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Common Core for the layman.


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#1 Mommyfaithe

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Posted 11 March 2013 - 06:30 AM

I really do not want this post to be a debate on the good/evil of Common Core....I just want to better understand it. I would also like to seE if we are coming anywhere near the CC requirements. Our state is Common Core, and as of now we have no intentions of moving. If I DO need to mainstream my kids back into public school, NEED to make sure they are where they need to be grade level wise.....so good, bad or ugly, I need to be on my toes with this one....

So, I would love a simple moms guide to Common Core along with resources we possibly can use in our homeschool. I see Pearson Learning seems to be the powerhouse behind this switch....along with Core Knowlege ( which is very CM/ classical...hmmmmm)

So please, share what you know...links, resources, homeschool curriculum etc. I am getting ready to align my curriculum with these core standards for my paper trail....and NO, it is NOT required...YET.

Thanks,
faithe

#2 Nscribe

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Posted 11 March 2013 - 06:46 AM

There is no replacement for reading the standards and the appendixes/exemplars:
http://www.corestand...g/the-standards

The appendixes and exemplars will give you book lists by year, samples.... The standards will state the basic goals.

#3 Plum Crazy

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Posted 11 March 2013 - 09:40 AM

What grades?

Math is easy, I would just get a CC-aligned math program and be done with that. Most of the biggies are aligning to CC, so it shouldn't be too much trouble.

For LA
Reading
It is more about active reading. Taking notes while you read, asking questions like what is the author trying to get say, are they trying to inform, entertain, or persuade me, what did I learn from this, what was the character's motivation, is it fact or opinion...
This site has all of the questions you would ask while reading critically.



Writing
Just get them writing opinion, persuasive, and expository sentences, paragraphs, essays depending on their age.


Here's a blog post that lists many of the CC-aligned curriculum.
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#4 Alessandra

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Posted 11 March 2013 - 10:54 AM

I really do not want this post to be a debate on the good/evil of Common Core....I just want to better understand it. I would also like to seE if we are coming anywhere near the CC requirements. Our state is Common Core, and as of now we have no intentions of moving. If I DO need to mainstream my kids back into public school, NEED to make sure they are where they need to be grade level wise.....so good, bad or ugly, I need to be on my toes with this one....

So, I would love a simple moms guide to Common Core along with resources we possibly can use in our homeschool. I see Pearson Learning seems to be the powerhouse behind this switch....along with Core Knowlege ( which is very CM/ classical...hmmmmm)

So please, share what you know...links, resources, homeschool curriculum etc. I am getting ready to align my curriculum with these core standards for my paper trail....and NO, it is NOT required...YET.

Thanks,
faithe


Just mom to mom -- no debate on CC, no politics, here is what I think. I find the CC extremely helpful. I do not go out and search for CC materials, if I have something that works, but I do check to make sure we hit all the bases. For example, I love Miquon Math, which was written way before CC was even imagined, so it it does not say'CC' on the cover. However, Miquon places an emphasis on conceptual understanding of mathematics -- as does CC. So they mesh well. Some standards for CC are not in Miquon at the suggested age. For example, Miquon does not use word problems early on and CC has simple ones in 1st grade. I chose to use some SM materials to do word problems, but I would also have felt OK delaying for a year or so. MM has better clock exercises that anything else I use, so I throw that into the mix, ass CC asks for time skills. I guess what I am trying to say is that you do not have abandon what is working for you, but adapt to incorporate additional skills, as needed. If I were using a program that was mainly drill, with very little conceptual understanding, I would have a more difficult decision -- I have not been down that road.

For LA, my take on CC is that is could have been written by WTMers. I need to add emoticons before people jump all over me for saying this, lol.
:smilielol5: :smilielol5: :smilielol5: :smilielol5:
What I am thinking of is that I see lots more grammar in CC -- when I had lhought grammar was dead except for hsers. I see lots more real books -- both classic fiction and also nonfiction than in previous standards (at least more than in my state). I happen to like grammar, I like reading a range of nonfiction, I like solid literature, so I am happy to see that in CC. I have seen people pick apart bits of CC here, and I don't want to argue every.single.standard. I am saying that overall, I like it. My opinion -- feel free to disagree, but not to bash me, please!!!

I keep copies of the math and LA CC on my iPad in Notability. I got the pdfs here:

http://www.corestand...A Standards.pdf
http://www.corestand...h Standards.pdf

You might also want to check your state's website for additional info that may be specific to your state.

As for Pearson, they are a publisher and, although they have a lot of CC info, they are not the 'powerhouse' behind it. CC was developed mainly by the National Governors' Association and by Achieve, a bipartisan, non-profit group. The Achieve website has a link (below) to some parent materials.

http://www.achieve.o...ing-common-core
http://pta.org/paren...ItemNumber=2583

Core Knowledge has always advocated some kind of coordination among schools. Their curriculum is mainly literature, history, science, etc -- areas not covered by CC. CC covers only LA and math. But I agree with you that the CK mindset is very compatible with CC -- and CK curriculum/books integrates with CC goals.

BTW, I am in a state that does not regulate hs curriculum at all, so I am looking at CC because it helps me to coordinate all the different programs I love and use.
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#5 Caroline

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Posted 11 March 2013 - 12:06 PM

You might also want to look at PARCC and SmarterBalance. Those are the two groups developing the assessments for the Common Core. Their websites give examples of tasks that students should be prepared to complete at different grade levels. I find them more helpful than the standards because they give a better indicator of the depth of knowledge students should have.

#6 Plum Crazy

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Posted 11 March 2013 - 12:23 PM

I would also look at your states CC implementation plan. You should find there some docs on how your state is implementing it. My states website included some lesson plans and they started a website for local teachers (anyone can sign up though) to share videos, lesson plans, and ideas about CC.
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#7 Alessandra

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Posted 11 March 2013 - 12:37 PM

I would also look at your states CC implementation plan. You should find there some docs on how your state is implementing it. My states website included some lesson plans and they started a website for local teachers (anyone can sign up though) to share videos, lesson plans, and ideas about CC.


That is a truly helpful website!

#8 Alessandra

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Posted 11 March 2013 - 12:42 PM

You might also want to look at PARCC and SmarterBalance. Those are the two groups developing the assessments for the Common Core. Their websites give examples of tasks that students should be prepared to complete at different grade levels. I find them more helpful than the standards because they give a better indicator of the depth of knowledge students should have.


I hear that PARCC will be tricky from a technological standpoint, as test are computer based. Schools will need adequate bandwidth and enough computers -- a number equal to half the size of the largest class is recommended. Plus students will need to be able to type.

#9 Susan in KY

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Posted 11 March 2013 - 02:35 PM

I really do not want this post to be a debate on the good/evil of Common Core....I just want to better understand it.


Well, I haven't looked much as language arts, but I have investigated math. The writers of the CCSS for elementary looked at Singapore math to develop them. The sample problems I have seen from PARCC and SBAC are both HEAVY on problem solving Singapore style. Students will need to be able to solve problems in different ways, justify answers and explain thinking. Any home school family who is using Singapore math, including Challenging Word Problems, as well as teaching according to the way the Singapore lessons are set up should be fine.

By teaching according to lesson structure, I mean a using gradual release into independent student work, using the lesson in the text book as a guide for the type of manipulative-rich, hands on activity your student should be doing to wrap his or her head around the concept. NY has some bundles of lessons. I will see if I can dig them up and link it after I find them.
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#10 Alessandra

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Posted 11 March 2013 - 03:09 PM

Well, I haven't looked much as language arts, but I have investigated math. The writers of the CCSS for elementary looked at Singapore math to develop them. The sample problems I have seen from PARCC and SBAC are both HEAVY on problem solving Singapore style. Students will need to be able to solve problems in different ways, justify answers and explain thinking. Any home school family who is using Singapore math, including Challenging Word Problems, as well as teaching according to the way the Singapore lessons are set up should be fine.

By teaching according to lesson structure, I mean a using gradual release into independent student work, using the lesson in the text book as a guide for the type of manipulative-rich, hands on activity your student should be doing to wrap his or her head around the concept. NY has some bundles of lessons. I will see if I can dig them up and link it after I find them.


Thank you!

Here is a link to the CC/Singapore comparison

http://www.achieve.o...CSSandSingapore

#11 Caroline

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Posted 11 March 2013 - 03:58 PM

That is what I have heard, too. Also, it is going to be a problem or math because students are going to have I be able to type mathematical symbols, rational functions, etc. which is not as intuitive as I would like to think it is.

And students will have to use the on-line calculators. If a student is used to a certain type if graphing calculator, it may be difficult to deal with the test's calculator.

I hear that PARCC will be tricky from a technological standpoint, as test are computer based. Schools will need adequate bandwidth and enough computers -- a number equal to half the size of the largest class is recommended. Plus students will need to be able to type.



#12 Arcadia

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Posted 11 March 2013 - 04:26 PM

I hear that PARCC will be tricky from a technological standpoint, as test are computer based. Schools will need adequate bandwidth and enough computers -- a number equal to half the size of the largest class is recommended. Plus students will need to be able to type.


PARCC technology guidelines are here http://www.parcconli...b2013Update.pdf. It is not that hard to meet given that the state's technology standards already have provisions for that many computers and bandwidth.
It is in California's Kindergarten technology standards for kindergarteners to learn typing. By the time the 3rd graders take the common core tests, they should have mastered typing.

#13 Caroline

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Posted 11 March 2013 - 04:44 PM

PARCC technology guidelines are here http://www.parcconli...b2013Update.pdf. It is not that hard to meet given that the state's technology standards already have provisions for that many computers and bandwidth.
It is in California's Kindergarten technology standards for kindergarteners to learn typing. By the time the 3rd graders take the common core tests, they should have mastered typing.


Schools in Georgia are simply not prepared for a testing situation like this. We do not have microphones and headphones for that many kids. We don't have working computers for that many kids. It will be an unfunded mandate, I am sure.

#14 Arcadia

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Posted 11 March 2013 - 05:52 PM

Schools in Georgia are simply not prepared for a testing situation like this. We do not have microphones and headphones for that many kids. We don't have working computers for that many kids. It will be an unfunded mandate, I am sure.


"What about schools and districts who don’t have adequate technology capacity by the 2014--‐2015 school year? Will there be a paper and pencil version of the assessment?

A paper and pencil version of the 2014--‐2015 assessment will be made available

for students who require certain accommodations that preclude online test--‐taking. The PARCC Governing Board is considering how to provide paper and pencil format assessments as an option for state that need it to address technology capacity gaps or other factors." (Source)

I guess for the 2014/2015 testing, the paper and pencil version would be around as a stop gap.


ETA:

California is also going to work out how to test for the 15% extra added to the state's common core.



#15 Mommyfaithe

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Posted 12 March 2013 - 05:41 AM

Just mom to mom -- no debate on CC, no politics, here is what I think. I find the CC extremely helpful. I do not go out and search for CC materials, if I have something that works, but I do check to make sure we hit all the bases. For example, I love Miquon Math, which was written way before CC was even imagined, so it it does not say'CC' on the cover. However, Miquon places an emphasis on conceptual understanding of mathematics -- as does CC. So they mesh well. Some standards for CC are not in Miquon at the suggested age. For example, Miquon does not use word problems early on and CC has simple ones in 1st grade. I chose to use some SM materials to do word problems, but I would also have felt OK delaying for a year or so. MM has better clock exercises that anything else I use, so I throw that into the mix, ass CC asks for time skills. I guess what I am trying to say is that you do not have abandon what is working for you, but adapt to incorporate additional skills, as needed. If I were using a program that was mainly drill, with very little conceptual understanding, I would have a more difficult decision -- I have not been down that road.

For LA, my take on CC is that is could have been written by WTMers. I need to add emoticons before people jump all over me for saying this, lol.
:smilielol5: :smilielol5: :smilielol5: :smilielol5:
What I am thinking of is that I see lots more grammar in CC -- when I had lhought grammar was dead except for hsers. I see lots more real books -- both classic fiction and also nonfiction than in previous standards (at least more than in my state). I happen to like grammar, I like reading a range of nonfiction, I like solid literature, so I am happy to see that in CC. I have seen people pick apart bits of CC here, and I don't want to argue every.single.standard. I am saying that overall, I like it. My opinion -- feel free to disagree, but not to bash me, please!!!

I keep copies of the math and LA CC on my iPad in Notability. I got the pdfs here:

http://www.corestand...A Standards.pdf
http://www.corestand...h Standards.pdf

You might also want to check your state's website for additional info that may be specific to your state.

As for Pearson, they are a publisher and, although they have a lot of CC info, they are not the 'powerhouse' behind it. CC was developed mainly by the National Governors' Association and by Achieve, a bipartisan, non-profit group. The Achieve website has a link (below) to some parent materials.

http://www.achieve.o...ing-common-core
http://pta.org/paren...ItemNumber=2583

Core Knowledge has always advocated some kind of coordination among schools. Their curriculum is mainly literature, history, science, etc -- areas not covered by CC. CC covers only LA and math. But I agree with you that the CK mindset is very compatible with CC -- and CK curriculum/books integrates with CC goals.

BTW, I am in a state that does not regulate hs curriculum at all, so I am looking at CC because it helps me to coordinate all the different programs I love and use.


I just typed a long reply and lost it grrrrrr. I just wanted to thank you for your insight and reply. This is exactly the reason I think I am in favor of CCSS. I am happy to see my CM/ classical bent has always met or exceeded these standards. Also, I always try to be sensitive to the fact that my children may need to be mainstreamed into the public school at any time due to my health issues. I am in a wonderful remission right now, but the next flare up ( praying it NEVER happens) could very easily end our homeschool days. My last one nearly killed me ....and I still have many residual effects....especially big memory gaps....so, having so many standard based curricula and goals which are clearly written out aids me to align my kids education to meet or exceed something concrete.

Politically, I am not happy about being mandated to follow standards across the board, especially since the assessment criteria/exam focus is ridiculous plus it impedes upon the freedom of each state etc., etc., ad nauseum......but it sure is nice to have a target list.
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#16 Mommyfaithe

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Posted 12 March 2013 - 06:08 AM

You might also want to look at PARCC and SmarterBalance. Those are the two groups developing the assessments for the Common Core. Their websites give examples of tasks that students should be prepared to complete at different grade levels. I find them more helpful than the standards because they give a better indicator of the depth of knowledge students should have.

Thanks...will add it to my open tabs....lol!
Let Teacher Training 2013 begin.....

#17 Mommyfaithe

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Posted 12 March 2013 - 08:12 AM

Well, I haven't looked much as language arts, but I have investigated math. The writers of the CCSS for elementary looked at Singapore math to develop them. The sample problems I have seen from PARCC and SBAC are both HEAVY on problem solving Singapore style. Students will need to be able to solve problems in different ways, justify answers and explain thinking. Any home school family who is using Singapore math, including Challenging Word Problems, as well as teaching according to the way the Singapore lessons are set up should be fine.

By teaching according to lesson structure, I mean a using gradual release into independent student work, using the lesson in the text book as a guide for the type of manipulative-rich, hands on activity your student should be doing to wrap his or her head around the concept. NY has some bundles of lessons. I will see if I can dig them up and link it after I find them.

. That would be awesome. I hesitate/cringe to change up math programs right now, however, I am quite adept at teaching math ala Singapore, but use CLE & A Beka as our work text. I am a math manipulative junkie....lol! And tend to talk my kids through math making them explain much better than.." the book says......so I ......" uh, no. Tell me what you did and why. If this is the standard, then I think I am set there. I do see a heck of a lot more fraction work earlier than we cover it, but not by much. Why are multiplying fractions covered so early (3rd grade) instead of end of 4th? Was this arbitrary or is there a real foundational reason?

Reading through these standards are very eye opening for a long term homeschool family.

Faithe

#18 Caroline

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Posted 12 March 2013 - 08:43 AM

. That would be awesome. I hesitate/cringe to change up math programs right now, however, I am quite adept at teaching math ala Singapore, but use CLE & A Beka as our work text. I am a math manipulative junkie....lol! And tend to talk my kids through math making them explain much better than.." the book says......so I ......" uh, no. Tell me what you did and why. If this is the standard, then I think I am set there. I do see a heck of a lot more fraction work earlier than we cover it, but not by much. Why are multiplying fractions covered so early (3rd grade) instead of end of 4th? Was this arbitrary or is there a real foundational reason?

Reading through these standards are very eye opening for a long term homeschool family.

Faithe


The bolded is exactly what the common core is about in all subjects, not just math. Explain your reasoning. Explain your thinking. Back up your opinions.

Note that the high school math standards are not broken up into courses. It is just a list that you need to complete by the time you finish high school. There is an extra year built in for kids who need an extra year to get through the information.

#19 Alessandra

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Posted 12 March 2013 - 09:44 AM

I just typed a long reply and lost it grrrrrr. I just wanted to thank you for your insight and reply. This is exactly the reason I think I am in favor of CCSS. I am happy to see my CM/ classical bent has always met or exceeded these standards. Also, I always try to be sensitive to the fact that my children may need to be mainstreamed into the public school at any time due to my health issues. I am in a wonderful remission right now, but the next flare up ( praying it NEVER happens) could very easily end our homeschool days. My last one nearly killed me ....and I still have many residual effects....especially big memory gaps....so, having so many standard based curricula and goals which are clearly written out aids me to align my kids education to meet or exceed something concrete.

Politically, I am not happy about being mandated to follow standards across the board, especially since the assessment criteria/exam focus is ridiculous plus it impedes upon the freedom of each state etc., etc., ad nauseum......but it sure is nice to have a target list.


I must have missed a lot of posts -- I did not realize that you had health issues. I hope you will be ok, with no flare-ups.

One thing that is missing here -- we'll, I don't think there is an answer yet -- is what kind of assessments hsers would take in a state that required some kind of assessment. I' d be interested in hearing how this plays out. I hope, for your sake, that you will not have worries there!

But for regular teaching, there would be so many acceptable paths to CC. It seems that every school curriculum I look at is aligned, even if it's just by adding a pacing guide. (Confession -- I was hoping to see Everyday Math discredited, but no such luck!) And living book curricula seem to be a great fit.

#20 Roadrunner

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Posted 12 March 2013 - 11:23 AM

I agree about math assessments looking SMish and English reading lists WTMish on CC. My fear is not the standards, but publishers are taking what they already have and slapping new CC labels, effectively changing little. I hope there will be closer scrutiny of materials.

I spent last weekend with my niece and her friends (all high schoolers). I can't imagine how any standard is going to make these kids read a book from cover to cover. They all boast about reading summaries online. I feel for teachers.



#21 Arcadia

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Posted 12 March 2013 - 11:55 AM

I always try to be sensitive to the fact that my children may need to be mainstreamed into the public school at any time due to my health issues. I am in a wonderful remission right now, but the next flare up ( praying it NEVER happens) could very easily end our homeschool days.

:grouphug: wishing you the best of health

One thing that is missing here -- we'll, I don't think there is an answer yet -- is what kind of assessments hsers would take in a state that required some kind of assessment. I' d be interested in hearing how this plays out.


I think it would be business as usual since ITBS, CAT and SAT-10 are not state standards aligned and still accepted. I wouldn't be surprise if SAT-10 or the others come out with a common core aligned version of their tests.

. My fear is not the standards, but publishers are taking what they already have and slapping new CC labels, effectively changing little.
.....
I spent last weekend with my niece and her friends (all high schoolers). I can't imagine how any standard is going to make these kids read a book from cover to cover. They all boast about reading summaries online. I feel for teachers.


There are slight movement of topics in math between california current standards and common core. So there would be some cut and paste involved and hopefully some improvements.

Every time we drop by Barnes and Nobles, we see high schoolers buying study guides for all subjects. Hopefully they are reading study guides to help them with their classroom learning and not as their "memorise and regurgitate" source.

#22 Mommyfaithe

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Posted 12 March 2013 - 02:19 PM

Thank you for the good wishes! I am feeling oh so much better now, and I am taking great pains to stay healthy and active which will hopefully keep me in check.

As far as assessment, I am curious how the schools are handling these on a weekly/ monthly/ semester basis. How are they gauging their own progress? I know the teachers in my area are all in an uproar, and rightfully so, because they feel their assessments are based on how their kids score on end of year tests. They are expected to gain much ground that was below standards for their grades...making up lost time under loads of pressure. There was supposed to be a one year grace period, but the teachers I know are really feeling pressure....and are NOT happy. My one friend's biggest complaint is she is so busy aligning standards, and making sure her kids are test ready that she can not teach.

As for my own homeschool, I am constantly assessing....and we do have to pass standardized tests...but so far they have been a no brainer for my kiddoes.





#23 Alessandra

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Posted 12 March 2013 - 02:33 PM

As for my own homeschool, I am constantly assessing....and we do have to pass standardized tests...but so far they have been a no brainer for my kiddoes.


:hurray:

#24 Arcadia

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Posted 12 March 2013 - 03:00 PM

As far as assessment, I am curious how the schools are handling these on a weekly/ monthly/ semester basis. How are they gauging their own progress?


I only know how my local school district does the assessments. K-5 goes by a trimester system. Two to three weeks before the end of trimester, the teacher spends a week in the classroom doing testing for the student's report card. This is done one by one so each child has a testing session with the class teacher. For 6-8, the school goes by a semester system. So report cards go back twice a year and the subject teachers would have a week to do the testing as well one to one.
The schools districts around mine does it similarly. Doing the assessments weekly or monthly would be a time drain.

Out of curiosity, don't your local schools have report cards for the students? My school district's student report card is aligned with state standards.
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#25 Mommyfaithe

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Posted 13 March 2013 - 05:01 AM

I only know how my local school district does the assessments. K-5 goes by a trimester system. Two to three weeks before the end of trimester, the teacher spends a week in the classroom doing testing for the student's report card. This is done one by one so each child has a testing session with the class teacher. For 6-8, the school goes by a semester system. So report cards go back twice a year and the subject teachers would have a week to do the testing as well one to one.
The schools districts around mine does it similarly. Doing the assessments weekly or monthly would be a time drain.

Out of curiosity, don't your local schools have report cards for the students? My school district's student report card is aligned with state standards.


This is SOOOO Charlotte Maon!!! LOL! Do they even realize the circle they have come??? LOL! Oh my goodness...evaluating each child separately? Having kids do narration/dictation? Composing their own opinion from a text they have read? I am giggling all the back to my Ambleside online folder.....LOL!!!!! Oh, And as far as quarterly, semester, trimester assessment....CM was the QUEEN!!!! I wish she was on that board of teachers!


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