Jump to content


What's with the ads?

Photo

Why do a state study? Is it important?


This topic has been archived. This means that you cannot reply to this topic.
55 replies to this topic

What's with the ads?

#1 Mom2TheTeam

Mom2TheTeam

    Hive Mind Queen Bee

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 884 posts

Posted 15 October 2013 - 10:44 AM

We are doing MFW Adv this year.  We are about to start the state study. We will do a quick overview of each state. I'm dreading it...really dreading it.  I'm just not seeing the point.  Can someone encourage me and tell me why a state study is a wonderful thing and important to a well-rounded education?  Hopefully, a better understanding of the importance will change my attitude. 

 

Thanks for any insight you have!

 

ETA - To clarify, I'm talking about a study of all 50 states, their flowers, flags, year they became a state and other similar details.  Not a study of our own state.  :)



#2 SilverMoon

SilverMoon

    Empress Bee

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 8719 posts

Posted 15 October 2013 - 10:52 AM

If it's necessary for a well-rounded education my kids are going to be square shaped. :p  We've never done one, yet my kids have picked up oodles of geography and facts about the states through the years. I can't see how it's hurt them any.



#3 Ellie

Ellie

    Beekeeping Professor

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 31663 posts

Posted 15 October 2013 - 11:42 AM

Of course it's important. How can you live somewhere and have no idea of its history? :confused1: 

 

Citizens should know their own history and geography. And on this forum, in particular, such a question always makes me go :blink:  Why ancient civilizations are more important than the place where one actually lives (and some day votes) is beyond me.



#4 Mom2TheTeam

Mom2TheTeam

    Hive Mind Queen Bee

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 884 posts

Posted 15 October 2013 - 12:08 PM

Of course it's important. How can you live somewhere and have no idea of its history? :confused1:

 

Citizens should know their own history and geography. And on this forum, in particular, such a question always makes me go :blink:  Why ancient civilizations are more important than the place where one actually lives (and some day votes) is beyond me.

 

 

I'm not saying our history is not important.  We are studying US history.  I enjoy US history a lot more than any other.  I don't enjoy studying each individual state and the little details about said state.  Yes, it is important to learn our countries geography and where each state is.  We are doing that.  Yes, it is probably important to learn the state capitals (even though I've never used that information having learned it in 4th grade) and we are planning to do that also.

 

I would love to hear your input as to why you think it is important to learn these individual state details.  That is what I'm looking for.

 

ETA - We are also planning to learn the history of our own individual state as we actually do live here. 

 

ETA again - I'm now realizing you may have thought I meant our individual state. I meant the small details of all 50 states. 



#5 54879525

54879525

    Beekeeping Professor

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 55102 posts

Posted 15 October 2013 - 12:12 PM

If you don't want to do a state study then don't do it.  I think Ellie thought you were talking about studying the state you live in.  You are talking about studying every state right?

 

It's easy to study the history of the state I reside in because it gets talked about in general US history a lot.  So I don't do anything separate.  And frankly I don't think it is absolutely necessary.  We happen to find it interesting so we do it for that reason, but I have no special warm and fuzzy personal reason for studying the state I live in.  I didn't grow up here.  Maybe I won't live here forever.  So it's not "my" state in my mind.

 

 



#6 54879525

54879525

    Beekeeping Professor

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 55102 posts

Posted 15 October 2013 - 12:15 PM

And interestingly my attitude about this might be indicative of the part of the country I come from.  I read somewhere once that some Americans feel a stronger sense of state while others feel a stronger sense of country.  I wasn't aware of that difference prior to reading about it!

 

 



#7 ajfries

ajfries

    Hive Mind Queen Bee

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 844 posts

Posted 15 October 2013 - 12:16 PM

I think its a waste of time to study other states' birds, flags, mottos, etc. I don't even know my own state's motto. And I don't care. I also thought having to study my state's history was a waste of time when I was in school; I doubt that will be high on my priority list, but it isn't until high school anyway.



#8 54879525

54879525

    Beekeeping Professor

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 55102 posts

Posted 15 October 2013 - 12:17 PM

I think its a waste of time to study other states' birds, flags, mottos, etc. I don't even know my own state's motto. And I don't care. I also thought having to study my state's history was a waste of time when I was in school; I doubt that will be high on my priority list, but it isn't until high school anyway.

 

I agree and I'd forget all those details in a few minutes.  LOL



#9 mathnerd

mathnerd

    Slacker Mom

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 2339 posts

Posted 15 October 2013 - 12:17 PM

Yeah. I hate it too. I personally don't think that knowing the State Flower, State Tree and the year the first settler landed in some state that I do not plan to live in or my child would ever live in (he already has plans on where he would live) makes any sense. For e.g. Kukui Tree is the state tree of Hawaii, Nene bird is it's state bird, Sanford Dole was the first president from there in 1894 etc. etc. just drives me nuts. All these facts are irrelevant to learning about the state of Hawaii. 

Ask me these same questions tomorrow about Hawaii, and I won't remember the answers (we are doing state study of the Western states this month ... and it is like swallowing medicine to me).



#10 ~Phoenix

~Phoenix

    Apprentice Bee Keeper

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 5668 posts

Posted 15 October 2013 - 12:20 PM

 Can someone encourage me

No. :tongue_smilie:

 

Sorry, you know my frustration that I've had this year. I will say, my kids are enjoying when we do "state study". But, we've only done 3 or 4 so far. The only thing that I think is kind of interesting is that we live in a place where there isn't a bunch of wildlife, so it's probably the only way we'd learn about specific birds and/or trees. At this point, the kids can name the states order, but I expect the excitement of this to wear off soon. I ended up pulling history readings from a bunch of sources (MFW, HOD, encyclopedia, etc.) and created a Sonlight-type schedule and am excited to pick that up after fall break next week. Lots of historical fiction, also. We'll continue the state study, but it won't be our main history, I really didn't expect that when I bought the program.
 



#11 Mom2TheTeam

Mom2TheTeam

    Hive Mind Queen Bee

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 884 posts

Posted 15 October 2013 - 12:22 PM

If you don't want to do a state study then don't do it.  I think Ellie thought you were talking about studying the state you live in.  You are talking about studying every state right?

 

It's easy to study the history of the state I reside in because it gets talked about in general US history a lot.  So I don't do anything separate.  And frankly I don't think it is absolutely necessary.  We happen to find it interesting so we do it for that reason, but I have no special warm and fuzzy personal reason for studying the state I live in.  I didn't grow up here.  Maybe I won't live here forever.  So it's not "my" state in my mind.

 

You are probably right.  I probably should have stated that better because I thought it might get mixed up.  My bad!

 

We live in a similar state.  You cannot study our country history without studying our state.  I've lived here my whole life, but I don't think our state history is as important as country.  My kids might and even probably will move.  I have 6 of them.  It's unlikely they will all stay in the state. 

 

I think its a waste of time to study other states' birds, flags, mottos, etc. I don't even know my own state's motto. And I don't care. I also thought having to study my state's history was a waste of time when I was in school; I doubt that will be high on my priority list, but it isn't until high school anyway.

 

Thanks!  I agree!!  That is exactly how I'm feeling.  You are giving me the courage to skip it.  LOL!  Our state history is always studied as part of U.S. history, but otherwise, we would do a short unit on it.  I wouldn't spend a ton of time on it.  People move around. 

 

And interestingly my attitude about this might be indicative of the part of the country I come from.  I read somewhere once that some Americans feel a stronger sense of state while others feel a stronger sense of country.  I wasn't aware of that difference prior to reading about it!

 

 

Agree.  I would rather instill pride in our country as a whole than in our state.



#12 54879525

54879525

    Beekeeping Professor

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 55102 posts

Posted 15 October 2013 - 12:25 PM

You are off the hook!  :laugh:



#13 MinivanMom

MinivanMom

    Hive Mind Royal Larvae

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 2761 posts

Posted 15 October 2013 - 12:25 PM

We have never done a state study.  We do study American history.  My kids learn lots about the history and culture of individual states in the context of US History.  They can't tell you the Oregon state bird or the Illinois state flower, but they could tell you all about the Oregon Trail and about Lincoln's ties to Illinois.  I think that is much more valuable. 

 

We do study the history of our individual state.  We don't spend a lot of time on it (I would never waste a whole year on it), but we do have several books about our state.  Even though we are not originally from this state, I think it would be weird if they didn't know a little about the history and culture of their current state.



#14 Mom2TheTeam

Mom2TheTeam

    Hive Mind Queen Bee

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 884 posts

Posted 15 October 2013 - 12:33 PM

No. :tongue_smilie:

 

Sorry, you know my frustration that I've had this year. I will say, my kids are enjoying when we do "state study". But, we've only done 3 or 4 so far. The only thing that I think is kind of interesting is that we live in a place where there isn't a bunch of wildlife, so it's probably the only way we'd learn about specific birds and/or trees. At this point, the kids can name the states order, but I expect the excitement of this to wear off soon. I ended up pulling history readings from a bunch of sources (MFW, HOD, encyclopedia, etc.) and created a Sonlight-type schedule and am excited to pick that up after fall break next week. Lots of historical fiction, also. We'll continue the state study, but it won't be our main history, I really didn't expect that when I bought the program.
 

 

I knew about it and still bought it.  I didn't really want to do it then either.  I don't know why I went ahead with it.  Loyalty.  But, I will willing admit we are moving on as soon as we can.  I need to wait a few months at the very least, but we are moving to HOD for 3rd.  If I can swing it, we will leave Adv and move to HOD after Christmas.  I can't decide if we want to hurry up and finish the history portion or just do it as written until we can ditch it.  I wish we loved it. 



#15 Mom2TheTeam

Mom2TheTeam

    Hive Mind Queen Bee

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 884 posts

Posted 15 October 2013 - 12:40 PM

You are off the hook!  :laugh:

 

:hurray: :hurray:

 

Thanks everyone!  I feel totally fine just skipping it if I want to....I want to! LOL.

 

(Sorry, I've been feeding the kids lunch while replying, so my replies are choppy.  Sorry about that.  :)



#16 cbollin

cbollin

    Hive Mind Queen Bee

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 3360 posts

Posted 15 October 2013 - 12:45 PM

You can leave out whatever you want.   Here are reasons that we didn't dread it.

 

1. coloring the bird or flower took almost no time per day, but has some nice benefit of looking for details.  It is ok to scale it back and do only the bird, or flower. But we had fun finding that there were places that some of the stuff was in common.

2. It is done as overview.  So you get a few facts here and there. 

3. you get to introduce them to the names of states and capitals without the pressure of memorize all of them right now.

4. The back side of the sheet -- read one or two facts in 2nd grade.... find the cool thing about that state, or the funny thing about it.  You never ever know where you might live and life changes!!!  and the USA is diverse.  So, it's good to see those little things in geography.

5. grab a book basket or two to see pictures of stuff.  if you skip the worksheet, life is ok.  But in 2nd grade, the amount of time to complete is not bad.  But at the same time, if it makes your child pull their hair out and throw fits... it's not worth it.  none of my children complained on it - not even the autistic one.  but she's weird like that. ;)

 

We did it for the geography value and seeing that not all states in the us look like our backyard.    In the most ideal and fun "ooh, we'd love this", would be to travel and vacation for a year to study the geography up close.   But that's not my real world.   So, I treated the 1 page worksheet the same way we see stuff at a rest stop on the interstate when going to a new state..... a moment to say "weclome to here"......  

 

that's how it worked in my house when we did the state study in year 4 and 5.  and that's how I liked it.    Hopefully you can ditch it soon and get something else.  ((hugs))  To me... .geography and history go together and that's why we did state study. 



#17 cbollin

cbollin

    Hive Mind Queen Bee

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 3360 posts

Posted 15 October 2013 - 12:58 PM

on this: "I would love to hear your input as to why you think it is important to learn these individual state details.  "

 

again...  if you don't want to do something.. don't do it... but  I personally thought it was more about the skill of training to see and notice details, make some observations about details.....and that a state study was the context of practicing those skills.   In terms of overall study in US history and geography... it helped my children to know thing are individiualized in various states and just become familiar that kind of information is available.  some of the stuff on the back side of the sheets was fun trivia, or silly laws on the books.  states were done in chronological admit to union order when it matched that timeframe in the history study.  So it was giving "this is when such and such became a state"... you have the big picture US history going on in the program and then a quick, zoom in on the state. 

 

sorry, my answers are choppy too...   same reason.  lunch. 

 

hope you find something that works for you.  



#18 lorisuewho

lorisuewho

    Luke 12:48b

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 1747 posts

Posted 15 October 2013 - 01:19 PM

This is a really interesting question!

 

I personally have a strong sense of state since my family has lived here since the the very early1700's.  It matters to us.  It is part of our family heritage.  I consider the state part of our blood.

Do I care about the other states' flowers or trees or mottos?  Not. at. all.  I think they are all inferior to our state. :blushing: heehee.

 

I think it is important for my children to understand US history, and how the various states played a role in that history.  I think it is important to be able to locate them on a map.  That's about it.



#19 54879525

54879525

    Beekeeping Professor

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 55102 posts

Posted 15 October 2013 - 01:44 PM

This is a really interesting question!

 

I personally have a strong sense of state since my family has lived here since the the very early1700's.  It matters to us.  It is part of our family heritage.  I consider the state part of our blood.

Do I care about the other states' flowers or trees or mottos?  Not. at. all.  I think they are all inferior to our state. :blushing: heehee.

 

I think it is important for my children to understand US history, and how the various states played a role in that history.  I think it is important to be able to locate them on a map.  That's about it.

 

:rofl:

 

And see I have such a non sense of state that this doesn't even bother me that you said this. 



#20 NCAmusings

NCAmusings

    Hive Mind Queen Bee

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 1656 posts

Posted 15 October 2013 - 01:46 PM

State Symbols USA



#21 bakpak

bakpak

    Birder Bee

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 489 posts

Posted 15 October 2013 - 03:08 PM

I would probably pick and choose states that we've visiting and study them beforehand. Or if you're studying something specific in history or science (e.g., deserts), I might throw in some specific state info sheets to give context. But going through them one at a time sounds dreadfully dull. And I'm a bird biologist who would enjoy coloring bird pics! :) 

 

Hmmm, my DD4 really enjoys flags, so I might be interested in doing a fun matching-game type of thing with some of the state flags too. But I dunno...I'd rather she know country flags instead of state flags. And of course the state flags from states we've lived in, but again, that's context. But worksheet after worksheet? Nah...



#22 bakpak

bakpak

    Birder Bee

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 489 posts

Posted 15 October 2013 - 03:13 PM

My DD would LOVE this set of real state flags to play with!  http://www.united-st...s-4x6-inch.html

 

 



#23 54879525

54879525

    Beekeeping Professor

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 55102 posts

Posted 15 October 2013 - 03:58 PM

http://www.united-st...x5ft-nylon.html

 

This would be a cool flag to have.

 

That's a neat site bakpak.

 

 



#24 simplemom

simplemom

    Hive Mind Level 5 Worker: Forager Bee

  • Validating
  • PipPip
  • 321 posts

Posted 15 October 2013 - 04:05 PM

Just a couple of weeks ago, while planning to cover US history more in depth next school year, I panicked because I realized that I won't have time to add in all the capitals, birds, flags, flowers, mottos, etc.... with the other things I have planned. We have a children's US atlas with those details that I plan to get out for my ds to look over in his personal reading time. It may interest him like other non-fiction books do, but no big deal if it doesn't. I think I might cover each region instead of each state, pointing out more specifics about states that stand out more historically. I am originally from Texas and suspect a prior poster is from there ;) . I was led to believe our state was superior when I was young. I haven't lived in Texas since I was a teenager, which was eons ago. While I was taught much about Texas state history through 8th grade, I know very little about the history of the state I've lived in the past 25+ years.

#25 PachiSusan

PachiSusan

    Hello From the Other Side

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 3265 posts

Posted 15 October 2013 - 04:08 PM

Of course you can skip it if you want to. What does your child think about it? Is s/he interested in doing it? 

 

We did a state study last year and we had a blast. We watched "How the States got their Shape" and the History Channel's special on each State. We read from DK"s State to State Atlas and learned them by the section of the state.  I asked friends to send her postcards from each state and she did a book. 

 

She said it was the best thing we had done all year. 

 

I think it's important for kids to know the country we live in. Each state has it's own unique character, and I think it's a good thing for them to see and study the diversity yet our connectedness.



#26 Cosmos

Cosmos

    Hive Mind Level 6 Worker: Scout Bee

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 2129 posts

Posted 15 October 2013 - 04:08 PM

Anyone who finds the state symbols boring and irrelevant might enjoy this article from Slate -- What the State Birds SHOULD Be.



#27 Cosmos

Cosmos

    Hive Mind Level 6 Worker: Scout Bee

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 2129 posts

Posted 15 October 2013 - 04:11 PM

Of course you can skip it if you want to. What does your child think about it? Is s/he interested in doing it? 

 

We did a state study last year and we had a blast. We watched "How the States got their Shape" and the History Channel's special on each State. We read from DK"s State to State Atlas and learned them by the section of the state.  I asked friends to send her postcards from each state and she did a book. 

 

She said it was the best thing we had done all year. 

 

I think it's important for kids to know the country we live in. Each state has it's own unique character, and I think it's a good thing for them to see and study the diversity yet our connectedness.

 

That sounds like a fun way to do a state-by-state study! You know that book, Children Around the World, that shows families in different countries and how they live, work, dress, etc? It would be cool to have something like that comparing the states or at least regions.

 

The focus on birds/flowers/mottoes that some books have seems boring to me.



#28 boscopup

boscopup

    Qualified Bee Keeper

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 11803 posts

Posted 15 October 2013 - 04:14 PM

Just let the kids play Stack the States. In no time, they'll know what each state looks like, where it's located, the capital, which states border it, which major cities are in it, some major landmarks, and even what the flags look like. I play it on my phone, and I'm so much better at recognizing states and capitals again (funny thing is that I was the *only* 100% on the state/capital test in my 10th grade class, yet I forget it all not long after that!).

 

We end up talking about most of the states as we study US History. We haven't done a specific study on our own state as of yet, but we've certainly pointed it out when our state was involved in the material we're learning. When we get to the Civil Rights movement this year, we'll get plenty of state history (we're in Alabama). In high school, I'll probably have my kids read an adult book on Alabama History (I found a good one at the library not long ago). That should cover everything they really need to know in much more detail than the measly state study we did in 4th grade in public school. ;)

 



#29 My3girls

My3girls

    Hive Mind Queen Bee

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 1193 posts

Posted 15 October 2013 - 04:57 PM

I plan to incorporate state study into American History and Geography. It won't get it's own special time slot but will be covered.

#30 texasmama

texasmama

    Beekeeping Professor

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 16820 posts

Posted 15 October 2013 - 05:35 PM

We've not done a state study; however, my kids have really enjoyed playing the Scrambled States of America game.  We did a summer geography unit and I got that game for the US portion of it.  They played it for many weeks afterwards just for fun.  :)



#31 Ellie

Ellie

    Beekeeping Professor

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 31663 posts

Posted 15 October 2013 - 05:35 PM

If you don't want to do a state study then don't do it.  I think Ellie thought you were talking about studying the state you live in.  You are talking about studying every state right?

 

It's easy to study the history of the state I reside in because it gets talked about in general US history a lot.  So I don't do anything separate.  And frankly I don't think it is absolutely necessary.  We happen to find it interesting so we do it for that reason, but I have no special warm and fuzzy personal reason for studying the state I live in.  I didn't grow up here.  Maybe I won't live here forever.  So it's not "my" state in my mind.

 

Yup, that's what I thought.

 

I do think, however, that as citizens of the U.S., we should be familiar with all 50 states and their capitals. How pathetic is it that an adult person would not be able to find Vermont on a map, or know which oceans are on our east and west borders, what countries are on our northern and southern borders, not know the difference between contiguous and continental states, and so on. But these are things which can be done in bits and pieces over time. I would just expect a young person who is going off to college or getting his first job or voting for the first time to know these things.



#32 M.A.

M.A.

    Hive Mind Level 2 Worker: Nurse Bee

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 1011 posts

Posted 15 October 2013 - 05:35 PM

A little bit of a different take.

I do think kids should have a good sense of the various regions of the US ...(so attention all you East of the Mississippi...California is not the only state on the West Coast ;) )

 

For instance growing up in Utah and the west  I could list the Southern states and stick them into a map but had no idea how diverse the various area and cultures in the South were...even as a high school student if you had said "South" my brain would have produced "peach pie", "slavery", and "alligators". That is a rather sad and shallow understanding of a huge area with a lot of historical, political and cultural significance to our country.

 

I know first hand the ridiculous "knowledge" that pops in peoples heads (and out of their mouths) when you say Utah.

 

And all my joking aside in other threads, The PNW is more than flannel, hairy legs, coffee and "herbs".

 

Letting our kids get by with only vague stereotypical snapshots of other areas of this huge country is limiting and can easily stray into accidental bigotry.

 

But I don't think that knowledge of our country can be taught with just a standard 'state study" of birds flowers mottos etc.. it can be fun for some in a trivia sense.

 

We try to focus on main regions, ie the PNW, the South...reading a lot of first person narratives and historical fiction. I am not sure short of extensive travel how much you can understand another region but I think it is important to find a more human/story based understanding than a fact based one. 

 

It is interesting even though people say regions/states are not important to me, they still have a lot of influence on you. You are living in the fishbowl so to speak so may not see it...I mean no one has an accent at home :) I had no "state pride " growing up but can still see how I was influenced by it.

 

I have lived in 4 distinct areas and of the 3 I am old enough to really remember the culture and politics and social interactions were very different. 

 

Short answer- I think it is important, but maybe checklists of flags and state mottos are not the way to go.

that being said... "Go Beavs!" :)



#33 gratitude

gratitude

    Hive Mind Level 2 Worker: Nurse Bee

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 286 posts

Posted 15 October 2013 - 07:13 PM

:hurray: :hurray:

 

Thanks everyone!  I feel totally fine just skipping it if I want to....I want to! LOL.

 

(Sorry, I've been feeding the kids lunch while replying, so my replies are choppy.  Sorry about that.  :)

 

I think it is better to skip that which we don't want to do and spend our time doing something else that we think is important for our children's education.  Not every mom is going to think spending 24 weeks on a state study, the way Marie puts the state study together in ADV, is important.  ;)

 

It was my least favorite part of ADV to be honest.  It is also the part I don't think any of us remember much from.

 

What I do think is important as far as a state study would go:

*Children to know about the history of their local area and country.  Local museums or land marks are a great way to do local history and teaches perhaps that when or if they do move they find out something about where they moved to!

 

*Children, who are USA living, to know the 50 states and where to find them on the map.  I would add all the countries on a globe too.  This is so easy though to teach.  Puzzles, wall maps, state CDs, world geography CDs, looking up on a map where someone is when they here about that place from a person, church, church missionary, book, Bible, etc....etc...etc....  

 

*Children to know that there are many different people in the USA, in each state, and in the world and that God created each one of us and loves us.

 

I didn't like the state study Heather because it focused on information, like state birds and state flags, rather than people or geography of the different areas.  Since our kids have one parent from the east & mostly west coast and one from the east coast we have tried to talk to them about the different land marks, geography, and people in different parts of the nation.    We like to tell them about what different parts of the country are like that we have seen at one point or another.  Our country is so diverse, and I felt like the state sheets removed all that wonderful diversity and replaced it with dry facts.  In other words, the state sheets weren't personal enough for me.  My son did color all of them, but....well...don't know what to say.  It got done.

 

If you want to skip it I don't think you would be missing out on the true meaning of ADV.  It is an opportunity though to teach basic state geography if you have not already.

 

The parts I did like in the last 24 weeks that I thought was worth doing:

*Names of Jesus study

*The rest of the history ADV covers and inventors (my kids loved the Morse Code)

*Time-line

*History note book

 

The state study (the way it was done) still makes me cringe; but we got through it.  Like another mom mentioned I didn't expect it when I bought the program.  I was expecting an entire year focused on American History, but that isn't really what ADV is.

 

Just remember you can throw out one thing and don't have to throw out the whole program.  And yes, you can definitely throw out the state study!  :D



#34 Meadowlark

Meadowlark

    Hive Mind Queen Bee

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 1418 posts

Posted 15 October 2013 - 09:31 PM

Okay, as someone who was considering adventures...now I'm scared! I did not know the state study was a whopping 24 weeks long! I agree with the op totally! I would not like studying facts of each state at ALL. So my next question is, how do you NOT do it? What do you add in or sub instead? How much is left of the program if you just omit the state study? Do you feel the program is worth doing if I omit it???

#35 sdobis

sdobis

    Hive Mind Level 6 Worker: Scout Bee

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 443 posts

Posted 15 October 2013 - 10:53 PM

We enjoyed doing a postcard swap. There are many different sites online to find out how to do this. We bought postcards with different Chicago sights. My son then wrote on each one facts about Illinois to send to someone in each of the other 49 states. When he received a postcard, he read about that state, looked it up on the map, and added it to a photo album of all the states. He would look through it all the time that year. I may do that with my daughter next year!

 

We also enjoy How the States Got Their Shapes, Stack the States, and State Bingo. There are too many fun ways to learn the states that aren't drudgery.



#36 Arcadia

Arcadia

    Hive Mind Royal Larvae

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 17168 posts

Posted 15 October 2013 - 11:46 PM

We collected a full set of the state quarters. My boys had lots of fun sorting. We have lots of extras of some states. My older's state study is part of his k12 spelling curriculum. He does not mind it and find it fun.

#37 cbollin

cbollin

    Hive Mind Queen Bee

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 3360 posts

Posted 16 October 2013 - 07:46 AM

Okay, as someone who was considering adventures...now I'm scared! I did not know the state study was a whopping 24 weeks long! I agree with the op totally! I would not like studying facts of each state at ALL. So my next question is, how do you NOT do it? What do you add in or sub instead? How much is left of the program if you just omit the state study? Do you feel the program is worth doing if I omit it???

 

I don't think you should be scared. I think you have a misunderstanding that might be nice to address.

 

I have done the state study in MFW twice now. I know others in the thread have done it and hated it while in ADV.  I've done it and my children enjoyed it when it was done over EX1850 and 1850MOD.  The first time, my oldest and middle were 5th and 2nd grade.(and then 6th and 3rd)  The second time, middle gal was . 7th and 8th... youngest was in 3rd/4th.

 

The amount of time per day on this is not that much.  Really, it's not.  They place a flag sticker on a worksheet. They learn some stuff that's important to know like state postal abbreviations. (have to learn that at some point).  You read a few sentences to them.   You are encouraged to have them color in the bird and flower and then put your worksheet on display for a bit.

 

So, to put it in perspective of 24 weeks in ADV:

The state study is done while you are still studying chronological US history.  So, you don't introduce a state until it becomes a state.  In other words, it takes 24 weeks to cover history from post Rev. War to about 1950.       but  it is not the case that the state study is the only thing in those weeks.  It is one thing in the history portion of the grid that day.  In some days, it might be the only thing on a Friday or rare Thursday or something. 

Also, to put the 24 consecutive weeks in perspective..... a hem....  There are some of those 24 consecutive weeks where you don't do any state sheet, or you do just one.  Example, on the week with Colorado, it's done while you are teaching about Transcontiental Railroad.  Colorado is the only state worksheet that week.  During brief Civil War study, no new states added.  no worksheet on that.   

You learn what was going on in history and that a place became a state is part of that history. They get a sheet to put stickers on, color a bit (and it doesn't have to be a drama filled time on that... my autistic child and I colored it together.   I asked her to tell me the color of the bird's wing and I colored it.  no drama time with the coloring needed)

 

 

Yes, it can become dull and boring and horrible if you let it. What part of school isn't like that?  But it's not a horrible chore to do either.    You grab some cool pictures of the state from books, or official tourist site.......  Then, you take the worksheet, and read a few things from the back of it to your children.  Not all of it!!!!!!!!

Then, remember the pics from book basket or tourist site?  set those around you while you color.   Talk about the fun things you could do in that state if you visited.  Or talk about things of interest:  oh, we're studying _______, that's where the ________ team plays, you know.      

 

If one turns it into "do your worksheet, do your worksheet, you can't eat until you finish this miserable, stupid mfw worksheet",  well, then, it's boring to do.  I'm not saying anyone on this thread has done that, I'm speaking in general terms how not to approach a worksheet.

 

Things that bother people with the way it is done in Adventures....

the first 13 states all happened at once, so the pace in those weeks is quick.  There are a few other weeks where several states joined so in a handful of those weeks you do a few sheets.  It is ONE PER DAY! keep that in mind.   ;)

 

The focus is not to shove every single fact down the throats of your children about every single state. The focus is NOT on state symbols or mottos either, although those are included.  You get to practice some fine motor skills, some basics of US geography.   Get to learn a cool thing... for example, it's fun to learn some of the silly laws that are on the books.  It's fun to try some of the regional dishes.   I made my husband eat grits.  He grew up in a part of the country where they didn't know what that was.  He also didn't know what collard greens were.  How can a person get to a PHD level and not know that?  wink......

 

Not everyone is going to like the same stuff.  Not everyone will like doing a state study like it is done in MFW, or from statehistory dot net, or anything.    But I hope my perspective of success with the mfw state study might help someone out there.

 

ps:oh, and something else my children enjoy:  Scrambled States of America.  fun to play. they've watched or listened to the book and think it's fun.   state quarters.   Some of this goes well beyond school time and for years to come.  They enjoy interstate travel to vacations and taking pictures of places. 



#38 Mom2TheTeam

Mom2TheTeam

    Hive Mind Queen Bee

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 884 posts

Posted 16 October 2013 - 08:53 AM

Okay, as someone who was considering adventures...now I'm scared! I did not know the state study was a whopping 24 weeks long! I agree with the op totally! I would not like studying facts of each state at ALL. So my next question is, how do you NOT do it? What do you add in or sub instead? How much is left of the program if you just omit the state study? Do you feel the program is worth doing if I omit it???

 

Amy, Crystal is exactly correct.  It isn't the whole program for 24wks.  It is a part of it along side the history portion. There is still history to learn even if we skip the state study.  However, I'm considering giving it a try.  As a pp mentioned, I haven't even introduced my son to it.  He may really enjoy it.  We'll see.  We will be there next week.  I'll probably see what my son thinks and go from there.  Through this discussion, I can see some benefit to this.  Only time will tell what we end up doing.... :patriot: 



#39 gratitude

gratitude

    Hive Mind Level 2 Worker: Nurse Bee

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 286 posts

Posted 16 October 2013 - 09:04 AM

Okay, as someone who was considering adventures...now I'm scared! I did not know the state study was a whopping 24 weeks long! I agree with the op totally! I would not like studying facts of each state at ALL. So my next question is, how do you NOT do it? What do you add in or sub instead? How much is left of the program if you just omit the state study? Do you feel the program is worth doing if I omit it???

 

I don't think you should be scared either.

 

I pointed out what I didn't like about the state study.  Reading the back of the sheets with the facts did go a bit in one ear and out the other...BUT...

 

I also pointed out what I liked in the program:

Jesus study, history note book, time-line, history note book, etc.

 

Around half of the history in ADV is covered, after the state study starts, during the last 24 weeks.  

 

I did think the history in ADV was light; but the goal of the program is to have a light gentle introduction to American History, and it does accomplish that goal.  The state study is a significant portion of the last 24 weeks, but so is the history covered during that time period.

 

I think the best element my oldest received from the program, who was 8 when we did it, was copying the scriptures every other week.  He still remembers doing it.  They were long for him at that age since his writing lags his reading abilities by miles and it made an impression.

 

Heather though was asking on this thread about whether to do the state study.  So this thread was about my least favorite part in ADV...not about the program as a whole.  As a whole I didn't like it as much as MFW1, but I do think my children learned some nice things from it and I am glad my oldest had a basic introduction to American History.



#40 cbollin

cbollin

    Hive Mind Queen Bee

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 3360 posts

Posted 16 October 2013 - 09:58 AM

if this would help anyone who is trying those sheets with 2nd/3rd grader (although I don't have boys so maybe this only works with girls? maybe not?)....

 

*don't read the whole back side of the sheet out loud.  read a sentence or two.  Tell them they can read the rest later IF they are interested.  Think of the back side as a "book basket" opportunity. again maybe my kids are just weird.... but I would "catch" them (oldest and middle that is) reading the back side later in the day. 

 

*display the pages on the fridge a week at a time.....  file in notebook when new week starts.....  maybe my kids are weird, but they enjoyed turning the pages of their notebook like that.

 

*they can copy a cool fact from the back to the front if you want to and feel like they need more writing in the curriculum instead of dealing with adding color to the picture.   They could write that in the outline of the state shape or something.  Or make a paragraph:  Here are 2 fun facts about State.. (don't do that for each state of course... it would be way too much writing, right?).   Honestly, I didnt' have my kids do that.  They didnt' mind the coloring.  but some children might like the option.

 

*when you introduce the state....  use your placemat map. and point it out.  go play on google maps or something with it.  I know we have fun seeing a state on map with satelite.  fun.

 

and agreeing with Carin on "least favorite part" doesn't have to mean the whole is icky.   maybe that's been the thing to me in how it worked out.  My least favorite part of my most recent summer vacation was reason we had to leave 2 days early.  If I only talked about that aspect (an unnamed tropical wave that created flooding in the unit, and the roof was leaking and ceiling collapsed in the bathtub, and we had to evacuate), well, you'd think I didn't have anything good that week.  seriously... how does an unnamed tropical wave, not even tropical depress strength cause that????  but it was my least favorite thing...... doesn't mean I didn't enjoy the first 5 days and I didn't let it completely cloud over the vacation...  .   maybe that's how it was for my family with something like state sheets in ADV.

 

 

anyway... hope some of those tips help someone who gets stuck in the worksheets.



#41 Tracy

Tracy

    Empress Bee

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 3755 posts

Posted 16 October 2013 - 10:57 AM

I think it useful to study the 50 states, but not by studying state flowers and birds and such in a vacuum out of context.  I really think that a state study belongs integrated with history.  Studying, for example, the 13 original states along with the Revolutionary War, the Louisiana Purchase with the French Revolution and the acquisition of the western states with the Mexican-American War makes a whole lot more sense to me.  Throw in the videos from How the States Got Their Shapes, and you have a great study of the 50 states.  



#42 Meadowlark

Meadowlark

    Hive Mind Queen Bee

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 1418 posts

Posted 16 October 2013 - 11:06 AM

I think it useful to study the 50 states, but not by studying state flowers and birds in such in a vacuum out of context. I really think that a state study belongs integrated with history. Studying, for example, the 13 original states along with the Revolutionary War, the Louisiana Purchase with the French Revolution and the acquisition of the western states with the Mexican-American War makes a whole lot more sense to me. Throw in the videos from How the States Got Their Shapes, and you have a great study of the 50 states.


I completely agree! So, what curriculum does that? ;-)

#43 Tracy

Tracy

    Empress Bee

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 3755 posts

Posted 16 October 2013 - 11:10 AM

I completely agree! So, what curriculum does that? ;-)

 

Tapestry of Grace

There are probably others, so maybe other people can chime in.  



#44 vonfirmath

vonfirmath

    Hive Mind Queen Bee

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 5220 posts

Posted 16 October 2013 - 11:56 AM

Just a couple of weeks ago, while planning to cover US history more in depth next school year, I panicked because I realized that I won't have time to add in all the capitals, birds, flags, flowers, mottos, etc.... with the other things I have planned. We have a children's US atlas with those details that I plan to get out for my ds to look over in his personal reading time. It may interest him like other non-fiction books do, but no big deal if it doesn't. I think I might cover each region instead of each state, pointing out more specifics about states that stand out more historically. I am originally from Texas and suspect a prior poster is from there ;) . I was led to believe our state was superior when I was young. I haven't lived in Texas since I was a teenager, which was eons ago. While I was taught much about Texas state history through 8th grade, I know very little about the history of the state I've lived in the past 25+ years.

 

BECAUSE the state history of Texas is so fascinating, when I moved to Washington I sought out state history resources. I never found anything good for the state, but I learned a LOT about Seattle and it really enriched the 14 years I lived there



#45 cbollin

cbollin

    Hive Mind Queen Bee

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 3360 posts

Posted 16 October 2013 - 12:02 PM

I completely agree! So, what curriculum does that? ;-)

 

MFW does it too.  in ADV, and then again in EX1850/1850, the state study is integrated into chronological history.  You don't do the states until Rev War, etc..... that's why if you look at the table of contents sample, you can see those topics are done the same week. california state.....  you're studying 1850 and the gold rush...  and it goes on like that. 

 

State symbols are not in a vacuum nor the focus, although they are included.  and in ADV...... the birds connect a bit with the science and nature study too.  

in ex1850... there is also a little bit of bird study in science as well.  



#46 vonfirmath

vonfirmath

    Hive Mind Queen Bee

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 5220 posts

Posted 16 October 2013 - 12:05 PM

I think it useful to study the 50 states, but not by studying state flowers and birds and such in a vacuum out of context.  I really think that a state study belongs integrated with history.  Studying, for example, the 13 original states along with the Revolutionary War, the Louisiana Purchase with the French Revolution and the acquisition of the western states with the Mexican-American War makes a whole lot more sense to me.  Throw in the videos from How the States Got Their Shapes, and you have a great study of the 50 states.  

 

From what cbollin, it sounds like this is what MFW does -- introduce the states with the accompanying history.



#47 ~Phoenix

~Phoenix

    Apprentice Bee Keeper

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 5668 posts

Posted 16 October 2013 - 12:06 PM

I completely agree! So, what curriculum does that? ;-)

 

Yes, I felt like Adventures does do this, it's just very light on history. Too light for us, unfortunately.
 



#48 Meadowlark

Meadowlark

    Hive Mind Queen Bee

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 1418 posts

Posted 16 October 2013 - 12:09 PM

Yes, I felt like Adventures does do this, it's just very light on history. Too light for us, unfortunately.


What ages did you do it with? Did you supplement or find something else entirely? If you had to do it over again, what would you do to make it feel like "enough"?

Kind of also curious...do you all recommend adventures for 2nd/3rd (with the 3rd grader being advanced), or 1st/2nd?

#49 Mom2TheTeam

Mom2TheTeam

    Hive Mind Queen Bee

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 884 posts

Posted 16 October 2013 - 12:20 PM

What ages did you do it with? Did you supplement or find something else entirely? If you had to do it over again, what would you do to make it feel like "enough"?

Kind of also curious...do you all recommend adventures for 2nd/3rd (with the 3rd grader being advanced), or 1st/2nd?

 

Adv does do this.  I think it is a little light on the history. However, I realized the reason I felt that way was because I, personally, was not using the book basket very well.  For us, to make the history enough, we needed to read more of the book basket books as read alouds.  Once we started doing that, it felt like enough to me.  But, for us, it did need the book basket and purposeful reading of those books.

 

One issue I was having was finding the book basket books.  I almost bought a ton of books on the book basket list to finish out the year.  What I ended up deciding was to use every book basket book my library did have and to use whatever else they had when they didn't have the exact ones.  My library has TONS of books on American history.  But, they are often not the ones mentioned.  It's been fine. 

 

Personally, I think it's more of a 2nd grade program and many 1st graders would probably do well with it also minus some of the copywork and written narrations...there isn't a ton of that anyway.  I don't think it's enough for 3rd.  That is just my opinion though.



#50 cbollin

cbollin

    Hive Mind Queen Bee

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 3360 posts

Posted 16 October 2013 - 12:25 PM

What ages did you do it with? Did you supplement or find something else entirely? If you had to do it over again, what would you do to make it feel like "enough"?

Kind of also curious...do you all recommend adventures for 2nd/3rd (with the 3rd grader being advanced), or 1st/2nd?

 

 

In my case, it was my middle and then youngest child who did the "equivalent of ADV" in 2nd and 3rd grades.  In the MFW scope and sequence, if you have an older child in EX1850, the younger students use the supplement in EX1850 for history... and that is the ADV lesson plans.. you just have one manual instead of two.  so.. I've done ADV with the "non oldest children". 

2nd and 1st in most cases.  Then the first grader gets to focus on fun stuff from adventures while working on 3 R's.  

 

in 3rd grade with advanced oldest child...  typically the stories you hear are that it's way too light.

 

easy ways to beef up history Adventures in my opinion?  Again, it's for 2nd graders. so... we're talking grammar stage learning... Make sure you are using book basket.  Take local field trips of historical interest. Watch some cool videos (some are listed in book basket).  It's 2nd grade. You'll still have all of that time for co-ops, and playing that you never ever get back when they are older!!!!!! and if one needs more writing you add that in simple ways.

 

at the same time...... I'm not one who likes to rush it anymore.  a young third grader who is ahead of grade level in reading, is still young age.     There is a lot in ADV that young advanced children should still be young enough to enjoy.....   or make them do all of the cutting.   make them read the craft instructions and do those while you supervise.  have them do the extra dictation and all of the lab reports.... 

 

happy wishes as you figure it out.