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Shabby Scholé Weekly Soirée ~The Gap Year~ 3/19/17


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#1 texasmom33

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Posted 18 March 2017 - 06:33 PM

 

After being inspired by recent discussions on Charlotte Mason and Scholé, texasmom33 and I have decided to start a weekly thread to discuss the details of actual implementation. So often after one listens to a podcast or reads a book or blog, there is a feeling of blissful inspiration. Inspiration to...do...what? There's the rub. The what.

 

The plan is to start with a new topic at the beginning of the each week in the hopes of coming up with practical actions that can be done that week or at least soon. They may not be earth-shattering or mountain-moving in and of themselves, but they will at least get done. Many little actions can add up to big changes over time.  Rome wasn't built in a day, and it wasn't built on inspiration alone. 

 

- Woodland Mist Academy

 

 

This week, I wanted to see if anyone was up to discussing Gap Years, and how those can come into play encouraging our teens to be contemplative of the choices impacting their newfound adulthood, and hopefully to seek the true, the good, and the beautiful.

 

I've been told by multiple professors, and read much online, that the experience is truly something wonderful for most teens, yet I have not known anyone personally who has allowed, much less encouraged it in their own children. When I think about Scholé however, it seems like a quintessential coming of age experience, to take a year to contemplate one's self before continuing on with whatever he or she chooses to embark upon. So I know the theory, but would like to talk more about the actual implementation and experience for those who have chosen, or are thinking about doing this. 

 

Have you/are you encouraging your children to consider a Gap Year? What do you see as being the biggest advantages? Disadvantages?  How have their peers (and yours) responded if a Gap Year was taken? Did they participate in a program specifically for students taking a gap year, or did they craft their own opportunity? 

 

Any other things related to Gap Years you would like to discuss? 

 

 

 

(Posting early because another virus has invaded our house and I am about to retreat to my bed for a bit. :(


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#2 Woodland Mist Academy

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Posted 18 March 2017 - 07:06 PM

I only have a moment right now, but wanted to say thanks for taking the time to post in the midst of illness. I have mixed feelings about gap years, so I'm looking forward to the thread.

 

Wishing you quiet rest and a quick recovery!  :grouphug:


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#3 Faithr

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Posted 19 March 2017 - 07:00 AM

My oldest son took a gap year and I wish so much that we had done the same with my middle son, who went off to college just because we pushed him in that direction and he did poorly and came home again, defeated.

 

The hardest thing for my oldest son during his gap year is that his closest friends went off to college and started a new life and he was lonely.  He tried very hard to fill up the time and he did a pretty good job, but it was difficult for him.  That said, I think he appreciated college so much more and took it very seriously because of that gap year.  

 

He didn't do any wonderful mission trip or apprenticeship or anything.  He wanted to get into a competitive music school and he wanted another year to prepare for the audition, because he didn't start playing guitar until he was 15 and many of the kids trying to get into the school had been seriously playing since they were little.  He spent much of his time practicing, going to lessons, participating in a rock band (where he didn't like a single person - lol, they were totally not on the same plane).  Once he got in to the school (Christmas Day he was notified) then all the adrenaline push for the audition was gone.  Instead he had the winter, spring and summer to get through before he could go off.  He studied and took clep tests, he tried to get a job but that so depressing b/c no one hired him. It was absurd and humiliating.  He sometimes hung out with younger homeschoolers he was friendly with.  He took classes at the community college but didn't click with any of the kids there in any significant way.  It was really rough.  Once he got to school, he really blossomed.  He did very well academically, he made tons of friends and he's still living up in Boston with those friends, two years after he graduated.  

 

Now my other son that we pushed into college didn't have any motivation and didn't know what he wanted to do with his life at all.  We pushed him because his older sister said that she knew of guys like him at her college and that once he got there he'd change, like they seemed to.  Well, it didn't work out.  I wish that we had sent him away to do some kind of physical, hands on work somewhere.  I think he would have flourished and matured.  

 

My third son is on the spectrum and suffers from anxiety/depression.  He also is going to take a gap year.  He already struggles with friends, so that is hard.  He's gotten seasonal jobs.  He's doing a 5 week music camp this summer.  In the fall I am hoping he gets a job.  At least he's had a seasonal job for the last two years at a nearby park, so he'd at least be able to do that.  He is taking classes at the community college and also studying music.  I hope he gets into the community college jazz band next year.  So I don't know if going to the community college and then going off to a 4 year college (the one the student truly wants to go to) is considered a gap year?  Not in the usual sense, I guess, but we've used it that way.  It does provide another year to prepare for going away and to have a not quite ready to launch student get more time at home to mature.


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#4 lmrich

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Posted 19 March 2017 - 07:20 AM

My son is taking a gap year after his freshmen year. He had suffered from depression and anxiety and just poor choices (skipping meals, poor sleep, etc..)

He is serving at the Colorado YMCA of the Rockies. They have an amazing opportunity for kids. He is part of the Elevate program which has a mission to help kids find their purpose. He is working 40 hours a week in various departments, gets paid and gets room and board as well as exciting programs. Last week he got to dog sledding; he has gotten to go skiing several times. He has learned practical skills like how to replace a floor, how to clean (housekeeping), and other maintance stuff. We are not sure about the 'personal growth' stuff as he does not share that openly with us.

 

Of course, I cannot report on how all this turns out for him as he is in the middle of it.

 

I think for some kids a gap year is a great idea. There are so many programs out there to examine. If we had endless funds...I would want to take a Gap year myself!


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#5 Evanthe

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Posted 19 March 2017 - 08:19 AM

We plan to do a Gap Year.  Mine are interested in doing a mission trip and oldest already does a ton of volunteer work in the field she plans to have a career in, so if nothing else, she would continue that.  I'm not sure where to start looking with the mission trip thing.

 

My son is also looking into getting his EMT during his gap year, but our college website says no one will hire you until you are 21 (because they are uninsurable before that).  Not sure if that's true, but we've been looking into volunteer firefighter programs, etc.

 

So, we don't have solid plans, but we do intend to take a Gap Year (and it will involve some kind of volunteer work).


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#6 texasmom33

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Posted 19 March 2017 - 10:13 AM

 

  So I don't know if going to the community college and then going off to a 4 year college (the one the student truly wants to go to) is considered a gap year?  Not in the usual sense, I guess, but we've used it that way.  It does provide another year to prepare for going away and to have a not quite ready to launch student get more time at home to mature.

 

That's an interesting point. I have never thought of CC as serving that purpose, but I guess it definitely could. I went the CC route, and we're encouraging our dd to go that route as well (be it with or without a gap year). It's only anecdotal, but I've yet to know a single person who went off to a 4 year right away and a) managed to graduate within 4 years, and/or b) did not come home with a massive amount of either student debt or credit card debt. I guess I never thought about it, but CC kept me from ever getting into that position. I transferred my junior year and graduated right on time, top student of my major, and went right on to grad school, so I did very well by the CC route. 

 

I started college at 17, and dd would also be 17 if she started the fall after graduation (we have the same birthday and both started school early :)  ) . But we're totally different on so many things. A gap year would've freaked me out because I was on this imagined schedule in my head. I was VERY driven. I already felt behind the curve knowing I wanted to go to grad school. I didn't want to be "old" starting out....lol. She's no where near the type A control freak I used to be and has no idea what she wants to do, which is probably the way it should be! She has so much she wants to explore and the idea of a gap year is becoming more and more intriguing to all of us.I hate to admit it, but it also might be also because dh and I both find college life to sound more and more unproductive, and at some schools down right counter-productive to producing well adjusted adults. Giving her an extra year doesn't seem the worst idea. 

 

Anyway, I appreciate reading everyone's experiences and input. Thanks for sharing. 


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#7 Woodland Mist Academy

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Posted 19 March 2017 - 11:02 AM

As several posters have mentioned, much depends on the student and the situation.

 

A few situations I can think of right now:

 

Gap year as burnout recovery from high stress high school. The teens are told to just push through and then they can take a gap year to recover. 

Gap year used to do something wonderful to increase the odds of admission to a more elite school 

Gap year to travel before life's responsibilities make it more difficult

Gap year as time to mature

 

I used to be leery of the last one after seeing some students never end their gap year. In all fairness it was more "taking a year off" than a planned productive gap year.  That year turned into three or four before there was gainful employment and direction.

 

I eventually realized if that same type of student goes directly to college, it doesn't mean he will be more driven and stay on course. Sometimes it means he will still flounder for a few years AND have lots of debt owed to the school he flunked out of. 

 

On the other hand, going straight to college is what gives some students the push they need to mature. For a different type of student, time out of school can lead to feelings of lack of direction, wasting time, going off course etc. 

 

Finding the right gap year program or plan for the right kind of student might be life-changing. I'm still not convinced it's the best path for everyone though. As of right now, my teen has no plans for a gap year. 

 

Who knows what I'll think by the end of this thread...I may be shipping her off to a Gap Year on Mars.  ;)

 

 

 

 


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#8 texasmom33

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Posted 19 March 2017 - 12:26 PM

I wish I could give dd a version of  the old Grand Tour type tradition as a Gap Year.......I think that was a beautiful and useful tradition. But unless we start playing the lottery,  she's going to have to settle for the poor girl's version and stay here in the U.S. I think. I'm glad we have time to consider what to do about it though, and one of her teachers has already mentioned having a list of possible opportunities, so I'm curious to find out more of what they are. 


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#9 Woodland Mist Academy

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Posted 19 March 2017 - 12:29 PM

I wish I could give dd a version of  the old Grand Tour type tradition as a Gap Year.......I think that was a beautiful and useful tradition. But unless we start playing the lottery,  she's going to have to settle for the poor girl's version and stay here in the U.S. I think. I'm glad we have time to consider what to do about it though, and one of her teachers has already mentioned having a list of possible opportunities, so I'm curious to find out more of what they are. 

 

I hope you'll share what you find out!


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#10 Rosyl

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Posted 19 March 2017 - 02:52 PM

My sonis doing a gap year.  I am unsure about it.  My fear is that he will lose momentum.  I finally said that I don't care as long as it is productive.  His planning stage is not proving productive.  I think that is because he is still searching for a vision. He seems to realize that a grandiose plan for mission trips and travel aren't going to happen so he is reconciling his reality.  I also think he want his gap year to start Aug/Sep and I think that means it starts in June. :closedeyes: 

 

Soooo, I'm looking forward to everyone's experiences.


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#11 mims

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Posted 19 March 2017 - 03:11 PM

My daughter did a short term mission in 8th grade and loved it.  She asked if she finished all of her school work early if she could live with her aunt who started an orphanage in Africa in what would be her senior year.  We have no extra money so couldn't see how it would work out but she worked ahead every year, ran fund raisers through our church such as a massive garage sale and serving food at different activities, and did all the leg work figuring out what she needed to do (such as shots, passports, etc.)  She spent her senior year in Tanzania helping in the early learning center, sewing uniforms, doing website stuff etc.  Absolutely life changing!  She then went to a year of Bible school and is finishing up her teaching degree now with plans of going oversees.  

Our second just did one year of Bible college and then university.  An excellent year for him to get his legs under him in a fairly safe environment.

Our third doesn't want college but we want a year of Bible college or some sort of gap year to give her also a year to figure out her future.

 

We did not pressure our younger ones to follow the first because it was her vision and desire.  It would not have been near the same experience for them.  We do insist on the year of Bible college because if the difference we have seen.


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#12 Closeacademy

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Posted 19 March 2017 - 04:17 PM

My oldest plans on having a gap year. She's been working and saving her money. Her plans are:

 

1. be an exchange student or if that doesn't work out

2. live with friends abroad and travel in that area or if that doesn't work out

3. travel to some of the places she wants to go.

 

Her main goal is to become fluent in another language by living there. Her dream is Iceland or Latvia.  I think it will be good for her because it will give her some time to be independent but still have a safety net. Have her see some of the rest of the world and appreciate what she has. And it gives her extra time to prepare for college.

 

 


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#13 regentrude

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Posted 19 March 2017 - 08:04 PM

Neither of my kids were interested in a gap year. They were both chomping at the bit to get off to college.

DD is a driven academic overachiever; she craved the intellectual challenge that even extensive DE at the local public university during high school could not provide for her. She went to college early at age 17. She may take a year to ponder what she wants to do after she graduates with her double major.

DS wants to get done quickly with college because he is interested in an active athletic career, which has an expiration date.

 

I can see a gap year as a wonderful option for a student who is not mature enough to attend college, or a student who has a specific plan - work abroad, learn a language, backpack the world.

I can see it as dangerous for a student who does not have a specific plan, who could loose momentum and find that working minimum wage suits him just fine and that furthering his education is too much trouble.


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#14 texasmom33

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Posted 19 March 2017 - 09:16 PM

Neither of my kids were interested in a gap year. They were both chomping at the bit to get off to college.

DD is a driven academic overachiever; she craved the intellectual challenge that even extensive DE at the local public university during high school could not provide for her. She went to college early at age 17. She may take a year to ponder what she wants to do after she graduates with her double major.

DS wants to get done quickly with college because he is interested in an active athletic career, which has an expiration date.

 

I can see a gap year as a wonderful option for a student who is not mature enough to attend college, or a student who has a specific plan - work abroad, learn a language, backpack the world.

I can see it as dangerous for a student who does not have a specific plan, who could loose momentum and find that working minimum wage suits him just fine and that furthering his education is too much trouble.

 

I accidentally did the bolded. I switched graduate schools at the last minute and so I had a semester to hang out before I could start at UT. It actually worked out well because I did some substitute teaching and tutoring during that time so at least I had something on my resume in the meanwhile, but more than that, it also made me even more determined that grad school was where I wanted to be. I wasn't ready to be done with my education at that point- I missed the intellectual challenge as you describe. 


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#15 Evanthe

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Posted 20 March 2017 - 06:57 AM

My kids are involved in a lot of volunteer work, so they're not scrambling to start college right away.  A Gap Year would be fine.  My dd15 has been working with a pit bull rescue for several years.  She was really little when she started working there and we had to practically beg them to let her work.  We contacted a bazillion rescues in the area and they all turned her down (because of her age).  She works at the facility with the dogs, helps them with fundraisers, helps run adoption events, she's helping set up a 5K in a few weeks, she brings home emergency foster dogs...  

 

She also works twice a week at an equestrian physical therapy place - working with the horses and special needs kids/adults.  She was actually on the news last fall (lol).  She's a permanent fixture at these places.  She also has some kind of social media thing set up to rescue dogs who are about to be euthanized.  She's helped a number of dogs in shelters get saved by other rescues.

 

If we gave her a Gap Year, she would come up with some plan to save the world...  :tongue_smilie:


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#16 Bluegoat

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Posted 20 March 2017 - 12:43 PM

I have two friends who did gap years, though they weren't called that at the time. One simply didn't have much momentum after high school - he'd attended a fairly rigorous boarding school since grade 8. His father owned a large home/hardware store, and he worked there for the year. He felt it was a good experience, he saved some money and also did "real" work which wasn't something he had done in that way before. And he was sure afterwards that he didn't want that kind of work, either the floorwork or even the managerial work. So, he was motivated when he came to university, despite being a party-boy. My other friend went did an overseas program through the MCC. She lived with a family in Africa for a year. She did some volunteer work in the village, but mostly the program was intended as a cultural exchange for young people. It was quite eye-opening, even for a girl rained with an outhouse - there were 8 kids in a two room shack. I think she considered this worthwhile, one of the definitive periods in her life really, and when I met her the year she came to university she certainly had a kind of maturity and sense of proportion that was quite unusual in someone of 19. I'd not have a problem with my kids doing a gap year. With a child more up in the air about what direction to go in, I might encourage exploring some possibilities, or getting a shorter term qualification that could be used to generate income. I'm not convinced all my kids will want to go to university, so we'll see, I guess.
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#17 Mom2boys

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Posted 20 March 2017 - 05:16 PM

I in effect took a gap year, though it wasn't called that at the time. I spent my senior year of high school in Brazil as a Rotary exchange student. (I was bored to tears in my small town and my high school had nothing left to offer me.) I had a fabulous experience and would do it again in a heartbeat. My older son went straight to college, but my younger son has expressed interest in a gap year. Since he has a late August birthday, I think it would be a good thing for him on several fronts. Looking forward to reading all of your posts. dashing out the door to a board meeting right now.


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#18 lovelearnandlive

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Posted 20 March 2017 - 06:59 PM

My dd is only 12, but I am thinking ahead about a gap year for her, if she continues to be serious about ballet. If she sticks with it and reaches her potential, I could see her trying a year with a company as a trainee or apprentice and then making a decision about continuing with that path or going to college full-time and pursuing another interest.
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#19 Mom2boys

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Posted 21 March 2017 - 08:05 AM

SWB's oldest son took a gap year. I believe he worked the first part of the year to fund his travels to India and South Africa. She talks about gap years in this video: 

 

And Julie Bogart briefly discusses gap years in this post: http://blog.bravewri...05/12/gap-year/

 

And here is an article with ideas for how to spend your gap year: http://www.collegebo...gap-year/19847/


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#20 Liza Q

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Posted 21 March 2017 - 08:35 AM

We've not had a proper planned Gap Year but so far my children have had similar experiences.

 

My oldest went right to college but took a year after graduation to think about what she wanted to do. She stayed home and worked two part-time jobs. Realizing that her degree in Psychology was just enough to get her retail and receptionist and child-care positions really motivated her to go to grad school. She was able to take her time with the GRE and applications while also deciding what she really wanted to do. She decided to borrow for her Masters and maybe it was a mistake...but it was a considered adult decision and she had time to make it without any pressure. Now she has her Masters, a job in her field that she loves, and is chipping away at the debt.

 

My second had technical difficulties as a homeschooler being accepted to our local CC so she was unable to start there until the January after she graduated from High School. She spent that June-January traveling in Germany, working almost full-time at the job she had part-time in High School, and self-studying German so she wouldn't lose ground before she started college. She was horrified that she was starting "late" and she was miserable the entire time.

 

My third had worse technical difficulties when she graduated last spring. She spent this past fall doing a TASC program and took the test in December. Now...she is sitting on her ass, dragging her feet on applying to college and/or a job. But she has a lot of issues and honestly I think she is not ready for either college or a full time job. She has an October birthday, so my husband and I feel that she is just 18 and we are ok with going slowly. For now. Eventually, issues or not, we hope that she will find something to do!! But I think that she may just need this time to decide what she wants to do. We're giving her till June at which time we'll start her on the "adulting" path we had for her sisters - we had adult child living at home contracts with our older girls and she knows that is coming.

 

IOW. I think Gap Years are ok for a kid with a plan. When it is the path of least resistance...well, what if it goes on forever?

 

 


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#21 wintermom

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Posted 21 March 2017 - 09:04 PM

I took a gap half-year in the middle of my undergrad program. The plan was to travel in Europe and then stay in Norway and work for a few months. It actually worked out well, thanks to my extended family finding me a job and a place to stay (I house sat for them).  It was a pretty stupid plan to try all on my own, but I got really lucky and the help I needed. After the experience, I returned home and finished my undergrad, and then went back to Norway to study and eventually got a full-time teaching position at a Folk High School. 

 

The gap year phenomenon has been very popular in Scandinavia for decades. Very often, students take a year after completing high school and they attend a Folk High School. These schools are very popular in the Nordic countries. The students choose from hundreds of different schools where they can immerse themselves in all kinds of programs. Most Folk High Schools don't offer academic programs, rather they were experiential and hands-on learning. Most students stay in dorms. There are international students who attend these schools.

 

http://www.folkehogs...php?page_id=354


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#22 Rosyl

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Posted 22 March 2017 - 11:35 AM

SWB's oldest son took a gap year. I believe he worked the first part of the year to fund his travels to India and South Africa. She talks about gap years in this video: 

 

And Julie Bogart briefly discusses gap years in this post: http://blog.bravewri...05/12/gap-year/

 

And here is an article with ideas for how to spend your gap year: http://www.collegebo...gap-year/19847/

 

 

 

Thanks for sharing these links.


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#23 Bluegoat

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Posted 22 March 2017 - 02:27 PM

We've not had a proper planned Gap Year but so far my children have had similar experiences.

 

My oldest went right to college but took a year after graduation to think about what she wanted to do. She stayed home and worked two part-time jobs. Realizing that her degree in Psychology was just enough to get her retail and receptionist and child-care positions really motivated her to go to grad school. She was able to take her time with the GRE and applications while also deciding what she really wanted to do. She decided to borrow for her Masters and maybe it was a mistake...but it was a considered adult decision and she had time to make it without any pressure. Now she has her Masters, a job in her field that she loves, and is chipping away at the debt.

 

My second had technical difficulties as a homeschooler being accepted to our local CC so she was unable to start there until the January after she graduated from High School. She spent that June-January traveling in Germany, working almost full-time at the job she had part-time in High School, and self-studying German so she wouldn't lose ground before she started college. She was horrified that she was starting "late" and she was miserable the entire time.

 

My third had worse technical difficulties when she graduated last spring. She spent this past fall doing a TASC program and took the test in December. Now...she is sitting on her ass, dragging her feet on applying to college and/or a job. But she has a lot of issues and honestly I think she is not ready for either college or a full time job. She has an October birthday, so my husband and I feel that she is just 18 and we are ok with going slowly. For now. Eventually, issues or not, we hope that she will find something to do!! But I think that she may just need this time to decide what she wants to do. We're giving her till June at which time we'll start her on the "adulting" path we had for her sisters - we had adult child living at home contracts with our older girls and she knows that is coming.

 

IOW. I think Gap Years are ok for a kid with a plan. When it is the path of least resistance...well, what if it goes on forever?

 

I think the difficulty is for those kids, post-secondary education might be just a gap-filler as well.

 

It seems to me that unless someone else is going to support the person, this is not going to be a possibility for most people to sit around and do nothin for the long term, - they at least will have to support themselves.  It's kids who have no plan that seem to me to need to have that experience the most - maybe they are the sorts that need hands-on work, or a new environment to see what the possibilities are.  Some kids seem to come out of high school and it is as if they have not had enough chance to really be engaged in making their own way. 


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#24 texasmom33

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Posted 22 March 2017 - 02:53 PM

I think the difficulty is for those kids, post-secondary education might be just a gap-filler as well.

 

It seems to me that unless someone else is going to support the person, this is not going to be a possibility for most people to sit around and do nothin for the long term, - they at least will have to support themselves.  It's kids who have no plan that seem to me to need to have that experience the most - maybe they are the sorts that need hands-on work, or a new environment to see what the possibilities are.  Some kids seem to come out of high school and it is as if they have not had enough chance to really be engaged in making their own way. 

 

I had a plan, but had had no chance to be involved in making my own way. I wasn't allowed to work in high school, or initially in college either.  College was an assumption, if not a command.  I solved some of that by getting engaged at newly turned 18! I think that was my solution to making my own way. :) 

 

I wouldn't be upset if my daughter decided to be married young, but I do hope to get her figure out her own way instead of prescribing the "you WILL go to college and blah blah blah," that I grew up with. Not that I resent going to college, or think my parents had anything but the best intentions. I am glad I did and they saw what not going to college meant for careers stagnating, so they meant well. I do think it sheltered me a great deal though. And now I think now, we and our kids have more options, and I want all of my kids to be aware of them and to "be engaged in making their own way."  Anyway, all of that to say I love that phrase Bluegoat. I'm stealing it. :) 


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#25 Evanthe

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Posted 23 March 2017 - 06:00 AM

Because of this thread, dd and I have been talking about what she would want to do if she took a Gap Year.  After some googling, she's really interested in doing AmeriCorps for a year.  Anybody's kid try AmeriCorps after high school?


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#26 Corraleno

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Posted 23 March 2017 - 05:17 PM

DS is taking a gap year next year for a variety of reasons, mostly related to his sport. He started fencing fairly late (14.5, whereas most elite fencers start at 10-11 or even younger), and he felt he would be in a much better recruiting position after an additional year. That turned out to be a smart choice, since he's picked up three more national medals and an international one this season. At the same time, having such an intensive competition and travel schedule (5 Nationals, 3 World Cups, PanAmerican Championships, plus several week-long training intensives and various local and regional competitions) meant it was a struggle just to keep up with his senior year coursework — there's no way he could have added the stress of college recruiting and applications on top of that without his schoolwork suffering.

 

So he will graduate in June and then plans to continue competing as much as possible, while meeting with various coaches to choose a program. He can't sign a letter of intent until November 1st, but he should know before then where he's going. In addition to fencing, he wants to focus on some of the languages he hasn't had enough time for in the past couple of years, like Turkish and Mongolian.


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#27 Corraleno

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Posted 23 March 2017 - 05:19 PM

Because of this thread, dd and I have been talking about what she would want to do if she took a Gap Year.  After some googling, she's really interested in doing AmeriCorps for a year.  Anybody's kid try AmeriCorps after high school?

 

FYI, Americorps is one of many programs that would be eliminated under the current budget proposal, so you might want to have a Plan B in case it gets cut.


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#28 Evanthe

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Posted 24 March 2017 - 09:27 AM

FYI, Americorps is one of many programs that would be eliminated under the current budget proposal, so you might want to have a Plan B in case it gets cut.

 

Oh no!!  We'll definitely look for a Plan B.


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#29 Amateur Actress

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Posted 24 March 2017 - 10:20 PM

We've had several friends' kids do a YWAM Discipleship Training School (DTS) as a gap year...2 were homeschoolers, 1 was a Christian schooler. Our second oldest, a daughter, who graduates this year from PS is accepted into one of the YWAMShips programs. It's a 5-6 month commitment...3 months in training & classes and 2-3 months in a foreign country evangelizing. You can choose by destination or field of interest. This daughter craves adventure...her training will be in Hawaii and then she'll sail on a ship in the South Pacific visiting and helping various places. We are really encouraging all 5 of our kids to do this...though our oldest went right to school because of the nature of her program...a conservatory acting program with audition. The DTS costs a lot, but most kids send out support letters and get the money that way.
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