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Anyone teach a language survey?


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#1 Dust

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Posted 25 December 2016 - 11:52 PM

I want my second grader to become familiar with other languages. So my plan is to hold a weekly language exploration class. I was thinking to go about 12-15 weeks and then start learning a new language (Chinese or Spanish most likely).  

 

I was thinking to present one language per week. The language and the main countries where it is spoken, show examples of the written language, and listen to a song or video or other example of the language. 

 

Has anyone done anything like this? Any pointers? 

 

 


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#2 CadenceSophia

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Posted 26 December 2016 - 04:08 AM

Are you mostly planning to stick to main world languages? 3 months seems like a long time for each language if you don't plan on actually learning it. If I were just doing a survey, I'd think maybe 3 weeks per language? Otherwise what is the point? You would only cover 3 languages in a year out of the hundreds and thousands that exist.

I plan to do something like this when things settle down. We do it a bit but not formally. I'm a bit of a language study geek and I like to talk to my kids about the politics of minority languages, show examples of the different speech sounds used around the world (including clicks which are always awesome), and teach the (debatable) difference between dialect and separate language. I am hoping to include lists of minority languages with our study of geography and cover the politics and writing systems more formally some time..

Thanks to and Wikipedia, you will have tons of resources available.

Edit: Sorry I don't know if I understood your first post, and even after re-reading I am unclear. You want to learn about 12-15 languages and THEN pick one to study for real? That makes more sense than what I was thinking but forgive me if I have it wrong both times.

Edited by CadenceSophia, 26 December 2016 - 04:12 AM.

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#3 Rosie_0801

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Posted 26 December 2016 - 04:15 AM

No, but I occasionally buy dd bilingual language books. She gets all excited about them, and copies words into text messages to her uncle, lol.

 

If you're going to do something like this, I think a small kid would get more out of exploring different alphabets than different languages. 



#4 Mshokie

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Posted 26 December 2016 - 08:38 AM

Our co-op is doing something like that. They are doing one class that does an hour of language a week for 6 weeks. Then, there is another 1-hour class about what it would be like to live in a different country each week. The classes are coordinated so that they cover matching countries and languages in the same week.

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#5 Dust

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Posted 27 December 2016 - 03:35 PM

Are you mostly planning to stick to main world languages? 3 months seems like a long time for each language if you don't plan on actually learning it. If I were just doing a survey, I'd think maybe 3 weeks per language? Otherwise what is the point? You would only cover 3 languages in a year out of the hundreds and thousands that exist.

I plan to do something like this when things settle down. We do it a bit but not formally. I'm a bit of a language study geek and I like to talk to my kids about the politics of minority languages, show examples of the different speech sounds used around the world (including clicks which are always awesome), and teach the (debatable) difference between dialect and separate language. I am hoping to include lists of minority languages with our study of geography and cover the politics and writing systems more formally some time..

Thanks to and Wikipedia, you will have tons of resources available.

Edit: Sorry I don't know if I understood your first post, and even after re-reading I am unclear. You want to learn about 12-15 languages and THEN pick one to study for real? That makes more sense than what I was thinking but forgive me if I have it wrong both times.

Yes to your edit.

 

I'm looking at 1 week per language, and only giving each language one official day each week.



#6 Dust

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Posted 27 December 2016 - 03:44 PM

No, but I occasionally buy dd bilingual language books. She gets all excited about them, and copies words into text messages to her uncle, lol.

 

If you're going to do something like this, I think a small kid would get more out of exploring different alphabets than different languages. 

 

Thanks for the suggestion. My list of languages to cover got way too long, and this suggestion makes it easy to pare down the list. And I keep forgetting that he still has so many years for learning. There's no need to teach everything THIS year! 



#7 CadenceSophia

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Posted 27 December 2016 - 05:19 PM

Since it is only for a second grader, I'd stick to choosing from the list of world and supra-regional languages. That cuts you back to a little over 15. You could cover all the romances languages over a few weeks instead of entirely one at a time (honestly they will sound really similar to an untrained ear getting one class of exposure).
Save one week to talk about how there are many many many minority languages and dialects that need protection all over the world. (We have a Russian dialect dying just two hours down the road from us, Ninilchik Russian and so many of the languages of Native Alaskans and other Native Americans are really struggling).
I think a 7 year old might also find it interesting how some countries have a language of instruction for school that is none of the children's native language.

#8 loesje22000

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Posted 29 December 2016 - 03:07 PM

We just learned some typical children things in several languages:
To count to 20
Colors
Day's of the week
The word for 'hide and seek'
The song 'head, shoulders,....'
'I lost my mom, my name is ....'
The song 'happy birthday' or something similar.