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Literature from 1850 to present


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#1 lewelma

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Posted 29 April 2013 - 07:53 PM

Would someone please point me to a good list of literature for a 9th grader to read from the period of 1850 to present. He is a good reader, currently reading Moby Dick, but is still young, so I still need to limit some adult themes. American, British, and World Literature are all good. He has already read all the younger kid books like Tom Sawyer, Call of the Wild, Count of Monte Cristo etc, so I am definitely looking for the Great Books. Also, it would be very handy if the list is linked to historical topics so I could place them within our history study. I am sure that a list like this exists, I just can't find it.

Thanks,

Ruth in NZ

#2 Kfamily

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Posted 29 April 2013 - 11:53 PM

Hmmm, does this help?


http://www.grtbooks....850&aa=AA&at=AA

#3 lewelma

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Posted 30 April 2013 - 01:51 AM

Thanks Kfamily. I will take a good look.

I am also looking for some lists from this board. I have seen them, but now with the poor search feature, I cannot find them.

#4 Sebastian (a lady)

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Posted 30 April 2013 - 05:47 AM

Do you have a copy of Well Trained Mind or Well Educated Mind? There are pretty good lists in the lit and history sections.

#5 tvaleri

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Posted 30 April 2013 - 06:56 AM

Have you considered looking at books used with TOG at www.bookshelfcentral.com?

Sonlight's booklist?

A Book in Time: http://www.abookinti...presentera.html

Smiles,
Teresa

#6 Sebastian (a lady)

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Posted 30 April 2013 - 07:09 AM

Would someone please point me to a good list of literature for a 9th grader to read from the period of 1850 to present. He is a good reader, currently reading Moby Dick, but is still young, so I still need to limit some adult themes. American, British, and World Literature are all good. He has already read all the younger kid books like Tom Sawyer, Call of the Wild, Count of Monte Cristo etc, so I am definitely looking for the Great Books. Also, it would be very handy if the list is linked to historical topics so I could place them within our history study. I am sure that a list like this exists, I just can't find it.

Thanks,

Ruth in NZ


Ruth,
I found a couple old threads that might get you started.
Modern Era must reads
Modern Literature list - help me pare it down

This is off the main WTM site:
Academic excellence 5-8 history and great books recommendations Even though it's listed as 5-8 I think there are some nice ideas for older readers if the works are new to them.

And this might be what you're looking for at a high school level.
Great Books A Defense and the (inevitable) list

How about throwing a couple tags on the thread. Maybe: Great books, modern era literature

#7 lewelma

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Posted 30 April 2013 - 08:37 PM

I guess what I am really looking for is 1 or 2 books on each of the historical topics and subtopics that we will be studying. I have posted my history reading list below (augmented with the library where required). My dh reads out loud to both children, so this list is set for mostly middle school range. I would like to extend my older ds who will be in either 8th or 9th grade next year (tbd), by using literature about these eras/issues. I have bolded the books I have already chosen for my older to read, but I would love about 10 more.

Open to suggestions,

Ruth in NZ



Life in the Victorian era / Industralization
Black Potatoes: The Story of the Great Irish Famine, 1845-1850 by Susan Campbell Bartoletti
Flesh and Blood so Cheap: The Triangle Fire and Its Legacy by Albert Marrin 10+
Shutting out the Sky: Life in the Tenements of New York (1880-1920) by Deborah Hopkinson 11+
Oliver Twist by Dickens
Around the World in 80 Days by Verne
Beyond the 100th Meridian by Wallace Stegner

Exploration
Books about Livingstone and Stanley from the library
Lost Photographs of Captain Scott
Amelia Lost: The Life and Disappearance of Amelia Earhart by Candace Fleming ChBIOEar
The Impossible Rescue: The True Story of an Amazing Arctic Adventure by Martin Sandler 10+
Reaching the Summit: Sir Edmund Hillary's Story by Alexa Johnston
Trapped: how the world rescues 33 miners from 2,000 feet below the Chilean Desert by Marc Aronson 10+

WW1
The War to End all Wars: World War I by Russell Freedman 12+

Between the Wars
Bootleg: Murder Moonshine, and the Lawless Years of Prohibition by Karen Blumenthal 12+
Six Days in October: The Stock Market Crash of 1929 by Karen Blumenthal 12+
Years of Dust: The Story of the Dust Bowl by Albert Marrin 9+
Growing Up by Russel Baker
Great Gatsby by Fitzgerald
Babbit by Sinclair Lewis

WW2
Dear Miss Breed: True Stories of the Japanese American Incarceration by Joanne Oppenheim 11+
Bomb: The Race to Build – and Steal-- the World's Most Dangerous Weapon by Steve Sheinkin 10+
Beyond Courage: The Untold Story of Jewish Resistance During the Holocaust, Doreen Rappaport ordered 10+
The Good Fight: How WW2 was Won by Stephen Ambros11+
Frontier of Dreams: The Weight of the World Wars
Diary of a Kiwi Soldier in WW2 by Cecil Coughlan
Secret Armies: Spies, Counterspies
Hitler Youth: Growing up in Hitler's Shadow 12+

Asia
Young Fu of Upper Yangtze by Elizabeth Lewis
The Cat Who Went to Heaven by Elizabeth Coatsworth
Where the Mountain Meets the Moon by Grace Lin 8+
Pyongyang: A Journey in North Korea by Guy Delisle Graphic Novel
Burma Chronicles by Guy Delisle GFloor-Graphic Novel
Shenzhen: A Travelogue from China by Guy Delisle Graphic Novel

Environmentalism
Black Gold: The Story of Oil in our lives by Albert Marin 12+
Silent Spring by Rachel Carson

Civil Rights
After Gandhi: One Hundred Years of Non-violent Resistance Perry O'Brien 11+
They Call themselves the KKK: The Birth of an American Terrorist Group by Susan Campbell Bartoletti 12+
Wheels of Change: How Women Rode the Bicycle to Freedom by Sue Macy 10+

Cold War
When the Wall Came Down: The Berlin Wall and the Fall of Soviet Communism by Schmemann 11+
Breaking Stalin's Nose by Eugene Yelchin 9+
Mao's Last Dancer by Chuxin Li

Technology
Steve Jobs: The Man Who Thought Different by Karen Blumenthal
Team Moon: How 400,000 People Landed Apollo 11 on the Moon by Thimmesh


#8 Deee

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Posted 01 May 2013 - 01:54 AM

North and South is fabulous for industrialisation and discussion about the various classes, including the beginnings of the labour movement. Gaskell corresponded with Dickens and their novels make for a nice compare and contrast.
D

#9 Candid

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Posted 01 May 2013 - 07:47 AM

Below is a list based on Tapestry of Grace's list, but I've changed things around a bit. They are all literature of the time period and mostly in order chronologically. The first book may overlap into a bit earlier, but it is a work of influence on writing after it.

I've also marked anything that might be too mature for him with a *: mostly those include violence but a few have other adult themes.

Great Expectations
Uncle Tom's Cabin
Poets: Arnold, Tennyson, Whitman, Dickinson, Hopkins

Crime and Punishment (Dostoevsky)*
A Doll's House (Ibsen)
Heart of Darkness (Conrad)
The Death of Ivan Ilyich (Tolstoy)*
An Ideal Husband
Poets: Yeats, Frost, Eliot

The Cherry Orchard (Chekhov)
All Quiet on the Western Front (Remarque)*
Animal Farm (Orwell)
Metamorphosis (Kafka)
Our Town

The Great Gatsby (Fitzgerald)
A Brave New World*
The Pearl (Steinbeck)*
The Glass Menagerie (Williams)
Poets: Cummings, Robinson, Williams
The Old Man and the Sea (Hemingway)
The Chosen (Potok)
Waiting for Godot
1984*
To Kill a Mockingbird

#10 Harriet Vane

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Posted 01 May 2013 - 09:44 AM

I have been teaching this era to a group of high schoolers this year. I have one freshman, four sophomores and five seniors. Here is what we did:

North and South, by Elizabeth Gaskell
Walden, by Henry David Thoreau (selections)
O Pioneers, by Willa Cather
Metamorphosis, by Franz Kafka
The Great Gatsby, by F. Scott Fitzgerald
All Quiet on the Western Front, by Erich Maria Remarque
short stories by Tolstoy and GK Chesterton
poetry by Walt Whitman and Emily Dickinson

Their Eyes Were Watching God, by Zora Neale Hurston
Animal Farm, by George Orwell
The Stranger, by Albert Camus
The Glass Menagerie, by Tennessee Williams
Cry, the Beloved Country, by Alan Paton
The Old Man and the Sea, by Earnest Hemingway
One Day in the Life of Ivan Denisovitch, by Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn
Perelandra, by C.S. Lewis
Romeo and Juliet, by William Shakespeare (not from the era, but I do a Shakespeare every year)
"Leaf, by Niggle," by J. R. R. Tolkein
Flannery O'Connor--short stories
poetry by Audre Lorde and Robert Frost

Recommended (see commentary below):

All Rivers Run to the Sea, by Elie Wiesel

Lord of the Flies, by William Golding
Fahrenheit 451, by Ray Bradbury


One word on C. S. Lewis--His Space Trilogy is one of the earlier works in the science fiction genre, and more specifically within that, the space fiction genre. I chose the second in the trilogy, Perelandra, to study because I consider it to be the finest in the trilogy both in terms of literary merit and theological/philosophical discussion. You can read the books of the trilogy out of order. However, I strongly recommended that my students go ahead and read the first of the trilogy, Out of the Silent Planet, over Christmas break. It has action and adventure and is not a difficult book. (It does wax philosophical in parts, but this is not overdone, and the story is quite compelling). Those that read it will have a better context for enjoying Perelandra.

There are three other books that I have chosen not to include in this class, but that deserve mention:

The Lord of the Flies and Fahrenheit 451 are both books that are considered American classics, and most high school students in this country do study them. While Lord of the Flies is readable, it is still a journey into darkness that I am reluctant to explore at length. Fahrenheit 451 is also a dark, unhappy, dystopian novel, plus it's NOT well written. I find its literary merit quite limited, and so prefer not to give precious class time over to it. That said, however, both ARE novels that students are likely to encounter in test settings (AP, etc.), and elements of both novels are compared to other literature and history in college classes. A working familiarity with both novels is a good idea. My recommendation for these two novels is to either read some sort of study notes summary (Cliff Notes or some such) OR to have your student read them over the summer, quickly, just for the purpose of cultural literacy. Personally, my daughter read a summary of Lord of the Flies, but was required to read the actual text of Fahrenheit 451.

The other book I want to comment on is All Rivers Run to the Sea, by Elie Wiesel. I have read a fair amount of Holocaust literature, but this book has really impressed me. The author writes with an absolutely lyrical, haunting quality. His perspective is that of a traditional, conservative Jew who experienced the Nazi camps as a young teen. He does not give detailed descriptions of the brutality, but rather conveys the emotions and the sense of those times with scattered, evocative images. The reader feels his horror as well as his joys without blow-by-blow descriptions. The book covers WW2 as well as the decades after the war, with a fair amount of focus on the creation of Israel. I highly recommend this book and will be requiring my daughter to read it at some point. I chose not to include it in the class because it is long and there is not time to do all the great literature we would like.

#11 lewelma

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Posted 01 May 2013 - 04:36 PM

Thanks for these lists! Do either of you read any more recent books, say 1950 to present. I am thinking about books of the literary quality of Toni Morrison, but something more appropriate for a 13 year old.

#12 Candid

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Posted 01 May 2013 - 05:31 PM

One word on C. S. Lewis--His Space Trilogy is one of the earlier works in the science fiction genre, and more specifically within that, the space fiction genre. I chose the second in the trilogy, Perelandra, to study because I consider it to be the finest in the trilogy both in terms of literary merit and theological/philosophical discussion. You can read the books of the trilogy out of order. However, I strongly recommended that my students go ahead and read the first of the trilogy, Out of the Silent Planet, over Christmas break. It has action and adventure and is not a difficult book. (It does wax philosophical in parts, but this is not overdone, and the story is quite compelling). Those that read it will have a better context for enjoying Perelandra.


Actually Out of the Silent Planet is not evenly remotely an early work of science fiction. It was published in 1938. You can read the history of science fiction here: http://en.wikipedia....science_fiction Some people find bits of science fiction dating back to Gilgamesh but I think that is stretching it. Early works in English include Frankenstein written in 1818, but I generally agree with the article that Wells and Verne mark the beginning of science fiction as a separate genre beginning around 1860. The real key event for science fiction multiplying hugely was the birth of pulp magazines int the 1920s. All the famous early writers wrote for the pulps.


There are three other books that I have chosen not to include in this class, but that deserve mention:

The Lord of the Flies and Fahrenheit 451 are both books that are considered American classics, and most high school students in this country do study them. While Lord of the Flies is readable, it is still a journey into darkness that I am reluctant to explore at length. Fahrenheit 451 is also a dark, unhappy, dystopian novel, plus it's NOT well written. I find its literary merit quite limited, and so prefer not to give precious class time over to it. That said, however, both ARE novels that students are likely to encounter in test settings (AP, etc.), and elements of both novels are compared to other literature and history in college classes. A working familiarity with both novels is a good idea. My recommendation for these two novels is to either read some sort of study notes summary (Cliff Notes or some such) OR to have your student read them over the summer, quickly, just for the purpose of cultural literacy. Personally, my daughter read a summary of Lord of the Flies, but was required to read the actual text of Fahrenheit 451.


Here's a place I agree with you whole heartedly, Fahrenheit 451 is in my opinion a dreadful novel. We do a disservice to Bradbury, who's Martian Chronicles are worth a read, in giving this novel to students first. The only thing good I can say about it is that is certainly an good example of pulp science fiction novels.

#13 lewelma

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Posted 01 May 2013 - 06:04 PM

We have done a very comprehensive unit this year on both classic Sci Fi and distopian lit including all listed above. It was a great year! However, this year I want to link literature to the history we are studying because he is more likely to read some of these classics if they have to be 'timed' with the other reading. Fewer excuses.

Thanks for the ideas

#14 Harriet Vane

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Posted 01 May 2013 - 07:46 PM

Actually Out of the Silent Planet is not evenly remotely an early work of science fiction. It was published in 1938. You can read the history of science fiction here: http://en.wikipedia....science_fiction Some people find bits of science fiction dating back to Gilgamesh but I think that is stretching it. Early works in English include Frankenstein written in 1818, but I generally agree with the article that Wells and Verne mark the beginning of science fiction as a separate genre beginning around 1860. The real key event for science fiction multiplying hugely was the birth of pulp magazines int the 1920s. All the famous early writers wrote for the pulps.




Here's a place I agree with you whole heartedly, Fahrenheit 451 is in my opinion a dreadful novel. We do a disservice to Bradbury, who's Martian Chronicles are worth a read, in giving this novel to students first. The only thing good I can say about it is that is certainly an good example of pulp science fiction novels.


The Wiki article you linked contains this statement:

Science fiction developed and boomed in the 20th century, as the deep penetration of science and inventions into society created an interest in literature that explored technology's influence on people and society. Today, science fiction has significant influence on world culture and thought.

As such, the Lewis Space Trilogy stands out to me as part of that development, that early boom in science fiction that helped shape the genre into what it is today. Some of the other writers in that movement included Wells, Asimov, Bradbury, Orwell, etc. To say that it is "not even remotely" a work of early science fiction is a strong statement that is not supported, even by the article you yourself linked.

#15 Candid

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Posted 02 May 2013 - 07:16 AM

The Wiki article you linked contains this statement:

Science fiction developed and boomed in the 20th century, as the deep penetration of science and inventions into society created an interest in literature that explored technology's influence on people and society. Today, science fiction has significant influence on world culture and thought.

As such, the Lewis Space Trilogy stands out to me as part of that development, that early boom in science fiction that helped shape the genre into what it is today. Some of the other writers in that movement included Wells, Asimov, Bradbury, Orwell, etc. To say that it is "not even remotely" a work of early science fiction is a strong statement that is not supported, even by the article you yourself linked.


I'm not sure the statement from Wikipedia indicates in any way that I can see that Lewis is an early writer of science fiction. Just that science fiction boomed in the 20th century.

Early can be taken two ways: first, my point was early as in first on a timeline. No way does Lewis meet that standard.

But your second statement above seems to be link Lewis to an early boom science fiction writing and as such influential in further science fiction writing. I'm afraid I don't agree with this either. I've read a lot of science fiction over the years, even took a college course in it. Lewis is not considered influential in any way in science fiction (he doesn't even come up). I can't think of any works after his that were influenced by him that are purely science fiction. It is possible there are works influenced by the space trilogy but I suspect they will also be Christian. There is no main stream "Christian science fiction" (as compared to other side areas found in and around science fiction such as fantasy) that I am aware of. Further even later religious works in science fiction such as the more recent The Sparrow owe nothing to Lewis.

Compare this to Asimov, Heinlein, Pohl, Bradbury, Dick, all writing in the 1930s. They have tremendous influence on science fiction after their time. You can pick up works from the 50s, 60s, 70s and on and find motifs from their work.

#16 Harriet Vane

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Posted 02 May 2013 - 08:51 AM

http://booksbycslewi...-voyage-as.html

Article about Lewis' Space Trilogy


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