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Independent History besides History Odyssey for 8th grader


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#1 kand

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Posted 22 April 2016 - 11:07 PM

My 2nd dd will be in 8th grade next year, and has been very clear she prefers subjects she can do independently whenever possible. She used Notgrass America the Beautiful, and that worked well, but their World History won't work for us. (In general, I tend to find much of the Christian curriculum out there doesn't suit us (though ATB was fine), so I'm likely not looking for something specifically-Christian.)

We looked at History Odyssey together, and she liked the look of it and chose the Middle Ages. After reading reviews and parts of Van Loon's Story of Mankind though, I don't think HO looks like the best choice for us. It seems so many people find it to make history a terrible drudgery, and I don't want that. She doesn't love history as it is, so the perceived busy work might make it intolerable. If we did use it, I would want to replace Van Loon. I really disliked some of his phrasing in talking about people, and if my dd is working independently, I won't be able to discuss that as we go.

Is there another independent history program anyone would recommend? I'm happy to hear more feedback on HO as well.

#2 SilverMoon

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Posted 23 April 2016 - 08:57 AM

I ordered Build Your Library's grade 8 schedule for my rising 8th grader and from what I've read of it so far, I'll just be handing it over for him to run primarily independently. It's a literature based history of science course. Secular.


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#3 fairy4tmama

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Posted 23 April 2016 - 10:19 AM

Yep, seconding Build Your Library. I recently switched my oldest to BYL because he wanted to work independently and it's been fantastic! I really enjoy that there is a literature selection as well as a reader so that I am still doing a read aloud with him but even that he do on his own.

 

FYI They will be coming out with 9 th grade over the summer with the rest high school to follow.


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#4 Apple Bean Tripod School

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Posted 23 April 2016 - 11:36 AM

We tried HO for a bit at the beginning of this year and although I don't think it's bad, it just wasn't for us at all.  It felt so disjointed.  Like studying a progression of people and not the story of the Middle Ages.  And DD was seriously not a fan of all the summaries and narrations.  I think if the goal is to memorize important events and people, it would do the job.  I love history, so my goal is different.  We started BYL 7th after ditching HO, and it has been great, although the 7th grade curriculum is not world history.  We are planning on using BYL 8th next year and are really looking forward to it.  The book selections are so very interesting and DD loves them.


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#5 Ms Brooks

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Posted 23 April 2016 - 01:05 PM

The Human Odyssey (K12) is a good choice when paired with reading, outlining, and map work. I also add DBQ's document based questions to this mix. Build Your Library looks really good!


Edited by Ms Brooks, 23 April 2016 - 01:09 PM.

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#6 kand

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Posted 23 April 2016 - 02:03 PM

Build Your Library looks like a popular choice :). I've looked at it before, and looking at the 8th grade year now, I like a lot of what I see, but I also see some books (notably the Dawkins book) that have a pretty heavy anti-Christian bias, and that won't work for us. As I said, we don't use much Christian curriculum, but we are Christian, so whatever we use has to at least be respectful of that. Old Earth, evolution, hard science, all of that is good, but books that insult or patronize people of faith are not. I might need to start another thread asking for feedback specifically on that with regards to BYL, as I'm still considering it.

 

Human Odyssey could work. I actually have the first two volumes of the text, and I have the accompanying workbooks for the second volume, but my oldest dd found the workbooks to be boring busywork, so I'm concerned this dd will as well. I will have her take a look, though.



#7 fairy4tmama

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Posted 23 April 2016 - 02:49 PM

Kand you could also go with level 6 or seven as well...I am doing level 6 with my 7th grader because that's where we were in history and it's been fine...I haven't felt the need to beef it up or anything. I haven't found anything that would be anti-Christian in level 6 in fact thus far we have encountered a number of Christian characters in the literature and readers.



#8 SilverMoon

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Posted 23 April 2016 - 03:11 PM

FWIW, I'm not a Dawkins fan either, and my dislike has nothing to do with religion. I bought the scheduled Dawkins book from a used bookstore and read it myself a couple months ago. I decided to go ahead with it, but we'll start with why I don't like Dawkins, read the book aloud together, and use it for discussion fodder.

 

Alternatively you could very easily just skip the book entirely, or replace it with one of your own choosing that could be read in the same time frame.


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#9 kand

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Posted 23 April 2016 - 03:47 PM

FWIW, I'm not a Dawkins fan either, and my dislike has nothing to do with religion. I bought the scheduled Dawkins book from a used bookstore and read it myself a couple months ago. I decided to go ahead with it, but we'll start with why I don't like Dawkins, read the book aloud together, and use it for discussion fodder.

Alternatively you could very easily just skip the book entirely, or replace it with one of your own choosing that could be read in the same time frame.


This might work, if it turns out the Dawkins book is the only issue. I saw someone recommended one of Richard Feynman's book as an alternate, and I already have one of his on hold at the library for my 10th grader, so I'll see if his style is accessible to my middle schooler.

#10 Mrs Twain

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Posted 24 April 2016 - 08:26 AM

Not a curriculum, but this is what I am planning for my 8th grader next year to focus on American history:

 

--Read A Patriot's History of the United States (Schweikart)

--Critical Thinking Co.'s U.S. History Detective, workbooks 1&2

--History documentaries/videos (+/-)

 

I have not done this before, so I don't know how it will go.  Ideally I will try to match up the history detective workbook lessons with Schweikart's book.  I would also like to try to work some documentaries/videos into the program, or maybe alternate documentaries with the workbooks so the year will not be monotonous.

 

My dh read the Schweikart book this year and plans to discuss it with my son as the year goes along.



#11 Kareni

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Posted 26 April 2016 - 06:24 PM

Is there another independent history program anyone would recommend?

 

We did not use a history curriculum per se.

 

My daughter started homeschooling in 7th grade. She covered pre-history to 500AD in seventh, 500AD to 1700AD in eighth, and 1700AD to 2000AD in ninth grade.

 

Here is what I handed to my daughter in 7th grade.  I will list the resources we used in the next post. 

 

 

"History and Reading

 

The plan:

 

To study history chronologically from prehistory to about AD500.

 

The means:

 

We’ll use Hillyer and Huey’s two books Young People’s Story of the Ancient World as well as numerous other books and resources.

 

Typically each week there will be a list of required reading.  There will generally be a novel to be read pertaining to the time period.  There may also be some myths and legends to be read.  There will also be non-fiction books or selections to be read and perhaps a website to visit or a video to view.

 

You will need to locate any places mentioned on the map, in a historical atlas and on the globe (if we obtain one).  Each week you will make two pages for your Book of the Centuries.  These pages should be work you can be proud of!  They should be well planned, edited and neat.  They can be in your best cursive or done on the computer.  All art work should be done with care.  The pages should pertain to the time period being studied.  Each page should be titled.  Pages might cover such topics as:

 

A people

A great man or woman (a ruler, artist, explorer, scientist)

An artifact (tools, buildings, type of writing)

A religion

An event

A discovery or invention

A war or battle

The daily life of a people

A map (route of an explorer, location of a people) 

An imaginary encounter between two historical personae

???

 

You might find information on these topics at home or you may need to do additional research at the library or online. 

 

Maps should include a legend (which may be printed) in addition to the title.

 

In addition to your two pages, you should also note five to ten important dates in your Book of the Centuries."

 

Regards,

Kareni


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#12 Kareni

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Posted 26 April 2016 - 06:24 PM

To continue from the previous post:

 

First a general note about my list, we're quite liberal so some of the videos on the list as well as a few books (i.e., Gonick's the Cartoon History ...) might not suit all families.   I enlisted my husband to watch all of the videos with my daughter.  It gave them something to enjoy together and also involved my husband in homeschooling.

 

Bear in mind that my daughter was a voracious reader; I suspect that one might happily use far fewer books.  We also were homeschooling on a serious budget our first few years of homeschooling, and so I basically used what I could locate at the library and thrift stores.

 

Recall that this list covers the time period from prehistory to 500AD.  

 

My daughter used the following materials in 7th grade:

 

 

Selections from The Kingfisher Illustrated History of the World by Charlotte Evans et al.

 

The Young People's Story of Our Heritage: The Ancient World, Pre-history to 500BC by V. M. Hillyer and E. G. Huey

 

The Young People's Story of Our Heritage: The Ancient World, 500BC to 500AD by V. M. Hillyer and E. G. Huey

 

A Bone from a Dry Sea by Peter Dickinson

 

Cave of the Moving Shadows by Thomas Milstead

 

Spirit on the Wall by Ann O'Neal Garcia

 

Mara, Daughter of the Nile by Eloise Jarvis McGraw

 

Pharaoh's Daughter by Julius Lester

 

Video:  David Macaulay's World of Ancient Engineering:   Pyramid

 

Black Ships before Troy by Rosemary Sutcliff

 

Dateline: Troy by Paul Fleischman

 

Inside the Walls of Troy by Clemence McClaren 

 

The Curse of King Tut by Patricia Netzley

 

The Golden Fleece by Padraic Colum

 

Escape from Egypt by Sonia Levitin

 

Troy by Adele Geras   

 

The Wanderings of Odysseus by Rosemary Sutcliff

 

The Cat of Bubastes by G. A. Henty

 

City of Gold and Other Stories from the Old Testament by Peter Dickinson

 

Gods and Goddesses by John Malam

 

The Riddle of the Rosetta Stone by James Cross Giblin

 

Selections from  Cultural Atlas for Young People:  Ancient Greece by Anton Powell

 

Selections from Then and Now by Stefania and Dominic Perring

 

Selections from Usborne Book of Famous Lives

 

Selections from  Heroines by Rebecca Hazell

 

Selections from A Picturesque Tale of Progress, Volume 2 by Olive Beaupre Miller

 

The Story of the World, History for the Classical Child: Ancient Times by Susan W. Bauer

 

Niko: Sculptor's Apprentice by Isabelle Lawrence

 

How Would You Survive as an Ancient Greek? by Fiona Macdonald

 

Calliope Magazine: Taharqo

 

Calliope Magazine: Ancient Celts

 

Alexander the Great by Peter Chrisp

 

Video: Alexander the Great (The History Makers)

 

Men of Athens by Olivia Coolidge

 

Selections from Mathematicians are People, Too by Luetta and Wilbert Reimer

 

Science in Ancient Greece by Kathlyn Gay

 

Selections from A Day in Old Athens by William S. Davis

 

Your Travel Guide to Ancient Greece by Nancy Day

 

The Librarian who Measured the Earth by Kathryn Lasky

 

The Emperor's Silent Army by Jane O'Connor

 

Selections from Ancient Japan by J. E. Kidder

 

Hannibal's Elephants by Alfred Powers

 

The Story of the Romans by H. A. Guerber

 

Galen: My Life in Imperial Rome by Marissa Moss

 

Caesar's Gallic War by Olivia Coolidge

 

Selections from Ancient Inventions by Peter James and Nick Thorpe

 

Video:  Anthony and Cleopatra (Royal Shakespeare Company, 1974)

 

Videos:  I, Claudius (Volumes 1-7)

 

Augustus Caesar's World by Genevieve Foster

 

City by David Macaulay

 

The Wadjet Eye by Jill Rubalcaba

 

Video:  David Macaulay's World of Ancient Engineering:   Roman City

 

Song for a Dark Queen by Rosemary Sutcliff

 

Detectives in Togas by Henry Winterfield

 

Video:  Ancient Mysteries:  Pompeii, Buried Alive

 

The Capricorn Bracelet by Rosemary Sutcliff

 

The Eagle of the Ninth by Rosemary Sutcliff

 

Selections from Wonders of Ancient Chinese Science by Robert Silverberg

 

The White Stag by Kate Seredy

 

Saint George and the Dragon by Margaret Hodges

 

Selections from The Dark Ages by Tony Gregory

 

Lady Ch'iao Kuo:  Warrior of the South by Laurence Yep

 

The Dancing Bear by Peter Dickinson

 

Video:  Africa (Ancient Civilizations for Children)

 

The Cartoon History of the Universe II, From the Springtime of China to the Fall of Rome by Larry Gonick

 

Regards,
Kareni


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#13 Kareni

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Posted 26 April 2016 - 06:27 PM

If you are interested in seeing the materials we used in subsequent years -- 500AD to 1700AD in eighth, and 1700AD to 2000AD in ninth grade -- let me know and I'll post those lists.

 

Regards,

Kareni


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#14 kand

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Posted 28 April 2016 - 01:56 PM

If you are interested in seeing the materials we used in subsequent years -- 500AD to 1700AD in eighth, and 1700AD to 2000AD in ninth grade -- let me know and I'll post those lists.

Regards,
Kareni


I almost missed your replies and am so glad I didn't! Thank you so much for sharing all this! I wish I'd gone with exactly this plan (starting in 7th) for my oldest. She is a voracious reader as well, and this would have worked wonderfully and been more interesting than what we did instead. I know from past posts, I always see things your daughter did that I wish/want to do with my oldest. I think this general idea would actually work well for my 2nd dd as well, though I expect she will read far fewer books than my older would have. She reads a lot, but is not crazy fast like her sister and doesn't read as much non-fiction. We had already come to the idea a couple days ago that we would operate on a more casual plan for history for her next year, and I would make a big reading list for her to choose from, and then she would have some choices for output she could do to share what she learned. She's doing that right now to finish the school year, since she finished the history program she was using, and she seems to thrive on that kind of independence in her learning, rather than feeling like I'm controlling everything. I really like how you laid out the expectations clearly, but then your dd had the freedom to choose how she was going to meet those.

I would love to see your other lists, if it's not too much trouble. My dd really wants to do middle ages next year, so I'm going to start her there.

Actually, you may be able to help answer another question that's been on my mind, since you mentioned Gonick. When you made your dd's reading list for colleges (did you do a reading list?), how did you decide what books merited making it on the list? My oldest has read a couple Gonick cartoon histories this year, and she likes to read some other pop-type non fiction, like The Physics of Superheroes, For the Love of Physics, An Astronauts Guide to Life on Earth, and other books like that which aren't literature and also aren't deep non-fiction, but are nonetheless very educational and she's learning from them. Do you put books like that on your reading list?

Edited by kand, 28 April 2016 - 02:28 PM.

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#15 Kareni

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Posted 28 April 2016 - 03:23 PM

I would love to see your other lists, if it's not too much trouble. My dd really wants to do middle ages next year, so I'm going to start her there.

 

Let me start with this before getting to your other questions/statements.

 

 

Here's the mega list of resources that my daughter used when she was in 8th grade (quite some moons ago).  Since she'd only begun homeschooling in 7th grade, she was on the second year of a three year sweep through world history and was studying the time period AD500 to AD 1700.  The list includes books, videos and music.  She was/is a speedy reader so she read many more books than others might.

 

Asterisked entries were used only in part.

 

 

Eighth Grade History Reading and Resource List

 

Dorling Kindersley History of the World edited by Plantagenet Somerset Fry **

The Story of Mankind by Hendrik Willem van Loon  **

The Story of Mankind:  A Picturesque Tale of Progress by Olive Beaupre Miller **

The Hollow Hills by Mary Stewart

The Man Who Loved Books by Jean Fritz

Across a Dark and Wild Sea by Don Brown

The Sword in the Stone by T. H. White

Brendan the Navigator by Jean Fritz

The Illustrated History of the World, Vol. 3, Rome and the Classical West by J. M. Roberts **

The Mists of Avalon by Marion Zimmer Bradley – audio (Vol. 1)

The Brendan Voyage by Tim Severin **

Then and Now by Stefania and Dominic Perring **

I am Mordred by Nancy Springer

The Illustrated History of the World, Vol. 4, The Age of Diverging Traditions by J. M. Roberts **

Tusk and Stone by Malcolm Bosse

Muhammad by Demi

The Shining Company by Rosemary Sutcliff

The Real Middle Earth by Brian Bates **

The Middle Ages by Mike Corbishley **

Beowulf the Warrior  by Ian Serraillier

Beowulf: A New Telling by Robert Nye

The Collected Beowulf by Gareth Hinds

Maples in the Mist by Minfong Ho

Ancient Cliff Dwellers of Mesa Verde by Caroline Arnold

The Arabian Nights retold by Neil Philip

The Age of Chivalry edited by Merle Severy **

His Majesty’s Elephant by Judith Tarr

Charlemagne and the Early Middle Ages by Miriam Greenblatt

Prison Window, Jerusalem Blue by Bruce Clements

Norse Gods and Giants by Ingri and Edgar Parin D’Aulaire

The Real Vikings by Melvin and Gilda Berger

Medieval Knights by Trevor Cairns **

Otto of the Silver Hand by Howard Pyle

The Story of Science:  Aristotle Leads the Way by Joy Hakim  **

The Edge on the Sword by Rebecca Tingle

Alfred the Great and the Saxons by Robin May

The Time Traveler Book of Viking Raiders by Anne Civardi and James Graham-Campbell

Blood Feud by Rosemary Sutcliff

The Song Dynasty by Scott Ingram

Hakon of Rogen’s Saga by Erik Haugaard

Early Explorers of North America by C. Keith Wilbur **

The Cartoon History of the Universe III by Larry Gonick

Fafnir by Bernard Evslin

The King’s Shadow by Elizabeth Alder

1000 Years Ago on Planet Earth by Sneed Collard

The Legend of the Cid by Robert Goldston

Shakespeare Stories by Leon Garfield **

Shakespeare and MacBeth:  The Story Behind the Play by James Barter

Shakespeare’s MacBeth  (video)

William the Conqueror by Thomas B. Costain

Anna of Byzantium by Tracy Barrett

A Travel Guide to Medieval Constantinople by James Barter

Robin Hood by Neil Philip

A Proud Taste for Scarlet and Miniver by E. L. Konigsburg

Daily Life in the Middle Ages by Paul B. Newman **

Brother Cadfael videos: A Morbid Taste for Bones and Monk’s Hood

Tales of the Crusades by Olivia Coolidge

A Single Shard by Linda Sue Park

Saladin by Diane Stanley

In a Dark Wood by Michael Cadnum

The Story of the Wise Men by Regine Pernoud and Canon Grivot

Canticles of Ecstasy (the music of Hildegard von Bingen) by Sequentia

The Magna Charta by James H. Daugherty

Marvels of Science by Kendall Haven **

The Road to Damietta by Scott O’Dell

Eyewitness Medieval Life by Andrew Langley

Music of the Gothic Era (The Early Music Consort of London/David Munrow)

Brother Sun, Sister Moon (video) (Wertmuller and Zeffirelli)

Book of the Lion by Michael Cadnum

Angkor:  Heart of an Asian Empire by Bruno Dagens **

Sir Walter Scott’s Ivanhoe (video, BBC production)

Quest for a Maid by Frances Hendry

Castle by David Macaulay

The Ramsay Scallop by Frances Temple

Girl in a Cage by Jane Yolen

Archers, Alchemists, and 98 Other Jobs You Might Have Loved or Loathed by Priscilla Galloway

The King’s Swift Rider by Mollie Hunter

Marco Polo:  To China and Back by Steven Otfinoski

Cathedral by David Macaulay

The Canterbury Tales by Geoffrey Chaucer as retold by Geraldine McCaughrean

Geoffrey Chaucer’s The Canterbury Tales (read by Prunella Scales and Martin Starkie)**

Dog of the Bondi Castle by Lynn Hall

Harold the Herald by Dana Fradon

Traveling Man:  The Journey of Ibn Battuta, 1325-1354 by James Rumford

The Inferno of Dante (cantos 1 – 5) translated by Robert Pinsky

Beckett (video, 1964)

The Lion in Winter (video, 1968)

A Distant Mirror by Barbara Tuchman **

The Black Arrow by Robert Louis Stevenson

The Trumpeter of Krakow by Eric P. Kelly

The Second Mrs. Giaconda by E. L. Konigsburg

Rats, Bulls, and Flying Machines by Deborah Prum

The Passion of Joan of Arc (video, 1928, Carl Th. Dreyer)

1492:  Music from the Age of Discovery by The Waverly Consort 

The Cargo of the Madalena by Cynthia Harnett

1492:  The Year of the New World by Piero Ventura

The Prince and the Pauper by Mark Twain

Great Painters by Piero Ventura **

Accidental Explorers by Rebecca Stefoff **

Greensleeves:  A Collection of English Lute Songs by Julianne Baird and Ronn McFarlane

Beware, Princess Elizabeth by Carolyn Meyer

The Sea King:  Sir Francis Drake and His Times by Albert Marrin

Elizabeth R:  The Lion’s Cub (video, BBC production, 1971)

Elizabeth (video, 1998, with Cate Blanchett)

Den of the White Fox by Lensey Namioka

From Coronado to Escalante:  The Explorers of the Spanish Southwest by John Miller Morris

Cantos 1 – 5 of Fierce Wars and Faithful Loves:  A retelling of Edmund Spenser’s The Faerie Queene, Book 1 by Roy Maynard

On the Banks of the Helicon:  Early Music of Scotland by the Baltimore Consort

The Inquisition (video, The History Channel, 1996)

The Adventures of Don Quixote de la Mancha by Miguel de Cervantes (adapted by Leighton Barret)

The World of Captain John Smith by Genevieve Foster **

The World of Lully by the Chicago Baroque Ensemble

John Bunyan’s Pilgrim’s Progress retold by Gary D. Schmidt

I, Juan de Pareja by Elizabeth Borton de Trevino

Dowland:  Ayres and Lute Lessons by the Deller Consort

Out of Many Waters by Jacqueline Dembar Greene

The Trial and Execution of Charles I by Leonard W. Cowie

Rembrandt by Ceciel de Bie and Martijn Leenen

The Reduced Shakespeare Company (video, Acorn Media, 2003)

Witch Child by Celia Rees

At the Sign of the Sugared Plum by Mary Hooper

Vivaldi’s Ring of Mystery:  A Tale of Venice and Violins (audio)

Girl with a Pearl Earring (video, 2003)

 

Regards,

Kareni


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#16 Kareni

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Posted 28 April 2016 - 03:25 PM

In 9th grade, we used a hodgepodge of materials when my daughter covered the time period 1700 to 2000. Here are the resources (non-fiction, literature, videos and music) that we used.   Be aware that we are fairly liberal so some materials might not suit all families.

 

Ninth Grade History and Literature Resource List

World History the Easy Way, Volume 2 by Charles Frazee

American History the Easy Way by William Kellogg

World History Map Activities by Marvin Scott

 

Poor Richard’s Almanack by Benjamin Franklin
George Washington, Spymaster by Thomas B. Allen
Tomaso Albinoni – 12 Concerti a cinque Op. 5
Roots by Alex Haley (to p. 126)
Georg Philipp Telemann – Suite A Minor, 2 Double Concertos (Michala Petri, Academy of St. Martin-in-the Fields)
Amadeus (video)
"A Modest Proposal" by Jonathan Swift
George Washington’s World by Genevieve Foster
The Scarlet Pimpernel by Baroness Emmuska Orczy
I Will Repay by Baroness Emmuska Orczy
Eldorado by Baroness Emmuska Orczy
Sir Percy Hits Back by Baroness Emmuska Orczy
The Scarlet Pimpernel (three part video, BBC)
Carl Friedrich Abel – Symphonies Op. 10, numbers 1 – 6, La Stagione
Francesco Geminiani – 12 Concerti Grossi, I Musici
The Art of the Fugue by Bach, Emerson String Quartet
Frankenstein by Mary Shelley
Longitude (video, A&E)
C.S. Forester’s Horatio Hornblower (set of 8 videos, A&E)
Lock, Stock, and Barrel by Donald Sobol
Ludwig van Beethoven – Symphonies 5 in C Minor, Op. 67, and 6 in F Major, Op. 68, Pastoral
"Midnight Ride of Paul Revere" by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow
Cartouche (video)
Joseph Haydn – String Quartets, Op. 17, Nos. 1, 2, and 4, Kodaly Quartet
Les Miserables by Victor Hugo (translated by Norman Denny)
The New Nation by Joy Hakim
A Tale of Two Cities (video)
Georges Bizet – Carmen Suites No. 1 and No. 2; L’Arlesienne Suites No. 1 and No. 2, Leonard Bernstein
Adolphe Adam – Giselle, conducted by Richard Bonynge, Orchestra of the Royal Opera House
Anton Bruckner – Symphony No. 4 “Romantic”, conducted by Eugen Jochum, Berlin Philharmonic Orchestra
Men-of-War: Life in Nelson's Navy by Patrick O'Brian
Young Frankenstein (video)
Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein (video with Kenneth Branagh)
Lily Afshar -- A Jug of Wine and Thou (Persian music)
Rifles for Watie by Harold Keith
Master and Commander (video)
Chamber Works by Women Composers, The Macalester Trio
Commodore Perry in the Land of the Shogun by Rhoda Blumberg
Wassail! Wassail! Early American Christmas Music by the Revels
"An Occurrence at the Owl Creek Bridge" by Ambrose Bierce
The Devil’s Dictionary by Ambrose Bierce
Stephen Foster’s Civil War Songs (sung by Linda Russell)

The Century for Young People by Peter Jennings and Todd Brewster
Critical Thinking in United States History, Book Four, Spanish-American War to Vietnam War by Kevin O’Reilly
Peter Ilyich Tchaikovsky, Sleeping Beauty, Swan Lake and Nutcracker, Berliner Philharmoniker, Mstislav Rostropovich conducting
Winsor McCay: The Master Edition (The Sinking of the Lusitania)
Claude Debussy: La Mer, Nocturnes, Jeux, The Cleveland Orchestra, Pierre Boulez conducting
The Battleship Potemkin (video)
“Broadway, Blues, and Truth” from RESPECT: A Century of Women in Music
Botchan by Soseki Natsume (translated by Umeji Sasaki)
Many Lives, Many Stories by Kathryn Abbott and Patricia Minter
Witness by Karen Hesse
Influenza 1918 (video from PBS)
New Orleans Rhythm Kings and Jelly Roll Morton
Antarctica by Walter Dean Myers
War Game by Michael Foreman
Mao Tse-Tung and His China by Albert Marrin
“The Butcher Boy”, “The Garage” and “Rough House” from The Best Arbuckle Keaton Collection (video)
Fluffy Ruffle Girls: Women in Ragtime
All Quiet on the Western Front by Erich Maria Remarque
Charles A. Lindbergh: A Human Hero by James Cross Giblin
Inherit the Wind (video)
Pygmalion by George Bernard Shaw
All Quiet on the Western Front (video)
The Depression and New Deal by Robert McElvaine
Cabaret (video)
Radio Comedy Classics: Jack Benny Program and Fred Allen Show
Surviving Hitler by Andrea Warren
Maus I and Maus II by Art Spiegelman
Rabbit-Proof Fence (video)
The Verse by the Side of the Road by Frank Ransome, Jr.
Elvis Presley title album
Aaron Copland, Appalachian Spring, Rodeo, Billy the Kid, Fanfare for the Common Man (New York Philharmonic, Leonard Bernstein)
1940s House (video)
Diary of Anne Frank
North to Freedom by Anne Holm
Shane (video)
Frank Sinatra, Come Swing with Me
Animal Farm by George Orwell
The Little World of Don Camillo by Giovanni Guareschi
Ed Sullivan’s Rock and Roll Classics, Volume 8: Legends of Rock (video)
Beatles, Beatles for Sale
Atomic Café (video)
Bob Dylan, Highway 61 Revisited
“I Have a Dream” by Martin Luther King, Jr.
All the President's Men (video)
Forrest Gump (video)
Judy Collins, Whales and Nightingales
Hair (video)
The Vietnam War by Marilyn B. Young, John J. Fitzgerald and A. Tom Grunfeld
Singers and Songwriters, 1974-1975
Good Morning, Vietnam (video)
Out of the Silent Planet by C. S. Lewis
The Mouse that Roared by Leonard Wibberley
The Mouse that Roared (video)
Abba, The Definitive Collection
W;t by Margaret Edson
W;t (video)
Persepolis by Marjane Satrapi
Fax from Sarajevo by Joe Kubert
U2, Achtung Baby
A Little History of the World by E. H. Gombrich

Regards,
Kareni


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#17 Kareni

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Posted 28 April 2016 - 03:44 PM

I almost missed your replies and am so glad I didn't! Thank you so much for sharing all this!

 

I'm happy to help.

 

Actually, you may be able to help answer another question that's been on my mind, since you mentioned Gonick. When you made your dd's reading list for colleges (did you do a reading list?), how did you decide what books merited making it on the list? My oldest has read a couple Gonick cartoon histories this year, and she likes to read some other pop-type non fiction, like The Physics of Superheroes, For the Love of Physics, An Astronauts Guide to Life on Earth, and other books like that which aren't literature and also aren't deep non-fiction, but are nonetheless very educational and she's learning from them. Do you put books like that on your reading list?

 

I did indeed send a reading list with my daughter's paperwork (i.e., transcript, counselor letter, profile and course descriptions). We sorted her list into categories such as:

Fiction

Non-fiction

Essays

Fantasy (a favorite genre of hers)

Latin works (This included authors such as Ovid and Catullus as well as books such as Virent Ova! Viret Perna! by Dr. Seuss, Ferdinandus Taurus by Munro Leaf, and Asterix Olympius by Rene de Goscinny. Since she was planning to major in Latin and/or the Classics, we thought this showed her interest.)

We included titles and author names but also shortened the list by having items such as: The Scarlet Pimpernel by Baroness Emmuska Orczy plus six sequels.

We did not include everything she had read for pleasure in high school -- for example, we did not include any manga (though she had read an abundance) nor did we include Calvin & Hobbes or Zits. We did include titles that had been assigned reading.

I also included a list of textbooks used since I did not include book titles in her course descriptions.

When my daughter looked over her reading list, there were a number of books whose contents she no longer remembered clearly. Many of these she had read in ninth grade. She elected to eliminate them so that she would not be put in an awkward position. We imagined an interviewer looking over the list and saying, "Oh, Vaguest, Dimmest Memories is a favorite title of mine. What did you like best about it?" And, yes, she was asked about some of her reading choices when she interviewed.

 

My advice would be to keep track of everything your daughter is reading and then decide later what to include and how to categorize it.

 

Since you're clearly thinking ahead, let me post the course descriptions I created for history and literature for my daughter's ninth grade year.  I submitted such course descriptions to each of the colleges to which my daughter applied.

 

 

World Literature from 1700 to 2000
A study of 18th through 20th century short stories and novels with the intent of familiarizing the student with selected literary works of enduring quality. This interdisciplinary course (see the associated History course below) allows the student to explore this time period by reading its literature while also studying its historical context. (Class taken at home in 9th grade.) Awarded 0.50 credits.

(She did several other things that year for language arts, so I only gave 0.50 credits for the above.)

 

 

World History from 1700 to 2000
This reading-based course covers world-changing events of the 18th through 20th centuries which have shaped our culture today; it complements the associated Literature course (listed above) by giving the student a context for the literature studied. The course also includes musical recordings, documentaries, and videos of or about the time. Map work and short writing assignments are required. (Class taken at home in 9th grade.) Awarded 1.00 credits.

 

 

Also, I'd be happy to share copies of my daughter's course descriptions, reading list, and transcript.  If you (or others) are interested, simply send me a personal message with your email address and I'll send them along.

 

Regards,

Kareni


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#18 kand

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Posted 28 April 2016 - 08:05 PM


 

 

Also, I'd be happy to share copies of my daughter's course descriptions, reading list, and transcript.  If you (or others) are interested, simply send me a personal message with your email address and I'll send them along.

 

 

I already have her course descriptions you sent to me many months back :001_smile: . What major did she end up in? I can't remember if you told me at the time, but I was trying to guess from her course descriptions. Your dd's list made me wish I'd gone more with my dd's interests and less with following the standard course of study for my oldest's first two years. Trying to change that for next year. I may send you a message to see how you did her transcript and formatted her reading list, though.

 

Thank you!


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#19 happypamama

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Posted 28 April 2016 - 08:28 PM

Just as an FYI, we use History Odyssey, but instead of the van Loon book, we use the k12 Human Odyssey books for middle school, plus Kingfisher.


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#20 Kareni

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Posted 29 April 2016 - 10:50 AM

I already have her course descriptions you sent to me many months back :001_smile: . What major did she end up in? I can't remember if you told me at the time, but I was trying to guess from her course descriptions. Your dd's list made me wish I'd gone more with my dd's interests and less with following the standard course of study for my oldest's first two years. Trying to change that for next year. I may send you a message to see how you did her transcript and formatted her reading list, though.

 

Yes, do feel free to send a personal message, kand.

 

My daughter ended up majoring in Latin and minoring in Geology.  She loved her time in college and is now teaching English to adults in South Korea -- the obvious thing to do when you've majored in Latin!

 

Regards,

Kareni



#21 kand

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Posted 29 April 2016 - 11:09 AM

My daughter ended up majoring in Latin and minoring in Geology. She loved her time in college and is now teaching English to adults in South Korea -- the obvious thing to do when you've majored in Latin!

Lol!
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#22 aprilleigh

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Posted 15 May 2017 - 05:07 PM

Some nice lists here - will have to go through them later