Jump to content


What's with the ads?

Photo
* * * * * 1 votes

Book a Week 2017 - BW12: March Equinox

baw book a week books

241 replies to this topic

What's with the ads?

#51 Kareni

Kareni

    BEEn here awhile

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 15565 posts

Posted 20 March 2017 - 12:28 PM

I stayed up way too late last night (hmm, it might be more accurate to say way too early this morning) reading Desperately Seeking Epic by BN Toler.  This book had me crying.  Trigger alert for child with cancer.  It's currently on sale for 99 cents. This is a book I'll likely re-read.

 

 

"Paul James loved Clara Bateman.
Hating her would have been easier.
She was the past, and he was hell-bent on keeping her there.
Or so he thought...

Craigslist Ad: DESPERATELY SEEKING EPIC

You’re my father.
I don’t know much about you. I know your name is Paul James, you’re a thrill seeker, and once upon a time you did stunts and people called you ‘Epic.’
I’ve been told you don’t know about me. That it’s complicated.
But for me it’s simple.
Here’s the thing: I’m twelve years old…and I’m dying.
And as much as this could crush my mother, I have to meet you before I go.
In time, I’m sure she’ll understand. She’s still in love with you.
So, Epic, if you read this, please come back. You don’t have to be my dad. You don’t even have to tell me you love me or you’re sorry. Just come see me.

Patiently waiting, but running out of time,

Neena"

**

 

A one day only currently free mystery for Kindle readers ~

 

The Gold Bag by Carolyn Wells

 

About the Author
Carolyn Wells (1862–1942) was a poet, children’s novelist, and author of mysteries. Born in New Jersey, she became famous for writing humorous nonsense verse, which was collected in The Nonsense Anthology (1902). She wrote more than 170 books, including sixty-one starring the detective Fleming Stone.
 

 

"A detective investigating the murder of a millionaire teams up with master sleuth Fleming Stone in this clever mystery from a pioneer of American crime fiction

Eager to prove himself as talented a crime-solver as his hero, the famous investigator Fleming Stone, young detective Herbert Burroughs takes on a puzzling case: the murder of wealthy businessman Joseph Crawford, who was killed in the study of his New Jersey home. With no shortage of suspects, the primary clue is a woman’s gold bag discovered at the scene of the crime.

Burroughs believes the old man’s lovely niece is innocent, and he’s beginning to fall for her besides. But the young woman has a clear motive: She stands to inherit the bulk of Crawford’s fortune—and she admits to owning a gold purse! Her unscrupulous fiancé might be the real culprit, however, or it could be one of the millionaire victim’s several disloyal servants. No matter how hard he tries, Burroughs cannot make sense of the clues he unearths, and it soon becomes apparent that only a mind as perceptive as Fleming Stone’s can solve this impossible crime. So the student decides to turn to the master—even if it means seeing the object of his heart’s desire proven guilty once and for all."

 

Regards,

Kareni


  • Jane in NC, AllSmiles, Narrow Gate Academy and 9 others like this

#52 Nan in Mass

Nan in Mass

    Apprentice Bee Keeper

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 9692 posts

Posted 20 March 2017 - 02:57 PM

Well, six weeks after surgery I was allowed out of the sling and was super excited but then at pt the physical therapist had a hissy fit over the idea of my trying to play guitar or paint or draw and forbad me to use the arm for anything but feeding or dressing myself for another six weeks.  I am really disappointed.  I can feed myself perfectly well left handed.  I just have to get the toddler chopsticks if we go out to eat any place asian.  And although it isn't his favourite occupation, my husband is doing a fine job of dressing me.  I wish I could spend my right-hand time on painting instead.  Apparently, it is a different sort of motion, though, so back to colouring leftie to stay occupied, I guess.  So... since typing is labourious, I guess I'm not really here for another six weeks.  Sigh.  I haven't driven since Thanksgiving.  This is not good for my mum or my fur family.  I can't believe how supportive and wonderful our kids have been.

 

We are half way through the last Penderwick book, which my husband is reading me to sleep with.  We have loved these.  Very accurate.

 

I've read or listened to a number of things, including Dune (been a long time, forgot how good it is), some Claudia Bishop mysteries, Carry On, Warrior - Thoughts on Life Unarmed (dead on, in my opinion), Creative, Inc. (probably not interesting to most of you but I liked it), and The Martian (a reread, just as good as I remembered).  I'm in the middle of Hornblower and the Atropos and wishing my library had more Hornblower audiobooks.

 

Nan


  • Jane in NC, AllSmiles, Narrow Gate Academy and 13 others like this

#53 Nan in Mass

Nan in Mass

    Apprentice Bee Keeper

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 9692 posts

Posted 20 March 2017 - 03:23 PM

Scanning backwards, it looks like I missed an upset.  I'm not going to go back and figure out what it was, but I want to offer love and hugs to everyone and thank everyone for making a special place for me in the hive even though I'm not homeschooling any more.  Once you have access to a hive mind, it is really hard to give up that support and knowledge base.  I'm probably stuck here til I die and I am totally not unhappy about it.  We've had other stormy patches over the years together and hopefully this storm will pass and time will heal any wounds eventually.  Hugs hugs hugs...

 

Angelaboord - All three of mine were late talkers, late enough that they started developing a sign language.  They understood well and were good at communicating their needs, but they didn't talk.  The oldest didn't say anything, no animal noises, no mama or dada, nothing but practising sounds, until after his second birthday.  People kept telling us stories about my youngest cousin, who had 4 older sisters and didn't really talk at home until he was an adult and our genius (literally) friend who didn't say anything until after he turned three and then spoke in full sentences.  That certainly wasn't how mine started talking.  They went through all the normal talking stages, just really late.  They were late getting their teeth, too, and I always wondered if those two things were connected.  When my youngest sister had a baby and I watched her talking non-stop to her children, I wondered if I just hadn't talked to them enough, but I don't think it was that.  I talked plenty.  I think mine are just late bloomers.  They were/are late in other respects, as well.  And early in other ways.  Once their talking really got going, they astonished everyone with the things they said, but that wasn't until much later than normal kids.  They are all three excellent communicators now.  Really really good. All that is just in case you or a friend are dealing with this and an encouraging story is helpful. : )

 

Matroishka (probably mangled the spelling but going to check isn't easy) - We are mourning Schoenhoff's, too.

 

Nan


  • Jane in NC, AllSmiles, Narrow Gate Academy and 14 others like this

#54 Mom-ninja.

Mom-ninja.

    Apprentice Bee Keeper

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 12920 posts

Posted 20 March 2017 - 04:49 PM

mumto2, I'm so sorry. 


  • Jane in NC, AllSmiles, Narrow Gate Academy and 5 others like this

#55 Mom-ninja.

Mom-ninja.

    Apprentice Bee Keeper

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 12920 posts

Posted 20 March 2017 - 05:05 PM

I finished another excellent yet difficult read, The Sympathizer. I see why it won so many awards, I think it is The Book about the Vietnam war, from the Vietnamese perspective, written by a Vietnamese-American refugee.  It was engaging, clever, well-written, intelligent, and I thoroughly appreciated, even enjoyed it, until the last couple of chapters, which were just harrowing. A very difficult torture scene was described, please do be warned, but despite that I do recommend the book, but only if you can tolerate a description of serious brutality against a woman. It was almost too much for me.

I thought we told you to lay off the serious, difficult books and read light, fluffy, fun books. :toetap05:    

 

. And although it isn't his favourite occupation, my husband is doing a fine job of dressing me.  

 

It's not his favorite because he has to fight a husband's natural inclination which is to undress his wife. ;) 


  • Jane in NC, AllSmiles, Narrow Gate Academy and 8 others like this

#56 Kareni

Kareni

    BEEn here awhile

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 15565 posts

Posted 20 March 2017 - 05:31 PM

I've been reading these two books since my husband and I were found to have elevated blood pressure. I enjoyed them both, and a number of the recipes sound quite enticing.  Both are by Jessica Goldman Foung.

 

Low-So Good: A Guide to Real Food, Big Flavor, and Less Sodium with 70 Amazing Recipes

 

"millions of people live with medical conditions that require they lower their sodium intake—heart disease, hypertension, kidney disease, and diabetes, to name a few—and research shows most of us would be healthier if we consumed less salt. What could be a challenge becomes an opportunity in Low-So Good, a beautifully photographed book about living a rich life with a low-sodium diet. With 70 recipes for much-loved food (including fries, cake, and dips) and chapters filled with information about how to entertain, dine out, travel, and create a supportive community, Low-So Good empowers anyone to become an expert at living well with less salt."

 

and

 

Sodium Girl's Limitless Low-Sodium Cookbook

 

"Millions of people live with hypertension or chronic kidney disease, and for them, eating a diet low in sodium is a vital part of maintaining good health. And, on average, Americans consume more than double the lower recommended daily intake.

 

Unfortunately, there just aren't enough great low-sodium cookbooks that offer the kind of dishes that home cooks want. But not any more! In Sodium Girl's Limitless Low-Sodium Cookbook, Jessica Goldman Foung, the blogger behind SodiumGirl.com, presents an enticing collection of recipes that bring color and excitement to a low-sodium diet. With creative substitutions, Foung shows people how to lose the salt and keep the foods they love. With this vibrant cookbook, eating great and staying healthy are one in the same, proving low-sodium can be a delight and not just a doctor's orders."

 

Regards,

Kareni


  • Jane in NC, AllSmiles, Narrow Gate Academy and 7 others like this

#57 Chrysalis Academy

Chrysalis Academy

    Amateur Bee Keeper

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 9779 posts

Posted 20 March 2017 - 05:38 PM

I thought we told you to lay off the serious, difficult books and read light, fluffy, fun books. :toetap05:    

 

 

 

LOL, I thought I might get in trouble for that . . .   Honestly, I just needed to finish them both so I could move on and stop thinking about them. I'm going to try and pick some lighter reads this week! I'm really enjoying reading about the powerful women of the 16th century, and reading some Shakespeare. I was thinking of pulling a GH Flufferton off the shelf, too.  Hmm, which one? I'm thinking maybe Bath Tangle?


  • Jane in NC, AllSmiles, Narrow Gate Academy and 9 others like this

#58 Ausmumof3

Ausmumof3

    Amateur Bee Keeper

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 4443 posts

Posted 20 March 2017 - 06:28 PM

I know there's at least one other read aloud revival follower here. Anyone doing anything for Drop everything and read day? I thought I might try make something of it for the kids...

Currently slow to get through anything life is a little too busy. We were away on the weekend with family and I didn't get to read at all.
  • Jane in NC, AllSmiles, Narrow Gate Academy and 7 others like this

#59 Nan in Mass

Nan in Mass

    Apprentice Bee Keeper

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 9692 posts

Posted 20 March 2017 - 06:42 PM

... 

 

 

It's not his favorite because he has to fight a husband's natural inclination which is to undress his wife. ;)

 

: )  He keeps saying that we are going in the wrong direction.  : )

Some bits are nice.  I have long hair and he had to learn to brush and braid it.  Now that he's good at it, that has turned out to be a really nice part of our day.  He's less enthusiastic about taking care of my fur babies.  They are pretty matted, now they are shedding.  They are part of why I was so upset about another six weeks of one armedness.

 

Nan


  • Jane in NC, AllSmiles, Narrow Gate Academy and 10 others like this

#60 Nan in Mass

Nan in Mass

    Apprentice Bee Keeper

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 9692 posts

Posted 20 March 2017 - 06:43 PM

Mumto2 - I'm so sorry.  The loss of a friend when you are an expat must be really hard.  Hugs.


  • Jane in NC, AllSmiles, Narrow Gate Academy and 8 others like this

#61 Faithr

Faithr

    Hive Mind Queen Bee

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 3718 posts

Posted 20 March 2017 - 07:12 PM

I just saw the Little Book of Hygge advertised in the Bas Bleu catalogue.  I'd love to know what you think of it.  


  • Jane in NC, AllSmiles, Narrow Gate Academy and 6 others like this

#62 Kareni

Kareni

    BEEn here awhile

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 15565 posts

Posted 20 March 2017 - 07:31 PM

Earlier I finished Laura Florand's A Crown of Bitter Orange (La Vie en Roses Book 3) which I enjoyed.  While it's the third in a series, it could easily be read as a stand alone book.

 

"Childhood friends.
Tristan Rosier might have asked Malorie Monsard to marry him when he was five years old, but things had only gone downhill from there. She’d spent the rest of their lives ignoring him, abandoning him, and destroying his perfumes. Now she was back, to wreak who knew what havoc on his life.

Lifelong enemies.
Tristan might choose to dismiss the generations-long enmity between their two families, but Malorie didn’t have that privilege. Like all the other privileges wealthy, gorgeous Tristan took for granted that she couldn’t. But if she was going to restore her family company to glory, she might just need his help.

Or the perfect match?
They’d known each other all their lives. Could these childhood friends and lifelong enemies ever uncross their stars and find happily ever after?"

**

 

A $1.99 Kindle bargain that might interest some here:

 

 

"Five fantasy novels by the author of the Enchanted Forest Chronicles, set in a world of magic and noble adventure.

                                                                                              
Shadow Magic
 
While Alkyra’s noblemen squabble, an ancient enemy, the Lithmern, raises an army. And as the head of the Noble House of Brenn attempts to organize an alliance, the princess Alethia celebrates her twentieth birthday. She is quick-witted, beautiful, and handy with a throwing knife. But on the next night, she passes through a dark corridor on her way to the banquet hall, and never emerges from the shadows. The Lithmern have kidnapped the princess. To find her way home, Alethia will have to learn to trust in the old tales, whose legends of magic and daring hold the only hope of saving her kingdom.
 
Daughter of Witches
There is no worse time to visit Drinn than during the Midwinter Festival, when the city gates are sealed so that no outsider can witness the temple’s secret rituals. In an inn, where a young woman named Ranira works as an indentured servant for a brutal innkeeper, three guests have overstayed their welcome. Attempting to protect Ranira from her master’s cruelty, the three reveal their magical powers and attract the attention of the temple guards. Now, to save her new friends from certain death, Ranira must unleash the power that cost her parents their lives.
 
The Harp of Imach Thyssel
When Emereck and Flindaran leave a caravan in search of adventure, it isn’t long before they stumble upon great danger. Emereck, a trained minstrel, and Flindaran, a nobleman masquerading as a tramp, have found a long-abandoned castle, and in it, one of Lyra’s most sought-after treasures: the Harp of Imach Thyssel. To keep it from falling into the wrong hands, Emereck will have to learn to harness its strength to create and destroy, with the fate of the kingdom hanging in the balance.
 
Caught in Crystal
For more than a decade, Kayl has run a modest country inn. She opened it with her husband, and they managed it together until a summer illness took him away, leaving her alone with their two children. The three of them get by, living happily together as the years pass, but everything changes the day a sorceress named Corrana asks for a room. Now, to save her family and her world, Kayl will have to unlock a side of herself that she buried long ago.
 
The Raven Ring
When Eleret’s mother is killed, she must travel to reclaim the belongings her mother left behind. The overland journey to the city of Ciaron is treacherous, but Eleret has no fear. She straps a dagger to her leg and sets off to recover one of her mother’s prized possessions: a ring etched with a raven. Eleret doesn’t know what’s special about her mother’s ring, but someone wanted it badly enough to kill for it. And to make it home in one piece, she’ll need to unlock the mysteries of the ring her mother died to protect."
 
Regards,
Kareni

  • Jane in NC, AllSmiles, Narrow Gate Academy and 8 others like this

#63 melbotoast

melbotoast

    ducks in a row

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 1460 posts

Posted 20 March 2017 - 07:54 PM

Hello all,

We went out of town for spring break last week, and I came back to a lovely surprise in my mailbox! Thanks, Amy! I'm excited to read about hygge.

I finished The Serpent King and really liked it. I also finished White Sand by Brandon Sanderson. This had an interesting magic system, but I didn't really care for any of the characters.

Fairy tale lovers may be interested in Beauty and Rose Daughter, two versions of Beauty and the Beast by Robin McKinley; the Kindle versions are currently on sale for .99. (Sorry no links, I'm on my phone) Beauty is one of my absolute favorites. I read it many times as a teenager, so I'm glad to have my own copy now.

I also picked up Indelible at the library today.

Edited by melbotoast, 20 March 2017 - 08:25 PM.

  • Jane in NC, AllSmiles, Narrow Gate Academy and 10 others like this

#64 melbotoast

melbotoast

    ducks in a row

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 1460 posts

Posted 20 March 2017 - 07:55 PM

Mumto2 - :grouphug:
  • Jane in NC, AllSmiles, Narrow Gate Academy and 5 others like this

#65 Ausmumof3

Ausmumof3

    Amateur Bee Keeper

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 4443 posts

Posted 20 March 2017 - 08:18 PM

This was on the penguin Facebook page but I thought it could be fun here.

Grab the book closest to you. Turn to page 109 and type out the second sentence. Then we can all get to gues which book it is?
  • Jane in NC, AllSmiles, Narrow Gate Academy and 10 others like this

#66 Kareni

Kareni

    BEEn here awhile

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 15565 posts

Posted 20 March 2017 - 08:57 PM

This was on the penguin Facebook page but I thought it could be fun here.

Grab the book closest to you. Turn to page 109 and type out the second sentence. Then we can all get to gues which book it is?

 

I've yet to read the book myself, but here's the second complete sentence from page 109.  It's not terribly informative, so good luck!

 

 

"I understand you have only just returned from your own wedding trip."

 

Regards,

Kareni


  • Jane in NC, AllSmiles, Narrow Gate Academy and 6 others like this

#67 melbotoast

melbotoast

    ducks in a row

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 1460 posts

Posted 20 March 2017 - 09:16 PM

This was on the penguin Facebook page but I thought it could be fun here.

Grab the book closest to you. Turn to page 109 and type out the second sentence. Then we can all get to gues which book it is?


Professor Piot made them squeeze in around a little table in the family section and sent someone to the café car for champagne, and pretty soon they knew all about the Chunnel as an illustration of free-market versus socialized political economy.
  • Jane in NC, AllSmiles, Narrow Gate Academy and 7 others like this

#68 mumto2

mumto2

    Hive Mind Empress Bee

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 5866 posts

Posted 20 March 2017 - 09:29 PM

This was on the penguin Facebook page but I thought it could be fun here.
Grab the book closest to you. Turn to page 109 and type out the second sentence. Then we can all get to gues which book it is?


Since the summer of 1991 the place had been rented out to a childless couple, both of whom were teachers.


I do want to thank everyone for the outpouring of sympathy. You guys are wonderful! :) I am very fortunate to have found all of you.

Nan, :grouphug: I know it must be incredibly frustrating not to be able to resume your normal activities when you were anticipating the date! Especially expressing your creativity. I am highly impressed that you can colour with your non dominant hand.
  • Jane in NC, AllSmiles, Narrow Gate Academy and 9 others like this

#69 Matryoshka

Matryoshka

    Apprentice Bee Keeper

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 10718 posts

Posted 20 March 2017 - 10:36 PM

This was on the penguin Facebook page but I thought it could be fun here.

Grab the book closest to you. Turn to page 109 and type out the second sentence. Then we can all get to gues which book it is?

 

Book closest to me:

 

Añádese que algunos ocupantes de la segunda sala, con una falta de honradez más que censurable, quisieron convencer a los otros de que su número era mayor del que realmente era.

 

Okay, and book closest to me in English:

 

So this is where John Snow found himself professionally when cholera arrived at Golden Square: splitting his days between chloroform and shoe leather, leading a double life of celebrated anesthesiologist and South London investigator.


  • Jane in NC, AllSmiles, Narrow Gate Academy and 7 others like this

#70 LaughingCat

LaughingCat

    Chief Cat Herder

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 1348 posts

Posted 20 March 2017 - 11:19 PM

This was on the penguin Facebook page but I thought it could be fun here.

Grab the book closest to you. Turn to page 109 and type out the second sentence. Then we can all get to gues which book it is?

 

"What is it that we find so scary about our kids' emotions?"


  • Jane in NC, AllSmiles, Narrow Gate Academy and 8 others like this

#71 ErinE

ErinE

    Hive Mind Queen Bee

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 4265 posts

Posted 20 March 2017 - 11:26 PM

Sitting in the ER with DD11, hoping she just has a bad bug and not appendicitis. The closest book to me:

"He could make a coin disappear so smoothly that standing only a handspan away, it was impossible to discover how the devil he did it."
  • Jane in NC, AllSmiles, Narrow Gate Academy and 8 others like this

#72 loesje22000

loesje22000

    Empress Bee

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 3452 posts

Posted 21 March 2017 - 01:07 AM

This was on the penguin Facebook page but I thought it could be fun here.

Grab the book closest to you. Turn to page 109 and type out the second sentence. Then we can all get to gues which book it is?

And in our globalised world economy, we have increasingly seen the problems of one economy wether of inflation or underinvestment, exported around the world with clear negative effects.
  • Jane in NC, AllSmiles, Narrow Gate Academy and 7 others like this

#73 Mothersweets

Mothersweets

    Hive Mind Queen Bee

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 3193 posts

Posted 21 March 2017 - 01:12 AM

Book closest to me:

 

Añádese que algunos ocupantes de la segunda sala, con una falta de honradez más que censurable, quisieron convencer a los otros de que su número era mayor del que realmente era.

 

Okay, and book closest to me in English:

 

So this is where John Snow found himself professionally when cholera arrived at Golden Square: splitting his days between chloroform and shoe leather, leading a double life of celebrated anesthesiologist and South London investigator.

 

 

I think I know! Is this from Ghost Map:The Story of London's Most Terrifying Epidemic-and How it Changed Science, Cities, and the Modern World ?  I've wanted to read this for the longest time. 

 

 


Edited by Mothersweets, 21 March 2017 - 01:16 AM.

  • Jane in NC, AllSmiles, Narrow Gate Academy and 8 others like this

#74 Mothersweets

Mothersweets

    Hive Mind Queen Bee

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 3193 posts

Posted 21 March 2017 - 01:15 AM

Ha! I turned right to page 109 - go figure!  

 

   He said 'Did we?' in a noncommittal tone which did much to destroy the good impression Joseph was making. 


  • Jane in NC, AllSmiles, Narrow Gate Academy and 7 others like this

#75 Mothersweets

Mothersweets

    Hive Mind Queen Bee

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 3193 posts

Posted 21 March 2017 - 01:17 AM

Sitting in the ER with DD11, hoping she just has a bad bug and not appendicitis. The closest book to me:

"He could make a coin disappear so smoothly that standing only a handspan away, it was impossible to discover how the devil he did it."

 

 

Erin, hope your daughter is okay  :grouphug:


  • Jane in NC, AllSmiles, Narrow Gate Academy and 6 others like this

#76 Rosie_0801

Rosie_0801

    Beekeeping Professor

  • Moderators
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 28099 posts

Posted 21 March 2017 - 01:18 AM

"By what right," she demanded, in a tone of arrogance and anger, "do your guards seize the person of our high priestess upon the Isle of Sele, within the holy borders of the shrine?"

 

 

Does this sound like a book I found randomly in my mother's garage that none of us had ever seen before?



#77 Ausmumof3

Ausmumof3

    Amateur Bee Keeper

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 4443 posts

Posted 21 March 2017 - 03:55 AM

Book closest to me:

Añádese que algunos ocupantes de la segunda sala, con una falta de honradez más que censurable, quisieron convencer a los otros de que su número era mayor del que realmente era.

Okay, and book closest to me in English:

So this is where John Snow found himself professionally when cholera arrived at Golden Square: splitting his days between chloroform and shoe leather, leading a double life of celebrated anesthesiologist and South London investigator.


Wow I can't guess any of the books but definitely not the first one 😆
  • Jane in NC, AllSmiles, Narrow Gate Academy and 6 others like this

#78 Ausmumof3

Ausmumof3

    Amateur Bee Keeper

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 4443 posts

Posted 21 March 2017 - 03:56 AM

Sitting in the ER with DD11, hoping she just has a bad bug and not appendicitis. The closest book to me:

"He could make a coin disappear so smoothly that standing only a handspan away, it was impossible to discover how the devil he did it."


Hope your dd is ok
  • Jane in NC, AllSmiles, Narrow Gate Academy and 6 others like this

#79 Ausmumof3

Ausmumof3

    Amateur Bee Keeper

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 4443 posts

Posted 21 March 2017 - 03:58 AM

"What is it that we find so scary about our kids' emotions?"


I have no idea what book this is but it sounds a bit like one I may need to read...
  • Jane in NC, AllSmiles, Narrow Gate Academy and 9 others like this

#80 melbotoast

melbotoast

    ducks in a row

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 1460 posts

Posted 21 March 2017 - 07:37 AM

"I understand you have only just returned from your own wedding trip."


This sounds like a Regency romance. It is difficult to guess these based on one sentence!
  • Jane in NC, AllSmiles, Narrow Gate Academy and 8 others like this

#81 ErinE

ErinE

    Hive Mind Queen Bee

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 4265 posts

Posted 21 March 2017 - 08:00 AM

Erin, hope your daughter is okay  :grouphug:

 

 

Hope your dd is ok

 

Thank you for your kind thoughts!

 

We went home early this morning. She's still running a fever and complaining of pain so she's home today. The ER was swift and efficient as we barely had time to sit down before she was being examined and undergoing tests. The doctor suspects two bad infections, but not appendicitis. We won't know for sure until today or tomorrow as all the rapid tests came back negative. 

 

Yesterday afternoon, I was thinking fondly of how all four children were home on a school day even though three weren't feeling well, a first since the older two chose to attend public school. Watch out what you wish for!


Edited by ErinE, 21 March 2017 - 08:00 AM.

  • Jane in NC, AllSmiles, Narrow Gate Academy and 11 others like this

#82 Chrysalis Academy

Chrysalis Academy

    Amateur Bee Keeper

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 9779 posts

Posted 21 March 2017 - 08:03 AM

Hmm, it's hard to pick the book closest too me when I'm in a small room with two walls entirely covered by bookshelves, so I decided to pick the book closest to my favorite chair in the living room:

 

"Ice cream! Ice cream! Ice cream!"   :lol:

 

Calling all Terry Pratchett fans: dd just finished Going Postal, and loved it. She wants to read more Pratchett.  Other than Wee Free Men (which I put on hold for her), any particularly great entry point into Discworld or his novels? Any books I should be concerned about handing over unpreviewed? She's a fairly precocious 14 year old, dark is ok but she dislikes sex scenes (Uprooted was too risque for her) and any kind of sexual violence. I don't think this is something I need to worry about with Pratchett, but just trying to make sure before I turn her loose . . . 

 

 


  • Jane in NC, AllSmiles, Narrow Gate Academy and 10 others like this

#83 Nan in Mass

Nan in Mass

    Apprentice Bee Keeper

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 9692 posts

Posted 21 March 2017 - 08:06 AM

Le niveau serait plus bas que lors de sa derniere visite.
I have inhabited my son's bunk since surgery and my head is against a bookcase of teen books. That one was closest. If you want English - "Er, no, sarge -- captain." Hmmm... I thought from the title that one would be recognizable to some here, but perhaps not...

Nan
  • Jane in NC, AllSmiles, Narrow Gate Academy and 9 others like this

#84 ErinE

ErinE

    Hive Mind Queen Bee

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 4265 posts

Posted 21 March 2017 - 08:18 AM

Hmm, it's hard to pick the book closest too me when I'm in a small room with two walls entirely covered by bookshelves, so I decided to pick the book closest to my favorite chair in the living room:

 

"Ice cream! Ice cream! Ice cream!"   :lol:

 

Calling all Terry Pratchett fans: dd just finished Going Postal, and loved it. She wants to read more Pratchett.  Other than Wee Free Men (which I put on hold for her), any particularly great entry point into Discworld or his novels? Any books I should be concerned about handing over unpreviewed? She's a fairly precocious 14 year old, dark is ok but she dislikes sex scenes (Uprooted was too risque for her) and any kind of sexual violence. I don't think this is something I need to worry about with Pratchett, but just trying to make sure before I turn her loose . . . 

 

As a new Pratchett reader, I'd recommend Mort and Reaper Man. How can a character representing death make me feel so much? The Color of Magic is my least favorite thus far and I'm working through The Light Fantastic, but my goal for this year will be to work through as many of Pratchett's books as possible.

 

ETA: There's a bit of death (obviously) in the two I've recommended, but I don't remember anything gruesome. There's some awkward courting, but no s*x scenes or outright violence. These were quick reads so you might want to read them for yourself before handing them over to your daughter.


Edited by ErinE, 21 March 2017 - 08:31 AM.

  • Jane in NC, AllSmiles, Narrow Gate Academy and 8 others like this

#85 Narrow Gate Academy

Narrow Gate Academy

    Hive Mind Queen Bee

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 1763 posts

Posted 21 March 2017 - 08:34 AM

This was on the penguin Facebook page but I thought it could be fun here.
Grab the book closest to you. Turn to page 109 and type out the second sentence. Then we can all get to gues which book it is?


I can't guess any of the quotes so far. Here's my closest book:

"I can't keep it secret."
  • Jane in NC, AllSmiles, Kareni and 8 others like this

#86 mumto2

mumto2

    Hive Mind Empress Bee

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 5866 posts

Posted 21 March 2017 - 08:39 AM

Erin :grouphug: I hope your dd is OK.
  • Jane in NC, AllSmiles, Narrow Gate Academy and 5 others like this

#87 Matryoshka

Matryoshka

    Apprentice Bee Keeper

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 10718 posts

Posted 21 March 2017 - 08:41 AM

Thank you for your kind thoughts!

 

We went home early this morning. She's still running a fever and complaining of pain so she's home today. The ER was swift and efficient as we barely had time to sit down before she was being examined and undergoing tests. The doctor suspects two bad infections, but not appendicitis. We won't know for sure until today or tomorrow as all the rapid tests came back negative. 

 

Yesterday afternoon, I was thinking fondly of how all four children were home on a school day even though three weren't feeling well, a first since the older two chose to attend public school. Watch out what you wish for!

 

Wow, that's kind of scary.  Hope some conclusive tests come back soon and they can get her on the right kind of antibiotics.


  • Jane in NC, AllSmiles, Narrow Gate Academy and 7 others like this

#88 Matryoshka

Matryoshka

    Apprentice Bee Keeper

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 10718 posts

Posted 21 March 2017 - 08:45 AM

I think I know! Is this from Ghost Map:The Story of London's Most Terrifying Epidemic-and How it Changed Science, Cities, and the Modern World ?  I've wanted to read this for the longest time. 

 

Ding ding!  Kind of funny, that one sentence I think almost sums up the book's plot, gives the main character's full name and the location. :)

 

I'm stumped by everyone else's so far...


  • Jane in NC, AllSmiles, Narrow Gate Academy and 6 others like this

#89 mumto2

mumto2

    Hive Mind Empress Bee

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 5866 posts

Posted 21 March 2017 - 08:55 AM

Rose, This is the chart my dd used to read all the Discworld books. Kim in Appalachia recommended it for her a couple of years ago.

http://www.geeksofdo.../discworld-2-21


Eta. Just asked dd about possible concerns for a 14yo with discworld. The only one she could think of was the Guild of Seamstresses http://www.geeksofdo...discworld-2-21. She says it's done well, your dd eyes shouldn't burn http://www.geeksofdo...discworld-2-21.

Edited by mumto2, 21 March 2017 - 09:03 AM.

  • Jane in NC, Narrow Gate Academy, Kareni and 4 others like this

#90 aggieamy

aggieamy

    My other forum is a book

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 5333 posts

Posted 21 March 2017 - 09:43 AM

 

 

 

It's not his favorite because he has to fight a husband's natural inclination which is to undress his wife. ;)

 

I literally laughed out loud at that!

 

LOL, I thought I might get in trouble for that . . .   Honestly, I just needed to finish them both so I could move on and stop thinking about them. I'm going to try and pick some lighter reads this week! I'm really enjoying reading about the powerful women of the 16th century, and reading some Shakespeare. I was thinking of pulling a GH Flufferton off the shelf, too.  Hmm, which one? I'm thinking maybe Bath Tangle?

 

That's more like it.

 

Bath Tangle > All Quiet on the Western Front

 

... at least right now!

 

This was on the penguin Facebook page but I thought it could be fun here.

Grab the book closest to you. Turn to page 109 and type out the second sentence. Then we can all get to gues which book it is?

 

I'll warn you ... I'm at my desk doing work so ...

 

The alignment is comprised of a variety of elements joined together to create a facility that serves traffic in a safe and efficient manner, consistent with he facility's intended function. 


  • Jane in NC, AllSmiles, Narrow Gate Academy and 7 others like this

#91 Faithr

Faithr

    Hive Mind Queen Bee

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 3718 posts

Posted 21 March 2017 - 09:48 AM

The 2nd sentence in the closest book to me (I was literally resting my elbow on it as I read the post about finding the 2nd sentence!):

 

"We do not seek that which God could have made, but that which he made.  But I ask you:  if God could have made the world infinite or not: if he could and did not, making it finite, as it is de facto, he did not exercise his his power more in making it so, than if he had made it as large as a pea."


  • Jane in NC, AllSmiles, Narrow Gate Academy and 6 others like this

#92 mumto2

mumto2

    Hive Mind Empress Bee

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 5866 posts

Posted 21 March 2017 - 09:57 AM

Ok, Amy wins! No way are we going to guess that one!!!

Clue......Someone here read mine recently.

Rose, Dd walked through again. Her recommendation is Mort. She considers it to be the first really good one. As Erin said it deals with death but good in all other ways.
  • Jane in NC, AllSmiles, Narrow Gate Academy and 5 others like this

#93 Onceuponatime

Onceuponatime

    Amateur Bee Keeper

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 4281 posts

Posted 21 March 2017 - 10:07 AM

I popped in here to gush over The Country of the Pointed Firs. It is a perfectly lovely nostalgic book, probably my favorite read this year, so far. It's another one of those books you take your time reading to savor the atmosphere.


It is the book closest to me right now, so noone will need to guess, but I'll quote the requested line anyway:

"It wasn't all I expected it would be," she said sadly, as many an artist had said before her of his work.


More:

" I must say I like variety myself; some folks washes Monday an' irons Tuesday the whole year round, even if the circus is goin' by!"

"Perhaps now and then a castaway on a lonely desert island dreads the thought of being rescued."
  • Jane in NC, AllSmiles, Narrow Gate Academy and 7 others like this

#94 aggieamy

aggieamy

    My other forum is a book

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 5333 posts

Posted 21 March 2017 - 10:15 AM

Wow. I don't know any of these book quotes.  Are you ladies reading some really obscure stuff or what?!?!

 

This is mine.  It's basically a roadway/traffic design bible.

 

51QqK01aYJL._SX386_BO1,204,203,200_.jpg

 

 


  • Jane in NC, AllSmiles, Narrow Gate Academy and 9 others like this

#95 Ethel Mertz

Ethel Mertz

    Amateur Bee Keeper

  • Moderators
  • PipPipPip
  • 4389 posts

Posted 21 March 2017 - 11:44 AM

Erin - I hope your daughter feels better soon!

 

I finished Anne Enright's The Green Road for St. Patrick's week. It was ... um ... a rather disjointed read with an ending that left me saying, "Huh?"

 

Currently, trying to cope with a huge pile of library books that came in all at once. One shouldn't do online library requests late at night... 

 

 

This was on the penguin Facebook page but I thought it could be fun here.

Grab the book closest to you. Turn to page 109 and type out the second sentence. Then we can all get to gues which book it is?

 

Here's mine: "It was still dark in the room."



#96 loesje22000

loesje22000

    Empress Bee

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 3452 posts

Posted 21 March 2017 - 11:44 AM

Ok, Amy wins! No way are we going to guess that one!!!
Clue......Someone here read mine recently.
.


Is it one of the Konrad Simonsen books?

Mine is detectible through my goodreads currently reading list I suppose...
  • Jane in NC, Kareni, aggieamy and 4 others like this

#97 Kareni

Kareni

    BEEn here awhile

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 15565 posts

Posted 21 March 2017 - 11:45 AM

Sitting in the ER with DD11, hoping she just has a bad bug and not appendicitis.

 

Sending good thoughts to your daughter and to you.

 

This sounds like a Regency romance. It is difficult to guess these based on one sentence!

 

It is a regency mystery with romantic elements.  The quote is from For Deader or Worse (John Pickett Mysteries, #6) by Sheri Cobb South which aggieamy kindly sent my way.

 

Hmm, it's hard to pick the book closest too me when I'm in a small room with two walls entirely covered by bookshelves, so I decided to pick the book closest to my favorite chair in the living room:

 

"Ice cream! Ice cream! Ice cream!"   :lol:

 

I don't know what book this is from, but since it encapsulates my life philosophy, it's clearly a book I need to read.

 

Regards,

Kareni


  • Jane in NC, Narrow Gate Academy, Angel and 9 others like this

#98 Kareni

Kareni

    BEEn here awhile

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 15565 posts

Posted 21 March 2017 - 11:48 AM

A one day only currently free work for Kindle readers ~

 

The Bond by Neith Boyce  

 

About the Author

 

Neith Boyce (1872–1951), a prolific novelist, playwright, and poet, was a leading literary figure of the Progressive Era. She helped Gertrude Stein to publish Three Lives, cofounded the Provincetown Players theater company, and wrote “The Girl Bachelor,” a popular and pioneering column in Vogue about life as a single woman in New York City. Her best-known novel, The Bond (1908), is based on her famously open marriage to the radical journalist Hutchins Hapgood.
 

 

 

"A riveting tale of love, art, sex, jealousy, and compromise based on one of the most famously liberated marriages of the early twentieth century

A leading literary figure of the Progressive Era, Neith Boyce wrote “The Girl Bachelor,” a popular and pioneering column in Vogue about life as a single woman in New York City. When Boyce—whose circle of famous friends included Carl Van Vechten, Eugene O’Neill, Mina Loy, Mable Dodge Luhan, Margaret Sanger, and Djuna Barnes—wed journalist Hutchins Hapgood, they vowed to make their life together a true union of equals: They would respect each other’s autonomy in everything from art to sexual desire, and could take other lovers provided their commitment to the marriage remained steadfast.
 
In The Bond, Boyce employs a thin veneer of fiction to document the ups and downs of such a radically open-minded relationship. Teresa, a sculptress, struggles to balance her artistic pursuits with her duties as a wife and mother, while her husband, Basil, finds his progressive beliefs about monogamy and sex severely tested when his wife becomes attracted to another man. A fascinating tale of one couple’s attempt to rewrite the rules of marriage, made all the more compelling by its basis in fact, The Bond remains as brave and forward-thinking today as when it was first published more than a century ago."

 

Regards,

Kareni


  • Jane in NC, Narrow Gate Academy, aggieamy and 3 others like this

#99 mumto2

mumto2

    Hive Mind Empress Bee

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 5866 posts

Posted 21 March 2017 - 12:05 PM

Is it one of the Konrad Simonsen books?
Mine is detectible through my goodreads currently reading list I suppose...


Yes, it's The Girl in the Ice. I need to finish it but fluffy books seem to have more appeal now.

Also I've been knitting one of Elizabeth Zimmermans baby surprise jackets. I have no idea if I am doing it right. Truly an odd object as you go along. I did one yearz ago. It is a surprise especially to me! Just googled for pictures and found this http://www.knitting-...urprise_jacket/ Now I need to rip some rows out because the advice in the blog actually solved what I had been trying to figure out! :lol:
  • Jane in NC, Narrow Gate Academy, Kareni and 4 others like this

#100 loesje22000

loesje22000

    Empress Bee

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 3452 posts

Posted 21 March 2017 - 12:15 PM

Yes, it's The Girl in the Ice. I need to finish it but fluffy books seem to have more appeal now.

Also I've been knitting one of Elizabeth Zimmermans baby surprise jackets. I have no idea if I am doing it right. Truly an odd object as you go along. I did one yearz ago. It is a surprise especially to me! Just googled for pictures and found this http://www.knitting-...urprise_jacket/ Now I need to rip some rows out because the advice in the blog actually solved what I had been trying to figure out! :lol:


I'm this far with the Hygge cal :)
http://www.ravelry.c...cts/Loesje22000
  • Jane in NC, Narrow Gate Academy, Kareni and 5 others like this



Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: baw, book a week, books