Jump to content


What's with the ads?

Photo

Dh Taking Over Teaching History


19 replies to this topic

What's with the ads?

#1 myblessings4

myblessings4

    Hive Mind Queen Bee

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 5206 posts

Posted 20 March 2017 - 10:31 PM

Just wanting some ideas!! If your dh taught PS ap world history and ap euro and has promised to take over teaching your hs 9th grader, which curriculum would you choose?

Thanks!

#2 regentrude

regentrude

    Qualified Bee Keeper

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 23606 posts

Posted 21 March 2017 - 06:47 AM

If my DH were an experienced history teacher, I would let him choose the curriculum. He must be familiar with history materials and able to discern which ones might work for his own kid, or adapt anything so it does. Doesn't he have shelves full of stuff?


Edited by regentrude, 21 March 2017 - 06:48 AM.

  • EKS, Lori D., Liza Q and 3 others like this

#3 Liza Q

Liza Q

    Hive Mind Queen Bee

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 1597 posts

Posted 21 March 2017 - 08:04 AM

Are you concerned that he would have too high a standard, as he is accustomed to teaching AP classes? Or are you looking for distinctly Christian (or designed-for-homeschoolers-by-homeschoolers or something) texts that he would not be familiar with?

 

Otherwise, I think he would know best!



#4 myblessings4

myblessings4

    Hive Mind Queen Bee

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 5206 posts

Posted 21 March 2017 - 08:21 AM

He does have shelves full of atuff!

I am worried he will set the standard too high for HER--her issues, her personality, etc.

And I would love a Christian perspective and possibly published for homeschoolers, but neither of those is imperative.

#5 regentrude

regentrude

    Qualified Bee Keeper

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 23606 posts

Posted 21 March 2017 - 09:59 AM

He does have shelves full of atuff!

I am worried he will set the standard too high for HER--her issues, her personality, etc.

And I would love a Christian perspective and possibly published for homeschoolers, but neither of those is imperative.

 

Wouldn't he realize that? He is her parent, too.

 

I don't see any benefit in curriculum specifically designed for homeschoolers if you  have a teacher with subject expertise. Often, the hs curriculum is designed so it can be implemented by a parent without subject knowledge - that is not an issue here.

 

And if Christian viewpoints are important, your DH can include that without specifically selecting "curriculum".

 

If he teaches, he should select material.


  • EKS, Lori D., 2_girls_mommy and 3 others like this

#6 JoJosMom

JoJosMom

    Apprentice Bee Keeper

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 6332 posts

Posted 21 March 2017 - 10:18 AM

Angi, what does your 4-year history plan look like?  Are you going to do chronological history ala WTM, or will you be doing something different.  I know that your DH teaches AP classes, but is that something you want re-created at home?


  • Lori D. likes this

#7 myblessings4

myblessings4

    Hive Mind Queen Bee

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 5206 posts

Posted 21 March 2017 - 10:44 AM

JJM, I hadn't made final plans yet. It was either going to be WTM 4 year cycle style, or world geography for 9th then a 3 year cycle. I didn't think she would be up for ap. Dh thinks he could get her there. And I'm not ao sure I want ps curriculum used with her

I'm really just looking for ideas. Even if dh chooses, it might not be what he already has, so I would like ideas eithwr way.

Be back later.

Edited by myblessings4, 21 March 2017 - 10:47 AM.

  • JoJosMom likes this

#8 tcb

tcb

    Hive Mind Level 6 Worker: Scout Bee

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 1048 posts

Posted 21 March 2017 - 01:35 PM

He does have shelves full of atuff!

I am worried he will set the standard too high for HER--her issues, her personality, etc.

And I would love a Christian perspective and possibly published for homeschoolers, but neither of those is imperative.

 

I get this about the too high standards. My husband is extremely smart, teaches at a university, and is very good at math etc. However, he is not so good at explaining things to our daughters sometimes. I, on the other hand, am not very good at math at all, but am good at explaining in a way they can understand. My dds are very quick on the uptake, much smarter than me, but, in my opinion, sometimes an expert in the subject isn't the best at teaching the lower levels of that subject.


  • Lori D. likes this

#9 J-rap

J-rap

    Hive Mind Queen Bee

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 10320 posts

Posted 21 March 2017 - 01:46 PM

My dh taught AP World History to two of our kids in high school.  He didn't purchase a curriculum.  He was able to get a copy of an AP World History syllabus to determine what all needed to be included, and designed his own curriculum/projects.  He did get a a few new books to supplement that he thought would be a nice addition -- not textbooks.  I'm out of town for a couple weeks so can't tell you what they are, but if it's helpful, I can tell you when I return home.

 

ETA:  Oops, sorry.  I re-read your question, and realize I misunderstood it.  I see that you're dh is not going to actually teach AP World History to your 9th grader, but that he teaches it at a school!


Edited by J-rap, 21 March 2017 - 01:50 PM.

  • Lori D. likes this

#10 myblessings4

myblessings4

    Hive Mind Queen Bee

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 5206 posts

Posted 21 March 2017 - 02:50 PM

My dh taught AP World History to two of our kids in high school. He didn't purchase a curriculum. He was able to get a copy of an AP World History syllabus to determine what all needed to be included, and designed his own curriculum/projects. He did get a a few new books to supplement that he thought would be a nice addition -- not textbooks. I'm out of town for a couple weeks so can't tell you what they are, but if it's helpful, I can tell you when I return home.

ETA: Oops, sorry. I re-read your question, and realize I misunderstood it. I see that you're dh is not going to actually teach AP World History to your 9th grader, but that he teaches it at a school!


I think he WANTS to teach ap to her. I'm just not sure SHE can handle it.
  • Lori D. likes this

#11 Liza Q

Liza Q

    Hive Mind Queen Bee

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 1597 posts

Posted 21 March 2017 - 03:05 PM

I think he WANTS to teach ap to her. I'm just not sure SHE can handle it.

 

Have you discussed this with him? You say you think that is what he wants...

If you are concerned about his standard being too high, ask him!! Would he have a 9th grader in his AP classes at school? Surely, as a teacher, he can determine what is reasonable for her age and abilities. I expect that the school has standards/criteria for students who take AP classes and don't just put every child into those classes. And if he knows what she is capable of and thinks she is up to the challenge, why not trust him?


  • Lori D. and Alessandra like this

#12 Another Lynn

Another Lynn

    Got Coffee?

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 8540 posts

Posted 21 March 2017 - 07:47 PM

I'm speaking out of ignorance here, but if I were in your shoes I would be weighing whether I wanted an AP type class vs. a different kind of deep and meaningful study vs. a get 'it done study.  Undoubtedly your dh has the expertise to teach history any number of ways.  But I personally think AP is not the only way to do a subject well.    


  • Lori D., myblessings4, JoJosMom and 1 other like this

#13 jdahlquist

jdahlquist

    Hive Mind Level 4 Worker: Builder Bee

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 1329 posts

Posted 21 March 2017 - 07:48 PM

I think he WANTS to teach ap to her. I'm just not sure SHE can handle it.

I think that one of the biggest benefits of having an additional or outside teacher for my kids has been gaining another perspective on what my kids' strengths and weaknesses are and what they are capable of.  There is also a big difference in what an ending 8th grader can do and what they will be able to handle by the time they are in 11th or 12th grade (if AP exam prep will only occur in those two years.)  I would suggest before you focus on a particular history curriculum, you discuss what the goals are.  Does your husband want to have her take AP exams?  As a history teacher does he have certain "must cover" content?  Does he have a desire to share a love of history with her?  Is he more focused on covering content or specific skills building?  How will history fit into the rest of high school plans (especially in regards to writing)?   DH and I have shared homeschooling responsibilities, and we have found that understanding these issues like these has been much more important than picking a particular book for a particular subject.


  • Lori D., Another Lynn, Liza Q and 2 others like this

#14 Lori D.

Lori D.

    Amateur Bee Keeper

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 10900 posts

Posted 21 March 2017 - 10:59 PM

And just to add a last few questions to jdahlquist's great list of questions to think through:

 

- What are your DD's INTERESTS?

Does she have a high interest in History and would enjoy a rigorous class in History? Or is it just a "get 'er done" subject for DD, and her passions and interests lie elsewhere? This could flop big-time if DD isn't that "into" History -- and not only grade/credit-wise, but it could strain the relationship with dad, if he thinks she should do more, and she's not interested.  :eek:

 

- What does your DD think of being taught by dad? Esp. if it means going to a class?

Ug -- that could be SO uncomfortable being "teacher's daughter" in a high school class, esp. if it's her first outsourced class! Does she *want* to go to a class outside the home, or would she resent it or hate it?

 

- Can DH adapt well to teach at home?

Or, if I'm  misunderstanding and DH would teach her at home -- esp., how is their dynamic when he has taught her something before? Do they click well? Does she accept instruction from him well? Does he understand her well and know how to mentor/teach her at home rather than public school classroom teach her at home?

 

- As far as what curriculum... Why not use this opportunity for DH and DD to forge something together? Let them look through options and pick something they would like to do and both learn alongside each other. Just to keep things in balance so DH doesn't push too hard -- a typical high school credit of History is about 5 hours of work a week. So that gives DH a guideline for keeping things "reined in" and not assigning too much reading or writing. ;)

 

Together, you can all check out the table of contents for a few programs to get a feel for volume of work (and to see if you'd like to use that program). A few Christian programs:

- Notgrass (World History; American History; Government & Economics -- text + primary source documents + weekly worldview lesson)

- My Father's World -- uses Notgrass and adds to it; integrates History and Lit

- Roman Roads (integrated Humanities: History AND Lit, plus some Philosophy, Geography & Art)

- Veritas Omnibus (integrated History, Lit., and Theology)

- BiblioPlan, Truth Quest, Trisms (History & Lit -- living books approach)

 

 

Other things to look at -- resources for a DIY course:

- Teaching Company Great Courses -- several Ancient History ones are highly rated on this board

- Susan Wise Bauer's History of the Ancient World, and History of the Medieval World

- textbooks (Abeka and Bob Jones are Christian)

- living books

- documentaries

- local History recreation groups, museum field trips, activities, etc.

 

 

Kudos to your DH for wanting to be a part of his child's educational journey! :) As you discuss this possibility, be sure to include DD in those conversations. First, *she* is the one who has to do the work of the classes. And second, at the high school level, it is SUPER important to discuss with your student and give them input about not only what courses to include, but *how* to accomplish those courses. High school is when you begin to hand off the baton a bit at a time and let the student start taking ownership over their education, and helping the student see what is needed to reach the future goals the student has. :)

 

Good luck! Warmest regards, Lori D.


Edited by Lori D., 21 March 2017 - 11:23 PM.

  • Liza Q, myblessings4, JoJosMom and 1 other like this

#15 myblessings4

myblessings4

    Hive Mind Queen Bee

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 5206 posts

Posted 22 March 2017 - 09:10 AM

Dd will not be going into dh class. He will work with her on weekends and evenings and give her the week's assignments all at once.
We're leaning toward using SWB History of the Ancient World, adding in readers and some literature, and dh will add his supplements from school, for geography, writing, activities, a little textbook reading, etc.

#16 myblessings4

myblessings4

    Hive Mind Queen Bee

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 5206 posts

Posted 22 March 2017 - 09:12 AM

Lori, that's a good reminder about the time she should spend. I wouldn't have kept that in mind.

#17 myblessings4

myblessings4

    Hive Mind Queen Bee

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 5206 posts

Posted 22 March 2017 - 09:12 AM

And, yes, we're all deciding together.

#18 myblessings4

myblessings4

    Hive Mind Queen Bee

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 5206 posts

Posted 22 March 2017 - 09:13 AM

I wanted to use Notgrass, if I were traching her. But I don't want him to have to use a whole separate textbook/plan.

#19 JoJosMom

JoJosMom

    Apprentice Bee Keeper

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 6332 posts

Posted 22 March 2017 - 09:33 AM


- As far as what curriculum... Why not use this opportunity for DH and DD to forge something together? Let them look through options and pick something they would like to do and both learn alongside each other. Just to keep things in balance so DH doesn't push too hard -- a typical high school credit of History is about 5 hours of work a week. So that gives DH a guideline for keeping things "reined in" and not assigning too much reading or writing. ;)

 

Together, you can all check out the table of contents for a few programs to get a feel for volume of work (and to see if you'd like to use that program). A few Christian programs:

- Notgrass (World History; American History; Government & Economics -- text + primary source documents + weekly worldview lesson)

- My Father's World -- uses Notgrass and adds to it; integrates History and Lit

- Roman Roads (integrated Humanities: History AND Lit, plus some Philosophy, Geography & Art)

- Veritas Omnibus (integrated History, Lit., and Theology)

- BiblioPlan, Truth Quest, Trisms (History & Lit -- living books approach)

 

 

Other things to look at -- resources for a DIY course:

- Teaching Company Great Courses -- several Ancient History ones are highly rated on this board

- Susan Wise Bauer's History of the Ancient World, and History of the Medieval World

- textbooks (Abeka and Bob Jones are Christian)

- living books

- documentaries

- local History recreation groups, museum field trips, activities, etc.

 

 

Kudos to your DH for wanting to be a part of his child's educational journey! :) As you discuss this possibility, be sure to include DD in those conversations. First, *she* is the one who has to do the work of the classes. And second, at the high school level, it is SUPER important to discuss with your student and give them input about not only what courses to include, but *how* to accomplish those courses. High school is when you begin to hand off the baton a bit at a time and let the student start taking ownership over their education, and helping the student see what is needed to reach the future goals the student has. :)

 

Good luck! Warmest regards, Lori D.

 

As always, excellent advice from Lori D.  So, when is that book coming out?  ;)

 

Angi, truly, I think Lori's advice is spot-on; I bolded the parts I like best.  As for her suggestions, I absolutely puffy heart love Roman Roads' Great Books material.  Love, LOVE, LOVE.  As for History of the Ancient World, hmm...We're using it to supplement RR The Greeks this year (reading/discussing only) and I'm just sort of ...meh.  The activity book is, IMO, waaay too focused on minutiae, so we just use it basically as a guide to discussion, and only parts of it for that.  I think Spielvogel would be a better choice.   (On the other hand, we have both and DD picked HoAW because, for her, it's a better read.)

 

I hope they have fun together.  It sounds like a great opportunity!


  • Lori D., Another Lynn and myblessings4 like this

#20 Lori D.

Lori D.

    Amateur Bee Keeper

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 10900 posts

Posted 22 March 2017 - 11:01 AM

Lori, that's a good reminder about the time she should spend. I wouldn't have kept that in mind.

 

When you design your own course it is SO easy to overstuff it, so tracking hours is helpful for keeping a course within bounds. Sure, some weeks will go a bit over that 5 hours. And some should go a bit under to make up for that. That helps you decide when to drop the odd assignment or reading here and there.

 

Also keep in mind that some of the writing -- like research papers -- done for the History can double-dip with the Writing portion of the English credit. That helps keep both the History and English credits in check, as those credits tend to be among the most time consuming due to the heavy amount of reading and writing involved. (Science also can be time consuming due to the labs -- although, because the type of writing is so different, I would not double-dip that with the English credit.)

 

Enjoy! Hope that will be super fun, having all the family involved. DH did the Logic credit for DSs in high school, and they all loved it. :) Warmest regards, Lori D.


Edited by Lori D., 22 March 2017 - 11:45 AM.

  • JoJosMom likes this