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What does "sanctification" mean to you?


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#1 saraha

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Posted 19 January 2014 - 02:29 PM

We had a guest preacher this morning that has sparked a conversation around our dinner table today.  He talked about sanctification and I was unfamiliar with this term.  What does "sanctification" mean to you, and what church/denomination do you associate yourself with?

 

Thanks



#2 Jean in Newcastle

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Posted 19 January 2014 - 02:34 PM

Sanctification means to "be set apart, to be made holy".  It is a process that starts at salvation (when we are sanctified) but which continues all the way until we are in heaven when we get resurrection bodies and are totally sanctified.  

 

Nondenominational protestant.  



#3 Embassy

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Posted 19 January 2014 - 02:48 PM

Sanctification is holiness/perfection.  I believe that sanctification happens the moment you are born again.  This holiness is a gift.  It isn't our holiness, but Jesus' holiness.  The process of acting holy is a different matter.  As Christians mature they should act more and more like who they already are.    

 

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#4 DawnM

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Posted 19 January 2014 - 03:27 PM

Agreeing with the others.  Sanctification means to be set apart.  You are a child of God, a person cleansed by Jesus' sacrifice on the cross.  

 

I grew up Holiness (Free Methodist/Nazarene)

I am now a member of a Southern Baptist Church



#5 PeachyDoodle

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Posted 19 January 2014 - 04:57 PM

Agree with the above, for the most part. I tend to see sanctification as more of a process that takes the remainder of our earthly lives and is not fully realized until heaven. It's the process of becoming more and more like Christ. But while it's not instantaneous, it's also not an optional outcome, but an inevitable reality. D. Martyn Lloyd-Jones said:

 

"You cannot receive Christ as your justification only, and then, later, decide to refuse or to accept Him as your sanctification. He is one and indivisible, and if you receive Him at all, at once He is made unto you 'wisdom and righteousness and sanctification and redemption.' You cannot receive Him as your Saviour only, and later decide to accept or refuse Him as your Lord; for the Saviour is the Lord who by His death has [bought] us and therefore owns us. Sanctification is nowhere taught or offered in the New Testament as some additional experience possible to the believer. It is represented rather as something which is already within the believer, something which he must realise more and more and in which he must grow increasingly."

 

I will also add that I believe sanctification is as fully a product of grace as justification. IOW, it is a result of God working in us, renewing our minds and transforming us more and more into his image, not a result of "trying harder." I say this because I've heard WAY too much morality-centered preaching that says, "you gotta, you gotta, you gotta" and not nearly enough that says, "Jesus did, Jesus did, Jesus did." That seems to me to be directly related to the misunderstanding that post-conversion Christians are somehow responsible for their own sanctification.

 

I am United Methodist, although my views on sanctification are probably more informed by the Reformed traditions. Wesley was well known for preaching Christian perfectionism, a model to which I simply cannot subscribe. My pastor may or may not endorse my answer. :001_smile:



#6 Slache

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Posted 19 January 2014 - 04:59 PM

A growing in holiness by the grace of God, which marks a believers life.

 

Baptist (reformed, creationist)

 

I just praise God for who He is.  That He is so kind.  That He is always working to sanctify us, to change us, to mold us. ~Paul Washer



#7 Whereneverever

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Posted 19 January 2014 - 05:15 PM

The effects of God's word in man, and spiritual growth following justification. http://cyclopedia.lc...=SANCTIFICATION

#8 poppy

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Posted 19 January 2014 - 05:18 PM

Kind of like a Protestant version of beautification ?

#9 saraha

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Posted 19 January 2014 - 05:40 PM

The preacher we heard today was an "old timey" Nazarene preacher (his term)

He preached that sanctification is an act that happens when a person is convicted by God, after having asked for salvation,  to become sinless, and that without sanctification, you cannot get into heaven.  He said this was in alignment with Holiness church teachings, that sanctification is a separate act that cleanses you from all sin, and that after sanctification you can live a sinless life unless you choose to sin.

 

We have attended this Nazarene church for 9 years, and this was honestly the first time I had heard about this separate step that you need to accomplish.  He used Galations 5 to back this up, and stated that this teaching isn't stressed enough in todays church (meaning holiness churches)  Am I giving a summary that sounds familiar?  I am wondering how widespread this belief is and if I had just missed this important teaching.  I did not grow up in the church, so I don't have any religious background, so that may explain why I had not heard of this? Do holiness churches still subscribe to this teaching, and our church is maybe an exception?

 

Incidentally, my husband does not agree with the above teaching and we had a long talk about it with the kids over dinner this afternoon.



#10 sbgrace

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Posted 19 January 2014 - 06:17 PM

I grew up in a Free Methodist church, so heard about sanctification. I believed that salvation was choosing to be in relationship with God, and so entering into eternal life both now and after death, on the basis of that choice. Then, a saved person would be naturally drawn to be wholly given to God in all areas, which is sanctification. This would be starting at the salvation point, and was just the start of a life-long process of allowing the Holy Spirit to transform us. I figured all Christians would be cooperating with the transformational work the Holy Spirit does in our lives, whether they call it sanctification or have never heard of the term, just because His Spirit in us draws us into further relationship.

 

However, I was also taught that there will come a point where a person being transformed makes an absolute decision to surrender their will entirely to God, and that was the complete sanctification point. I do not consider a person perfect at that point. I think the doctrine of complete/entire sanctification would say it is possible, in cooperation with the Holy Spirit, to be free of willful and deliberate sin on earth. I believe Wesley taught that, and imagine it was what the pastor today was saying in terms of being sinless via sanctification. I do not believe Wesley or any denomination taught that a person wasn't saved until that point, though.  And when it is taught in other denominational contexts, I'm thinking of Victory through Surrender by E. Stanley Jones, the concepts of surrendering to His Lordship I heard in a college group led by a Baptist minister, a call to dedicate all of the self to Christ I heard in a non-denominational church etc., it was still the same thing my upbringing called entire or complete sanctification.

 

 

 

He preached that sanctification is an act that happens when a person is convicted by God, after having asked for salvation,  to become sinless, and that without sanctification, you cannot get into heaven.

 

If your understanding is what he was trying to communicate, I abhor that vision of God. I think I would have found it scary as a child! I wouldn't want my kids to hear what yours did today. As an adult I find it absolutely incompatible with what I see in Christ, who is the exact representation of God. So ick. Of course, I heard a Nazarene pastor say from the pulpit that if he had argument with his wife, walked out in selfish anger, and was hit by a car he would go to hell. From that perspective, it doesn't surprise me that someone might preach the above! At the time, I termed it eternal insecurity. The above fits well with that line of thinking! I don't believe it's biblical, but maybe he was trying to say something different than what was communicated.



#11 Julie Smith

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Posted 19 January 2014 - 06:23 PM

I keep skipping past your post since I didn't even know what sanctification means - I just gave a wild guess it had something to do with the church.

 

But thanks to you I have this song in my head ... 

 



#12 momoflaw

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Posted 19 January 2014 - 06:24 PM

Does this help?  I know it's wikipedia but it seems to talk about what you heard today.

 

http://en.wikipedia..../Sanctification

 

ETA: Gosh, don't know where that Franklin Planner site came in lol.  Fixed it.



#13 PeachyDoodle

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Posted 19 January 2014 - 06:25 PM

The preacher we heard today was an "old timey" Nazarene preacher (his term)

He preached that sanctification is an act that happens when a person is convicted by God, after having asked for salvation,  to become sinless, and that without sanctification, you cannot get into heaven.  He said this was in alignment with Holiness church teachings, that sanctification is a separate act that cleanses you from all sin, and that after sanctification you can live a sinless life unless you choose to sin.

 

We have attended this Nazarene church for 9 years, and this was honestly the first time I had heard about this separate step that you need to accomplish.  He used Galations 5 to back this up, and stated that this teaching isn't stressed enough in todays church (meaning holiness churches)  Am I giving a summary that sounds familiar?  I am wondering how widespread this belief is and if I had just missed this important teaching.  I did not grow up in the church, so I don't have any religious background, so that may explain why I had not heard of this? Do holiness churches still subscribe to this teaching, and our church is maybe an exception?

 

Incidentally, my husband does not agree with the above teaching and we had a long talk about it with the kids over dinner this afternoon.

 

IIRC, the Nazarene church comes from the Wesleyan-holiness tradition, in which case this would be directly related to Wesley's perfectionism teaching, which I referenced above. I can't speak to whether or not most Nazarene churches still subscribe to the teaching, but certainly the Wesley brothers have had a strong influence on several denominations. I think the official Methodist doctrine probably doesn't take it quite to this extreme, but I would have to do some research on that.

 

[PS... I admit that my gut reaction to the bolded is, "Good luck with that." ;) ]
 



#14 Slache

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Posted 19 January 2014 - 06:40 PM

Sanctification is not required for salvation, it is fruit of salvation. It's an act of God.

 

"For by grace are ye saved through faith; and that not of yourselves: it is the gift of God: Not of works, lest any man should boast." -Eph 2:8-9

 

"He which hath begun a good work in you will perform it until the day of Jesus Chris." Phil 1:6



#15 Cafelattee

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Posted 19 January 2014 - 07:27 PM

The preacher we heard today was an "old timey" Nazarene preacher (his term)

He preached that sanctification is an act that happens when a person is convicted by God, after having asked for salvation,  to become sinless, and that without sanctification, you cannot get into heaven.  He said this was in alignment with Holiness church teachings, that sanctification is a separate act that cleanses you from all sin, and that after sanctification you can live a sinless life unless you choose to sin.

 

We have attended this Nazarene church for 9 years, and this was honestly the first time I had heard about this separate step that you need to accomplish.  He used Galations 5 to back this up, and stated that this teaching isn't stressed enough in todays church (meaning holiness churches)  Am I giving a summary that sounds familiar?  I am wondering how widespread this belief is and if I had just missed this important teaching.  I did not grow up in the church, so I don't have any religious background, so that may explain why I had not heard of this? Do holiness churches still subscribe to this teaching, and our church is maybe an exception?

 

Incidentally, my husband does not agree with the above teaching and we had a long talk about it with the kids over dinner this afternoon.

 

My father is this type of Nazarene.  I grew up with the type preaching.   I'm now a nondenominational protestant.   When raised with this type of teaching is very "lacking of grace"   I had lots of rules (you really need to find a old Nazarene book of doctrine)  I believe you would be surprised.

 

I always believed in God even as a child.  I hit my teens and just couldn't live the Nazarene (Christian life) so I pretty much told my parents that I'm doing what I want and chose (going to hell) verses being a Christian.

 

It took be until age of 30 to know Gods unconditional grace.  I then had no doubt I was a Christian matter of fact before that heart change I did not consider myself a christen (yes I believed) in trinity but I didn't feel a heart change (which felt like a whole heart peace)  It was some years later as I was growing in my Christian walk that I went through some personal struggle (which I was trying to do on my own and not relying on God )  I then had another  what I call my "sanctification"  I then totally wanted to walk with God.  I know longer was being a Christian but wanting my life my way where I did what I wanted and ignored convictions. 

 

Now the difference from my parents old Nazarene belief and mine is that I will never be prefect.  I will never be sinless this side of heaven.  I do feel that my walk in life shows the holy spirits grace in my life.  The best think people have said to me was not you must be a christen.  Its they  tell me they feel drawn to me.  I have a since of peace, love and acceptance for others.  This to me is what Jesus wanted all Christians to become.  We are to be a light in the world.  WE should be at peace in all situation that people come to use wanting to know what we have.  

 

So anyway that's my take on sanctification.  I do believe for myself its was 2 different  events.  I really haven't discuss this with anyone else.  I figure you don't have to have a name for growing closer to God.   I'm just a Christian  walking in full faith



#16 saraha

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Posted 19 January 2014 - 08:32 PM

Thank you all so much for your input!  It has been enlightening.



#17 shanvan

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Posted 19 January 2014 - 09:56 PM

The teaching you heard is very closely tied to the idea of the teaching of a 'second blessing'.  I believe I've heard Charles Stanley mention he has received it.  It's not an idea our family agrees with; we agree with Jean's explanation.  I have yet to meet a perfect person.

 

Here's a link to an article about 'second blessing' doctrine.  I do not know this church at all, I found the article by googling.

 

http://www.bbcmorehe...ndex.php?id=446

 



#18 DawnM

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Posted 19 January 2014 - 10:02 PM

This is one thing I NEVER agreed with the Nazarene church about and I knew many in the Nazarene church who would disagree that this is necessary for salvation.

 

I firmly believe that all we need for salvation is given at the point of salvation.  

 

Dawn

 

 

The preacher we heard today was an "old timey" Nazarene preacher (his term)

He preached that sanctification is an act that happens when a person is convicted by God, after having asked for salvation,  to become sinless, and that without sanctification, you cannot get into heaven.  He said this was in alignment with Holiness church teachings, that sanctification is a separate act that cleanses you from all sin, and that after sanctification you can live a sinless life unless you choose to sin.

 

We have attended this Nazarene church for 9 years, and this was honestly the first time I had heard about this separate step that you need to accomplish.  He used Galations 5 to back this up, and stated that this teaching isn't stressed enough in todays church (meaning holiness churches)  Am I giving a summary that sounds familiar?  I am wondering how widespread this belief is and if I had just missed this important teaching.  I did not grow up in the church, so I don't have any religious background, so that may explain why I had not heard of this? Do holiness churches still subscribe to this teaching, and our church is maybe an exception?

 

Incidentally, my husband does not agree with the above teaching and we had a long talk about it with the kids over dinner this afternoon.

 



#19 Laurie4b

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Posted 20 January 2014 - 08:14 AM

In my own words, so probably not theologically precise:  sanctification is the process by which your salvation shows up in your daily life. I do not believe in sinless perfection in this life , but there should be growth: First quote is ESV; second is KJV:

 

And we all, with unveiled face, beholding the glory of the Lord, are being transformed into the same image from one degree of glory to another. For this comes from the Lord who is the Spirit. 2 Cor 3:18   But we all, with open face beholding as in a glass the glory of the Lord, are changed into the same image from glory to glory, even as by the Spirit of the Lord.

 

One interesting thought I had when looking at this verse is that the transformation happens through seeing. It's consistent with 1 John 3:2 as well: Beloved, we are God's children now, and what we will be has not yet appeared; but we know that when he appears[a] we shall be like him, because we shall see him as he is.

 

So here, we are changed significantly when we enter the family of God; we change from "glory to glory" in a process as we behold Christ, but we will be transformed entirely when we see him face-to-face in all his glory.  Just some thoughts.



#20 marbel

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Posted 20 January 2014 - 08:29 AM

My denomination (Orthodox Presbyterian) uses the Westminster Confession and the Shorter Catechism, which defines sanctification as "the work of God's free grace, whereby we are renewed in the whole man after the image of God, and are enabled more and more to die unto sin, and live unto righteousness."    (question 35)

 

It's a process which begins at the point of Justification:  "Justification is an act of God's free grace, wherein he pardoneth all our sins, and accepteth us as righteous in his sight, only for the righteousness of Christ imputed to us, and received by faith alone."  (question 33)



#21 mmeblue

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Posted 20 January 2014 - 10:09 AM

I belong to an Orthodox Presbyterian church as well, and wanted to add that the First Catechism my little ones are learning says this:

 

57. How does God sanctify you?
God makes me more and more holy in heart and conduct.

 

Sometimes it's easier to process than the Shorter Catechism! :)

 

Also, our associate pastor has been working through a book on sanctification with us in our adult Sunday School class.  Just in case it's of interest to you, this is the book: http://www.amazon.co...actice holiness

 

 



#22 saraha

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Posted 20 January 2014 - 01:07 PM

Thanks everybody, you all are confirming what we already thought as a family.  I find it strange though that we have been attending a Nazarene church faithfully for 9 years and through two pastors and this was the first time we had heard of it.



#23 CAMom

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Posted 20 January 2014 - 01:12 PM

We had a guest preacher this morning that has sparked a conversation around our dinner table today.  He talked about sanctification and I was unfamiliar with this term.  What does "sanctification" mean to you, and what church/denomination do you associate yourself with?

 

Thanks

 

I'm going to answer before reading the other posts.

 

Sanctification is the process by which the Holy Spirit works through a Christian to transform her further into the image of Christ during her lifetime on earth.

 

I associate myself as a Presbyterian affiliated with the Presbyterian Church in America (PCA).



#24 CAMom

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Posted 20 January 2014 - 01:15 PM

 

 

I am United Methodist, although my views on sanctification are probably more informed by the Reformed traditions. Wesley was well known for preaching Christian perfectionism, a model to which I simply cannot subscribe. My pastor may or may not endorse my answer. :001_smile:

 

Yeah...that's a pretty Reformed view of sanctification you've got there. :D



#25 albeto.

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Posted 20 January 2014 - 01:27 PM

The preacher we heard today was an "old timey" Nazarene preacher (his term)

He preached that sanctification is an act that happens when a person is convicted by God, after having asked for salvation,  to become sinless, and that without sanctification, you cannot get into heaven.  He said this was in alignment with Holiness church teachings, that sanctification is a separate act that cleanses you from all sin, and that after sanctification you can live a sinless life unless you choose to sin.

 

We have attended this Nazarene church for 9 years, and this was honestly the first time I had heard about this separate step that you need to accomplish.  He used Galations 5 to back this up, and stated that this teaching isn't stressed enough in todays church (meaning holiness churches)  Am I giving a summary that sounds familiar?  I am wondering how widespread this belief is and if I had just missed this important teaching.  I did not grow up in the church, so I don't have any religious background, so that may explain why I had not heard of this? Do holiness churches still subscribe to this teaching, and our church is maybe an exception?

 

Incidentally, my husband does not agree with the above teaching and we had a long talk about it with the kids over dinner this afternoon.

 

On another homeschooling forum I was a part of, this argument was often presented by some who considered themselves "mature Christians." When pressed, they would explain that sometimes they would "stumble," but never "sin." There are all kinds of bible verses and whole theologies that support this. When I was a Catholic I understood it to be a process that would culminate in purgatory (again, supported with bible verses and whole theologies). Now I see the bible, when read "in context," or "as a whole" (the suggestion I heard most), can suggest a diverse range of theologies. This idea of the Real Christian being sinless is not at all uncommon. 



#26 ElizabethB

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Posted 20 January 2014 - 03:32 PM

I am with Webster, from his 1828 dictionary:

1. The act of making holy. In an evangelical sense, the act of God's grace by which the affections of men are purified or alienated from sin and the world, and exalted to a supreme love to God.
God hath from the beginning chosen you to salvation, through sanctification of the Spirit and belief of the truth. 2Thess. 2. 1Peter 1.

2. The act of consecrating or of setting apart for a sacred purpose; consecration.

#27 Cafelattee

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Posted 20 January 2014 - 06:42 PM

Thanks everybody, you all are confirming what we already thought as a family.  I find it strange though that we have been attending a Nazarene church faithfully for 9 years and through two pastors and this was the first time we had heard of it.

 

I'm wondering the age of your pastor(s) and which seminaries.  The Nazarene pastor can attend Methodist, Weslyn  or a Nazarene seminary or be a Laymen trained minister which is a home study and still be ordained in the Nazarene church at least up until the 90's.  I'm not familiar with present running of the denomination. . 

 

 

  My dad became a Nazarene pastor at age 27 in the mid 70's.  His mentor pastor at that time was in his 40's and 3rd generation Nazarene.   The pastor mother was still living and was raised as a child  in the first generation of the founding church (I remember we called her granny  -she still kept the oldest ways of no hair cut and other requirements.  The Nazarene in the 70's didn't really dictate dress anymore but they had a list of what a real Christian should be doing.  I remember movies, aerobic, smokes, divorce were a strait to hell behavior.

 

I still go visit with my parents the Nazarene church that I grew up in and all that is left are folks over 60.   The kids of my generation quit church all together or change denominations

 

The Nazarene churches in our area are dying.

 

I wonder if you and your husband believe in "loosing salvations" (back sliding) which was a big deal in Nazarene sermons while I was growing up.  This was when you were sinning then you are no longer saved and going to hell until you repent of the sin.  

 

I left all the idea of no grace for daily slips up.  I finally came to my own understating between their believes and say the Southern Baptist that don't believe you can loose salvation.  I do believe that you can harden your heart and become an apostate but if this happens their his  no going back under Gods  grace.  I think this would be a rare person who hardens their hearts and turns their back on God but I see scripture supporting the theology.  I came to my reconciliation of my childhood with a great pastor who preaches at a Free Will Baptist and this was his view.  He was raised a southern Baptist and had to reconcile the 2 views.

  I just don't take it to mean that every little sin is lost of salvation which was the teaching of the Nazarene church in my youth.

 



#28 Joanne

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Posted 20 January 2014 - 06:59 PM

The process of the Holy Spirit at work in a believer to create - on its power and not the person's - the fruit of the spirit and Christ left character.

Former Presbyterian USA current inclusivist

#29 saraha

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Posted 20 January 2014 - 08:55 PM

When we originally  started attending this church, it was because we really liked the young (our age back then)  pastor and his wife.  He graduated from a Nazarene seminary.  We were not familiar with "holiness" teachings, but we liked the things that this preacher preached ie:  God loves us and wants us to go to heaven and love our neighbor while we are here.  No pulpit pounding, no talk about losing our salvation, etc.  As we talked to older people in the church over the years, we learned how much things have changed, like going to the movies, the way you dress, hair length etc and they all seemed pleased with the changes.  The other pastor that has been there was in his late 40s and we were his first church.  He also graduated from Nazarene seminary (there is one only a couple of hours from here).  I had never one time ever heard of losing your salvation or of being sanctified in the9 years we have been going there.  I was completely taken aback from this Sunday's teachings. 

 

My dh grew up in the Methodist church, I don't know how they feel about it, but I do know that he didn't agree with the pastor AT ALL.

He knew of this theology, but doesn't agree with it.  I thought that maybe this was a well known fact and that I had just missed it all these years.  In all of the religious things my dh and I have talked about over the years, sanctification had never been brought up.  It was never something he thought about talking about because he saw it as a natural outcome of being saved and didn't warrant a separate discussion, like never crossed his mind.

 

So I guess we will just carry on like we always have, since we had never heard this preached from the pulpit in all the years we have attended and the speaker was just a guest speaker.  We just explained to our kids that people interpret the scripture in different ways and it is their responsibility to research things they hear for themselves, by reading their bible and talking to people whose opinions they trust, like their dad and I.



#30 milovany

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Posted 20 January 2014 - 09:19 PM

This is one thing I NEVER agreed with the Nazarene church about and I knew many in the Nazarene church who would disagree that this is necessary for salvation.

 

I firmly believe that all we need for salvation is given at the point of salvation.  

 

Dawn

 

And many (most?) of the world's Christians believe the exact opposite.  It's this kind of thing that used to drive me nuts when I was trying to figure it all out on my own.  I'm not asking you defend your beliefs at all (nor am I saying mine are better than yours), just saying everyone can have an opinion if that's how we determine the things of faith. 

 

To answer the OP's question -- We believe sanctification is a process that starts with salvation (at baptism, which is for the remission of sins) and that continues throughout life.  "I was saved, I am being saved, I will be saved," and "I press on to take hold of that for which Jesus Christ took hold of me."
 



#31 Cafelattee

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Posted 21 January 2014 - 01:19 AM

When we originally  started attending this church, it was because we really liked the young (our age back then)  pastor and his wife.  He graduated from a Nazarene seminary.  We were not familiar with "holiness" teachings, but we liked the things that this preacher preached ie:  God loves us and wants us to go to heaven and love our neighbor while we are here.  No pulpit pounding, no talk about losing our salvation, etc.  As we talked to older people in the church over the years, we learned how much things have changed, like going to the movies, the way you dress, hair length etc and they all seemed pleased with the changes.  The other pastor that has been there was in his late 40s and we were his first church.  He also graduated from Nazarene seminary (there is one only a couple of hours from here).  I had never one time ever heard of losing your salvation or of being sanctified in the9 years we have been going there.  I was completely taken aback from this Sunday's teachings. 

 

My dh grew up in the Methodist church, I don't know how they feel about it, but I do know that he didn't agree with the pastor AT ALL.

He knew of this theology, but doesn't agree with it.  I thought that maybe this was a well known fact and that I had just missed it all these years.  In all of the religious things my dh and I have talked about over the years, sanctification had never been brought up.  It was never something he thought about talking about because he saw it as a natural outcome of being saved and didn't warrant a separate discussion, like never crossed his mind.

 

So I guess we will just carry on like we always have, since we had never heard this preached from the pulpit in all the years we have attended and the speaker was just a guest speaker.  We just explained to our kids that people interpret the scripture in different ways and it is their responsibility to research things they hear for themselves, by reading their bible and talking to people whose opinions they trust, like their dad and I.

 

I'm glad you have a good church you and your family enjoy.   I hope that I didn't come across as ill towards the Nazarene denomination.  My up bringing within the church was so legalistic that at age 43 I still will never take a "oath" or joining ceremony for any denomination.  Which means for the mainstream denomination  I can't really do any service because they are all about their "membership"  I stay nondenominational because with many of us that  grew up with the holiness movement different denominations and just don't want to be under that "yoke" again.  I tend to see a lot of us who were raised Nazarene, Pentecostal , Church of  Christ or Assembly of God which all had the list of sins rules back in the 70's and 80's  at least here in the south

 

anyway thanks for sharing your experience 
 



#32 Shamzanne

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Posted 21 January 2014 - 04:39 AM

I think to understand the Wesleyan view of sanctification you must understand the Wesleyan definition of sin. It is defined as a "willful transgression against a known law of God". In this theology, there are lots of names for things that many other people would call "sin". I come from a denomination that believes this and went to a Bible college that feels its mission is to spread this doctrine throughout the world. I find that many churches that believe wholeheartedly in this doctrine have lots of moralistic rules to follow. My experience with people who believe/preach sanctification tend to be that they have a difficult time dealing with the reality of sin and tend to live with their heads in the sand. (a huge generalization) The denomination I grew up in (ECNA) is moving farther from this doctrine. I tried to believe it and live it but reality didn't match up with the theology for me.

#33 mom@shiloh

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Posted 21 January 2014 - 07:27 AM

 I was glad that someone else pointed out that justification is an event -- being made right with God.  In my view, many of the holiness doctrines give people too much credit.  We can't take credit for justifying ourselves or sanctifying ourselves, only God does that.

 

Sanctification is the road after justification.  For most of us it is a mountainous road, full of switchbacks.  Just because our progress is slow, or we seem to be heading in the wrong direction at times, we don't lose justification.  That was a gift, and God's not going to take it back.  




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