knew the process but it gave me better direction on how to formulate a plan and be more intentional. I had several "aha" moments while reading it. I learned about secondary fears, how to create a fear ladder, and the "Think Like a Scientist" strategy. I feel I have gotten a lot out of it already!

From chapter 7 on he discusses different cases to show the approach in action, in different scenarios. Chapter 9 is on a little girl with selective mutism. The desensitization process was used but with the strategies in place, she managed to face her fears in a few months.

Anyway, I hope this info is useful in some way. It's the direction I am taking so this book will be extremely useful to me. I should be done reading it later today.

Edited by Canadian Mom of 2, 15 April 2017 - 11:02 AM.

  • OneStepAtATime likes this

#54 Canadian Mom of 2

Canadian Mom of 2

    Apprentice Bee Keeper

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 5357 posts

Posted 15 April 2017 - 10:21 AM

Oh, and it also discusses how to adapt the process to use with kids on the spectrum, in cases where it needs to be adapted that is. Chapter 5 discusses lower functioning kids with lower language comprehension.
  • OneStepAtATime likes this

#55 Canadian Mom of 2

Canadian Mom of 2

    Apprentice Bee Keeper

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 5357 posts

Posted 15 April 2017 - 11:32 AM

About the sensory enrichment plan, I think it would be wise for anyone interested to just come up with their own plan based on their child's needs. While I wouldn't have a problem sharing my work in any other situation, in this case it involves a therapy, and I am not a licensed professional. However, I have shared the PDF which lists the materials used and gives a general idea of the process followed. It should not be too difficult to come up with a plan and fine tune it along the way!

All the best,

Marie

Edited by Canadian Mom of 2, 15 April 2017 - 01:19 PM.

  • OneStepAtATime likes this

#56 Canadian Mom of 2

Canadian Mom of 2

    Apprentice Bee Keeper

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 5357 posts

Posted 13 May 2017 - 06:03 PM

Gosh, it felt like it was longer than a month since I looked into the sensory enrichment plan! It had been on my mind but I hadn't quite decided yet how I was going to go about it. One thing I always do is take the theory behind something and come up with my own approach to fit my kids. So, for the past month, I have been pondering over how I was going to go about it and formulating a plan. Yesterday, things just fell into place!  

 

My 8 yr old has been researching habitats the past few days. He has been taking down any books and resources we own and reading, reflecting, talking to me and asking questions... Then yesterday, he announced he wanted to make a habitat project. When we buy things and I see the box is sturdy, I save them in our storage room for projects. So, I pulled one out and suggested we make a diorama. We started yesterday, coating the inside and outside of the box using this process.

 

 

I warned him that it was going to be a project that we were going to be working on for many days, so we can do a good job and make it look as realistic as possible. We were sitting at a table next to an open window and we could hear the rain and wind outside. We could also hear our wind-chime outside and feel the light breeze on our face. We were talking the whole time and he even asked that we sing. I had to remind him a few times to keep his hands moving but overall he was really excited about the project. 

 

When I noticed all the sensory stimulation around us... (note: he just came and asked when we will be working on his habitat today :)  ) I realized, this is how I want to approach this. I took some art courses through an academy of design some in university. I also have several years of music theory and took three years of classical guitar. I will be incorporating all this into projects. I have bought many resources involving art (including how to teach art to people/ kids on the spectrum), music, sensory integration... We have many small musical instruments, a classical guitar, a ukulele and I want to buy him a Djembe drum with instructions on how to play it. I am also looking at some music therapy resources. I will be combining all this into projects, instead of tasks. I will use scented candles burning around us for scents. I will use face and body painting, with different tools, like combs and brushes to spread it on the skin. I will use classical music in the background, etc.

 

As I suspected, after we were done at 30 minutes he was overstimulated. For him, this comes out with hyperactivity these days. I used CBT and mindfulness strategies to help him find a calmer state. Ours strategies so far have taken him from being angry when he is frustrated, to crying. This is the perfect reaction! I remember Temple Grandin sharing in her books that when she was young and kids teased her in school, she would get angry and get into fights. She even got kicked out of one school for throwing a book at a girls head (if I remember correctly), for teasing her. He mom and teacher had an arrangement where, if she did something bad in school (of this sort), the teacher would notify her mother and she would lose TV access for one night. One day it clicked for her that if she cries to get out the frustration instead of getting angry, she did not get into trouble. Aggression has not been an issue with my son, except for some scratching, so again, I consider the crying progress. He cries like any child would cry, not a tantrum or meltdown. Anyway, we then use our CBT and mindfulness and help get him through that as well.

 

I wanted to share this in case it inspires you in some way :)

 

Hope you are doing well,

 

Marie  


  • OneStepAtATime likes this

#57 OneStepAtATime

OneStepAtATime

    Beekeeping Professor

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 31491 posts

Posted 13 May 2017 - 06:16 PM

Thanks so much.
  • Canadian Mom of 2 likes this

#58 ElizabethB

ElizabethB

    Apprentice Bee Keeper

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 9877 posts

Posted 19 May 2017 - 02:55 PM

It could be a phonological awareness problem. Here is a free screening test:

http://www.spelfabet...awareness-test/

My blending page and the sound pictures of sounds vs. syllables on my dyslexia page explain how and why phonological awareness interacts with words and how the letter sounds change when put together.

http://www.thephonic...ndingwords.html

http://www.thephonic...g/dyslexia.html

Many boys need a lot more time to learn the sounds and achieve fluent blending and reading, I have found that it goes faster if you let them use the one page chart on my blending page above to look them up themselves while reading. I also find nonsense words and word lists speed the process, you can do them in fun ways--my phonics concentration game, put the words on cards and run back and forth to get them, make the words yourself from the sound cards, etc.

Edited by ElizabethB, 19 May 2017 - 03:15 PM.


#59 ElizabethB

ElizabethB

    Apprentice Bee Keeper

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 9877 posts

Posted 20 May 2017 - 01:31 PM

If you want to try some OG techniques for cheap as a trial, you can use the OG manual "Recipe for Reading" and add in some nonsense words.  The manual is less than $20, you can use it from a white board and have a complete basic OG program for simple words, workbooks not necessary.  

 

https://www.amazon.c...ipe for reading

 

Nonsense words, free to print with my game:

 

http://www.thephonic...trationgam.html

 

and more in links 2, 4 of student folder and 6 of teacher folder:

 

http://www.thephonic...lesspellsu.html

 

 


Edited by ElizabethB, 20 May 2017 - 01:32 PM.