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Suggestions for science after BFSU for young accelerated learner?


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#1 SeaConquest

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Posted 22 October 2013 - 04:17 PM

We are struggling with science for my science-loving PKer. We are doing BFSU1 right now and expect to move onto BFSU2 sometime in 2014. I'm wondering if anyone has any suggestions for science curricula after BFSU for the accelerated, younger elementary set? I had planned to do Ellen McHenry's programs, followed eventually by CPO Science, but would this be appropriate? Thanks for any suggestions.

 

Also, does anyone know where I can find a sequence for BFSU2 and 3? 



#2 serendipitous journey

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Posted 23 October 2013 - 08:15 PM

Have you joined the BFSU yahoo group(s)?  They would be a good source of ideas, and may have files with the S&S.  For a general science plan, I strongly suggest searching for lewelma's threads on science and mining some of her ideas, if her general approach suits. 

 

What are your goals?  Would you like to expand some of BFSU and move less quickly forward? 



#3 Evanthe

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Posted 24 October 2013 - 07:35 AM

What kind of science are you looking for?  Do you have a hands-on learner, etc?  Are you looking for a textbook and a curriculum?  Or do you want to just wing it?

 

My kids are science-obsessed, so I can tell you what we've been doing (might not be what you're looking for). 

 

My older two kids worked through all the Apologia science textbooks - zoology 1, 2, 3 and botany...and human anatomy/physiology.  We also did an astronomy unit study that we put together.  We read through the George's Secret Key to the Universe series (written by Stephen Hawking's daughter), listened to talks given by Stephen Hawking, used apps to study the constellations/objects in the sky, we went out every night and in the early morning and identified everything (even watched a meteor shower), read a number of astronomy books from the library (including that darn Horrible Science book about astronomy - Lol)...  We've also done other unit studies - one of birds that they had a great time doing.  I try to include alot of documentaries (like the Life of Birds series) and we plan to do the Backyard Bird project through Cornell Department of Ornithology.  Last spring, they also did a dissection lab - we bought it through Home Science Tools.  They watched a biology professor's class video on YouTube and followed along with their own dissections - listening to the teacher explain the different organs, etc.  I'm trying to remember, but I think they did a squid...a perch...a crayfish...and it seemed like there was a 4th animal, but I can't remember what it was. 

 

The younger set have been doing science from Janice Van Cleave's books.  Also, I have 2 volumes of KONOS and they work through science activities in those volumes.  They're currently doing a unit study on sound...so today, we're going to create sound waves with water and see if we can design an experiment showing sound going through objects.  The younger set also did a unit study on microbiology.  We read A World in a Drop of Water, collected pond samples, watched different videos on microscopic animals from YouTube and identified different things with our microscope.  We also bought jeweler's loupes and just explored things - like dragonfly eyes, etc.  They've also dissected owl pellets - where you can pull rodent skeletons from the owl pellets and try to identify them with the guide - also from Home Science Tools.  

 

My plans for the winter/spring semester: we're going to work through a number of the TOPS science booklets. 

 

I know CPO science looks good, but I showed it to my science-obsessed kids and I thought they were going to cry.  I mean, there was a mutiny in the school room.  My tweens were giving speeches about the horrors of such a dry way to learn science - it was like a scene from the French Revolution.   :tongue_smilie:

 

Not sure if any of that helped.  Good luck with your search!

 

Edited to add:  I forgot to add this earlier.  We've also really enjoyed Snap Circuits and the Thames & Kosmos science kits - specifically Physics Workshops and that Simple Machines kit.  We plan to try one of those bridge-building kits from Home Science Tools at some point.  In the science chapters in TWTM, SWB lists a number of science kits and their cost, where to buy them, etc.  



#4 SeaConquest

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Posted 24 October 2013 - 10:20 AM

Have you joined the BFSU yahoo group(s)?  They would be a good source of ideas, and may have files with the S&S.  For a general science plan, I strongly suggest searching for lewelma's threads on science and mining some of her ideas, if her general approach suits. 

 

What are your goals?  Would you like to expand some of BFSU and move less quickly forward? 

 

Forgive my ignorance, but how do you search for a member's posts by topic?

 

Not sure that I really have thought about specific goals beyond giving my son for a strong STEM background and preparing him for eventual AP and university-level coursework. But, that is so far down the road.



#5 SeaConquest

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Posted 24 October 2013 - 10:32 AM

What kind of science are you looking for?  Do you have a hands-on learner, etc?  Are you looking for a textbook and a curriculum?  Or do you want to just wing it?

 

My kids are science-obsessed, so I can tell you what we've been doing (might not be what you're looking for). 

 

My older two kids worked through all the Apologia science textbooks - zoology 1, 2, 3 and botany...and human anatomy/physiology.  We also did an astronomy unit study that we put together.  We read through the George's Secret Key to the Universe series (written by Stephen Hawking's daughter), listened to talks given by Stephen Hawking, used apps to study the constellations/objects in the sky, we went out every night and in the early morning and identified everything (even watched a meteor shower), read a number of astronomy books from the library (including that darn Horrible Science book about astronomy - Lol)...  We've also done other unit studies - one of birds that they had a great time doing.  I try to include alot of documentaries (like the Life of Birds series) and we plan to do the Backyard Bird project through Cornell Department of Ornithology.  Last spring, they also did a dissection lab - we bought it through Home Science Tools.  They watched a biology professor's class video on YouTube and followed along with their own dissections - listening to the teacher explain the different organs, etc.  I'm trying to remember, but I think they did a squid...a perch...a crayfish...and it seemed like there was a 4th animal, but I can't remember what it was. 

 

The younger set have been doing science from Janice Van Cleave's books.  Also, I have 2 volumes of KONOS and they work through science activities in those volumes.  They're currently doing a unit study on sound...so today, we're going to create sound waves with water and see if we can design an experiment showing sound going through objects.  The younger set also did a unit study on microbiology.  We read A World in a Drop of Water, collected pond samples, watched different videos on microscopic animals from YouTube and identified different things with our microscope.  We also bought jeweler's loupes and just explored things - like dragonfly eyes, etc.  They've also dissected owl pellets - where you can pull rodent skeletons from the owl pellets and try to identify them with the guide - also from Home Science Tools.  

 

My plans for the winter/spring semester: we're going to work through a number of the TOPS science booklets. 

 

I know CPO science looks good, but I showed it to my science-obsessed kids and I thought they were going to cry.  I mean, there was a mutiny in the school room.  My tweens were giving speeches about the horrors of such a dry way to learn science - it was like a scene from the French Revolution.   :tongue_smilie:

 

Not sure if any of that helped.  Good luck with your search!

 

Edited to add:  I forgot to add this earlier.  We've also really enjoyed Snap Circuits and the Thames & Kosmos science kits - specifically Physics Workshops and that Simple Machines kit.  We plan to try one of those bridge-building kits from Home Science Tools at some point.  In the science chapters in TWTM, SWB lists a number of science kits and their cost, where to buy them, etc.  

 

We are currently afterschooling, but may move to full-time homeschooling in the next year or so. I still don't know that I have it in me to go FT; I'm one of those parents that really needs a break. I'm mostly looking for rigorous, secular, interesting curricula. Something with a kit (or kits) of materials that I can buy while in the States is a bonus, as we travel frequently and finding things overseas can be difficult and time-consuming. I appreciate the advice and examples of what has been working for you.

 

Because my son is so young, I'm not sure that I really have a firm grasp of his learning style yet. I know, that I'm a visual person and my husband is more hands-on, so we kind of tag team instruction with my husband doing more of the experimentation/demonstration.

 

Re Apologia, are their science programs secular? That would be crucial for us. Re CPO, if you found it to be dry, what do you recommend instead?



#6 Evanthe

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Posted 24 October 2013 - 12:43 PM

We are currently afterschooling, but may move to full-time homeschooling in the next year or so. I still don't know that I have it in me to go FT; I'm one of those parents that really needs a break. I'm mostly looking for rigorous, secular, interesting curricula. Something with a kit (or kits) of materials that I can buy while in the States is a bonus, as we travel frequently and finding things overseas can be difficult and time-consuming. I appreciate the advice and examples of what has been working for you.

 

Because my son is so young, I'm not sure that I really have a firm grasp of his learning style yet. I know, that I'm a visual person and my husband is more hands-on, so we kind of tag team instruction with my husband doing more of the experimentation/demonstration.

 

Re Apologia, are their science programs secular? That would be crucial for us. Re CPO, if you found it to be dry, what do you recommend instead?

 

Hi, if you guys are after schooling and you're going to be traveling, then your needs will be very different from ours!  I reread your post, but this is for a preschooler, right?  It would be a long time before you would have to look into CPO.  At that point, there might be something better out there.  And, no, Apologia is not secular, so that wouldn't be a good one for you.

 

Do you have The Well-Trained Mind?  In Chapter 8, she gives a good description of how to teach science to grade school-aged kids.  However (and this might not work for you, because you're going to be traveling), she suggests a number of books and science kits.

 

Are you going to have access to a library while you're traveling?  You could put together science unit studies using a library.  Or internet?

 

I'm going to list some stuff that looks interesting.  Maybe that will give you some ideas.  And I'm not sure if these are all secular.

 

http://www.explorati...n.com/index.htm

 

http://www.elementalscience.com

 

http://www.galorepark.co.uk/index.html  (look under science - use age range)  These are little textbooks - we've used a couple of them.  They would be easy to travel with.

 

http://www.singapore...cience_s/66.htm  (singapore's science - not sure how these are - we've never used them.  They might travel well, though)

 

http://www.gravitaspublications.com  ( heard this isn't secular, but I've never seen any religious content.  We used the middle school physics one semester)

 

http://www.intellegounitstudies.com  (I think this uses the internet)

 

If I find something else, I'll post back.  Oh, have you seen TOPS science?  Although, if you're traveling, it might be hard to come up with the stuff for the projects...  Hmmm...



#7 serendipitous journey

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Posted 24 October 2013 - 09:05 PM

Well, you can do an "Advanced Search" by clicking on the white gear-looking-thingy just to the right of the green-background search icon near the search box at the top of these pages.  But usually I just look for threads/posts by lewelma and skim the titles.  Here are some ones that might interest:

 

Scientific Investigations with my 12 and 9 year old

Developing advanced reading skills is related to science study

 

... I can't find some others I had in mind, if I come across them I will add them. 

 

Apologia is not secular and not at all easily secularizable.  Ask me how I know ;)  The GEMS units by Lawrence Hall of Science are superb but not written for the HS group.

 

Honestly, I wouldn't worry about post-BFSU at this point.  Once you're closer to being through the materials you will have a much, much better idea of how your little one learns & of how (and how much!) you like to teach.  If you keep an eye on the science threads you'll build up a good knowledge base. 



#8 Alte Veste Academy

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Posted 24 October 2013 - 11:30 PM

I highly recommend inquiry science. My biggest inspiration was Nurturing Inquiry (http://www.amazon.co...f=cm_cr_pr_pb_i). The idea can be adapted up and down.

After years of using an inquiry approach, my oldest requested a textbook spine for the first time ever this year (5th grade). We chose CPO, but I am integrating all three books (similar to how BFSU ties threads together). I tweak and supplement them a great deal (loads of bios and non-fiction), but my kids do like the books. My oldest, however, has always been a lover of "fact books" and deals fine as long as the material itself is interesting to him. Also, at this age, I do like the idea of him learning to work with textbooks.

#9 Greenmama2

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Posted 25 October 2013 - 07:25 AM

We are struggling with science for my science-loving PKer. We are doing BFSU1 right now and expect to move onto BFSU2 sometime in 2014. I'm wondering if anyone has any suggestions for science curricula after BFSU for the accelerated, younger elementary set? I had planned to do Ellen McHenry's programs, followed eventually by CPO Science, but would this be appropriate? Thanks for any suggestions.

Also, does anyone know where I can find a sequence for BFSU2 and 3?

Hmm, BFSU really picks up the intensity in 2. I would not expect to move through it at the same pace. I love Ellen McHenry, but we have found her programs to fit well concurrently with BFSU 2, rather than following 3.

#10 jar7709

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Posted 25 October 2013 - 12:25 PM

Hmm, BFSU really picks up the intensity in 2. I would not expect to move through it at the same pace. I love Ellen McHenry, but we have found her programs to fit well concurrently with BFSU 2, rather than following 3.

 

I agree.  We just started volume 2, it is much more intense than 1.  We are having to adjust our pace; each lesson is much more dense than in 1.  I don't have it yet to compare, but I suspect BFSU 3 makes a similar jump, so if you want to go all the way through the BFSU sequence, you might have plenty of time to find what comes after, for you.  :)



#11 daijobu

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Posted 12 November 2013 - 10:32 PM

 

 

Also, does anyone know where I can find a sequence for BFSU2 and 3? 

 

We're working through BFSU3 right now.  The sequence is a bit more straightforward than BFSU1 and 2.  We did a few lessons in chemistry, then went straight through biology.  Then we'll finish chemistry and move on to physical science followed by earth science.  




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