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#1 mom31257

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Posted 14 July 2016 - 09:50 PM

Tell me about homeschooling high school in Ohio. We are praying about moving there near dh's family. We probably wouldn't do this until ds is mid-high school.

What are the legal requirements?

May we issue his diploma?

Is dual-enrollment possible? If it is free, is it funded by lottery money?

What are the high school graduation requirements?

Thank you for any info!!

Edited by mom31257, 14 July 2016 - 09:51 PM.


#2 Erica H

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Posted 15 July 2016 - 07:25 AM

Tell me about homeschooling high school in Ohio. We are praying about moving there near dh's family. We probably wouldn't do this until ds is mid-high school.

What are the legal requirements?

May we issue his diploma?

Is dual-enrollment possible? If it is free, is it funded by lottery money?

What are the high school graduation requirements?

Thank you for any info!!

 

Legal requirements:  Send in notification letter to the superintendent of your district that you are homeschooling along with assurance that you will cover all subjects and a brief outline of what resources you will use.  After the first year, you need to have an assessment done or your child has to take a standardized test and you need to send in the results along with your notification.  

 

You will issue the diploma.

 

Dual enrollment is possible, but not free.  You have to apply early in the year and the state awards a certain number of credits for homeschool students (completely free for public school students).  My daughter is a rising freshman and was awarded 12 credits for the year.  Older students were awarded more - I think I've seen some up to 28 credits.

 

No high school graduation requirements.  You graduate your own student.  If your child is going to college, you would want to follow what the colleges want for incoming students.

 

If you're on facebook, there's a great page - Ohio Homeschooling Parents - for a lot of information, help, and support.  

 

Good luck!  


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#3 kbutton

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Posted 15 July 2016 - 04:22 PM

I am tiptoeing up to high school, but I've been collecting information.

 

The previous poster is correct, but I have a couple of things to add. The assessment that you submit after your first year of homeschooling (if you are not doing standardized testing) is a portfolio sort of thing (though it can be super informal). You need a teacher who has a license in the state of Ohio to submit a statement saying that your child has made "adequate yearly progress." Easy peasy. For graduation, it's STRONGLY recommended (but I think not required) for you to keep the excusal letter (excused from compulsory attendance) for the child's senior year. I keep ALL of my kids' letters. When you submit your intent to homeschool, you have certain things you want to say (or not say in your letter), such as that you're going to provide 800 hours of instruction. You do NOT need to log that time. No one does, and it's not checked. You also submit a list of intended curriculum that shows you are covering the required subjects (listed in the legislation)--the list is for informational purposes only.

 

You do decide requirements for your child to graduate, but I think the state does have minimums for public schooled kids. The workshops I've attended have tiered recommendations for the level of college you think your child will attend (select, Ivy, state school, etc.), though you definitely want to look at specifics for schools your child is looking at.

 

The dual enrollment option is called College Credit Plus. It's been revamped in the last couple of years, and they are still tweaking here and there. There are fees homeschoolers have to pick up that public school students do not. There are grass roots efforts (writing to the state, etc.) to get that changed. In fact, if you join the Facebook group Ohio Secular Homeschoolers, you might find out about some of that stuff (you might mention that you are not in OH yet in case that's a requirement to join). You can post any homeschooling in OH question there. The group is not restricted to secular homeschoolers, but the page is for posting information that is secular. They are a great group for information. If you land in the Cincinnati area, there is also a Facebook page for Cincinnati Secular Homeschoolers.

 

The process for utilizing CCP has firm deadlines, and many things you want or need to do can be done concurrently, some after the deadline. I think most of those things are SPRING dates. Some of the hoops read like a process, but it's more like a checklist. If you do it like a process, you might find that you are up against date conflicts between colleges and the process, though I think colleges are trying to make it as easy as possible--many hold information meetings for interested parents. I do think some of the things you need to do are contingent upon one another, but not all of them.


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#4 Erica H

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Posted 15 July 2016 - 04:47 PM

Thank you kbutton for adding all of that important info.  I did not know about that particular Facebook page.  I am going to check it out now.  

 

 


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#5 mom31257

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Posted 29 January 2017 - 10:28 AM

I wanted to come back and ask something else. We have now decided to wait a few years and possibly move the summer before ds' senior year. His homeschool friends here are 1-2 years older. We want him to do dual enrollment his senior year, so we figure his life will be changing during that time anyway. A move in the midst of those other changes seems easier than a move now.

 

If we don't move there until the summer, does that mean he wouldn't be accepted for dual enrollment in the fall? Is there a limit on spaces or just who gets the money? If we were willing to pay, would that mean he could still attend classes?

 

 



#6 cintinative

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Posted 30 January 2017 - 11:38 AM

bump for you

 

Mine are not this age yet so I am not sure.



#7 Erica H

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Posted 30 January 2017 - 11:47 AM

I wanted to come back and ask something else. We have now decided to wait a few years and possibly move the summer before ds' senior year. His homeschool friends here are 1-2 years older. We want him to do dual enrollment his senior year, so we figure his life will be changing during that time anyway. A move in the midst of those other changes seems easier than a move now.

 

If we don't move there until the summer, does that mean he wouldn't be accepted for dual enrollment in the fall? Is there a limit on spaces or just who gets the money? If we were willing to pay, would that mean he could still attend classes?

 

I am wondering this, too, since we are considering moving before fall.  I would contact the college where you'll be moving and ask there.  They can tell you about admissions and possibly handle the dual enrollment questions as well (the college we use now has an excellent DE person, but I doubt that's the case everywhere).  Otherwise, I would contact the ODE about moving and dual enrollment.  

 

I think if you're willing to pay, there should be no problem with admissions in time for fall classes, but I don't know how the CCP money would work.