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Is homeschooling really that controversial?


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#1 Dialectica

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Posted 09 March 2013 - 12:37 PM

Today, I was introduced to a friend's friend at a get together. Homeschooling came up immediately, after he asked where my kids went to school. The guy was very quick to make it clear that he didn't agree with homeschooling: "Who on earth gives you the authority to educate your kids yourself when you don't even have a teaching degree?"

When I began to formulate a reply, he shut me down and told me that "children should obviously be in school". Another person joined in the conversation to say that he also thought homeschooling was wrong. Parents may help their kids with homework, but should not have the chance to decide which curriculum their kids use. I talked to my friend about the conversation afterwards, and he said that he believed most people would oppose the decision to homeschool, though they may not voice their opinions.

I was shocked, quite frankly. I didn't realize homeschooling was seen as that controversial. Sure, some people would disagree, but shouldn't they at least think about the issue in some depth before expressing any views beyond perhaps "I wouldn't want to homeschool my own children"?

#2 AK_Mom4

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Posted 09 March 2013 - 12:43 PM

What a Rude Dude!

I haven't run into that level of rudeness from anyone about homeschooling. Of course, we run into other homeschoolers everywhere we go and it's a pretty accepted choice where I live, so that may be part of it. Far more people are curious about how it actually works especially as my kids are older.

But I have seen disabled children with service dogs run into the same type of negative reaction in a restaurant, so maybe you just ran into a whacko who got his cage rattled by something he percieves as somehow threatening him?

#3 C_l_e_0..Q_c

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Posted 09 March 2013 - 12:46 PM

it's very controversial where I live. Very rarely will I get someone who thinks homeschooling is a viable option.
The people who end up knowing our kids eventually agree that we're doing a good job, but otherwise, the knee-JERK reaction is just that. Jerks.

#4 JBJones

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Posted 09 March 2013 - 12:48 PM

What an A$$!! Really??! Before I would have been able to stop myself, (and wouldn't have wanted to anyway) I would have told him, "Here is a news flash for you.....I'm the person on earth that gives me the authority and it is none of your business.....since they are not your children."
I did want to add that we live where there are virtually no other homeschoolers, but we never encounter anyone like that. That dude was totally out of line.

#5 amsunshine

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Posted 09 March 2013 - 12:49 PM

Today, I was introduced to a friend's friend at a get together. Homeschooling came up immediately, after he asked where my kids went to school. The guy was very quick to make it clear that he didn't agree with homeschooling: "Who on earth gives you the authority to educate your kids yourself when you don't even have a teaching degree?"

When I began to formulate a reply, he shut me down and told me that "children should obviously be in school". Another person joined in the conversation to say that he also thought homeschooling was wrong. Parents may help their kids with homework, but should not have the chance to decide which curriculum their kids use. I talked to my friend about the conversation afterwards, and he said that he believed most people would oppose the decision to homeschool, though they may not voice their opinions.

I was shocked, quite frankly. I didn't realize homeschooling was seen as that controversial. Sure, some people would disagree, but shouldn't they at least think about the issue in some depth before expressing any views beyond perhaps "I wouldn't want to homeschool my own children"?


Wow!

Yes -- people should actually think before they open their mouths and insert both feet. However, it doesn't seem to happen often.

Perhaps this person was a teacher or had close relatives who are teachers and that was the source of his animosity?

#6 dbmamaz

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Posted 09 March 2013 - 12:51 PM

It seems that the better educated people are, sometimes the more attached they are to the value of (drawing a blank on the word i really want) 'organized' education. The believe that schools are the only place one can be well educated, they believe that teacher training is about how to teach, and they often dont trust people who are coloring outside the lines. Others see homeschooling as primarily a way that extreme conservatives brain-wash their kids and prevent them from getting a good education.

its esp painful for me as a liberal democrat - democrats and liberals are often the most vocal anti-homeschooling voices . . . they believe in the value of school . . . absolutely.

#7 Mouseketeer67

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Posted 09 March 2013 - 01:02 PM

EDITED BY MODERATOR

Edited by Moderator, 10 March 2013 - 01:56 PM.
That was rude.


#8 Dialectica

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Posted 09 March 2013 - 01:05 PM

It seems that the better educated people are, sometimes the more attached they are to the value of (drawing a blank on the word i really want) 'organized' education. The believe that schools are the only place one can be well educated, they believe that teacher training is about how to teach, and they often dont trust people who are coloring outside the lines. Others see homeschooling as primarily a way that extreme conservatives brain-wash their kids and prevent them from getting a good education.

its esp painful for me as a liberal democrat - democrats and liberals are often the most vocal anti-homeschooling voices . . . they believe in the value of school . . . absolutely.


Blind faith in the value of the institution of public school — but based on what? Did these people ever actually analyze what happens in public schools, both academically and socially? Did they stop to think what may go on inside a homeschool before condemning a family's decision to educate at home? Do they ever think about what teachers learn before they end up in front of a classroom?

I can understand disagreeing with homeschooling in some situations, or believing that the relevant government agencies need to check up on homeschooling families (though I wouldn't necessarily agree with that). But opposing somebody's decision so strongly without ever really giving a second thought to where your opinions come from is just... extremely short-sighted, no?

Interestingly enough, another comment this (indeed, supposedly well-educated) person made was that even private schools do not have the right to teach less than public schools. Assumption, much? My kid works more than three grade levels ahead of her counterparts within the public school system.

I'll add that we're in Europe. The guy also asked where on earth (he really liked those words apparently!) homeschooling is actually legal. Ehm... just about everywhere in the world?

#9 Dialectica

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Posted 09 March 2013 - 01:06 PM

double post

#10 Dialectica

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Posted 09 March 2013 - 01:12 PM

What a Rude Dude!

I haven't run into that level of rudeness from anyone about homeschooling. Of course, we run into other homeschoolers everywhere we go and it's a pretty accepted choice where I live, so that may be part of it. Far more people are curious about how it actually works especially as my kids are older.

But I have seen disabled children with service dogs run into the same type of negative reaction in a restaurant, so maybe you just ran into a whacko who got his cage rattled by something he percieves as somehow threatening him?


He is not a wacko overall. I'd heard many interesting stories about this guy before actually meeting him. I don't care what opinions real wackos have about homeschooling, it is precisely because this person is apparently usually sane that I was shocked.

#11 C_l_e_0..Q_c

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Posted 09 March 2013 - 01:13 PM

well, there is value in school! Let's not forget that. But the fact that there's value in school does not mean that there's no value outside of school either. And even that the value outside of school might be greater than the one in school for certain families, certain kids.
But there *is* value in school...

#12 swellmomma

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Posted 09 March 2013 - 01:16 PM

Wow that a rude person.

I had a conversation yesterday about homeschooling but in the sense of "I can't help my kid with his homework without a fight, there is no way I could teach them" I pointed out that the dynamic is different homeschooling. BUt she seemed actually open to listening, not like that guy.

I have had 2 of the rudest conversations about homeschooling started by guys I did date/would potentially date. 1 was with a guy I was dating, before I had my youngest, that came out to homeschool conference with me (he stayed at the hotel, I went to the conference) and he tore into me about how wrong it was much like that guy you are describing. The most recent was a guy I was getting to know with the prospect of dating and he was so close minded and ignorant about it that I told him no deal basically. It didn't help that I found out in that conversation that he has a 16 yr old dd that refuses to see him anymore and he has no clue what is going on with her education etc. He was just a very black & white person and is going to find himself lonely for a long time if he doesn't change.

I find though the biggest thing I have come across is the negative or opposed thoughts towards homeschooling until they learn that my kids have extra needs, that ds14 was suicidal at 7 in ps etc. Then they make that point of saying things like that we are the exception etc because it is working and the kids aren't normal etc. If they were your average kid they would still be opposed to homeschooling but with a kid with extra needs (whether gifted or LD) then they see it as viable. That is something I see all the time, especially living in a small town where the community itself revolves around the ps.

In your case OP I don't think it is that homeschooling is controversial as much as simply being that the guy is a douchecanoe.

#13 Dialectica

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Posted 09 March 2013 - 01:16 PM

well, there is value in school! Let's not forget that. But the fact that there's value in school does not mean that there's no value outside of school either. And even that the value outside of school might be greater than the one in school for certain families, certain kids.
But there *is* value in school...


Yes, of course there is value in school! Anyone who would deny that would be just as extreme as a person who says that all children should be enrolled in public school. Having options is so important, isn't it?

#14 C_l_e_0..Q_c

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Posted 09 March 2013 - 01:17 PM

Dialectica I noticed you mentioned you're European. Homeschooling is a big big "bad thing" in most European countries. It's something only wacko Americans - those who love their guns, their Monsanto grain, and lack of nationalized health care - could ever do or think of doing.
Note that I am neither European or American ;-)

#15 Dialectica

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Posted 09 March 2013 - 01:21 PM

Dialectica I noticed you mentioned you're European. Homeschooling is a big big "bad thing" in most European countries. It's something only wacko Americans - those who love their guns, their Monsanto grain, and lack of nationalized health care - could ever do or think of doing.
Note that I am neither European or American ;-)


Ah, Americans and their civil liberties. Terrible thing! :)

#16 Carol in Cal.

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Posted 09 March 2013 - 01:24 PM

Sure. it is very controversial. Most of the people I know IRL can't stand it. They are politer than that, but they think it's really weird. I don't care. We tend to forget just how countercultural we are. It goes with the territory.

#17 G5052

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Posted 09 March 2013 - 01:31 PM

I was shocked, quite frankly. I didn't realize homeschooling was seen as that controversial. Sure, some people would disagree, but shouldn't they at least think about the issue in some depth before expressing any views beyond perhaps "I wouldn't want to homeschool my own children"?


You'll always run into this. I live in an area with many homeschoolers, and I still sometimes cross people this way without even intending to. They think that we're some kind of extremist movement. Or they think that it is OK for little kids, but not for teens. I'm a professional educator, and they still think that I'm unable to educate my own. Oh well...

#18 Pawz4me

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Posted 09 March 2013 - 01:41 PM

Probably depends a lot on your location. From what I've read of the way homeschooling is viewed in much of Europe, your encounter doesn't surprise me. Here in my area of the American south, homeschooling is so common that it rarely causes any comment.

#19 Dialectica

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Posted 09 March 2013 - 01:45 PM

You'll always run into this. I live in an area with many homeschoolers, and I still sometimes cross people this way without even intending to. They think that we're some kind of extremist movement. Or they think that it is OK for little kids, but not for teens. I'm a professional educator, and they still think that I'm unable to educate my own. Oh well...


I have come across people who don't agree with homeschooling before, obviously. I don't mind, when 1) the person opposing homeschooling is obviously generally stupid, 2) the person can come up with at least semi-rational reasons why they disagree, or 3) the person voices their disagreement in a polite manner.

Surely, any person can see that not all children thrive within the same type of educational environment? Surely, any person can understand that sometimes homeschooling is the best option, even if they see that choice as less than ideal? Surely, any person can grasp the idea that "socialization" can be achieved in more ways than one?

I guess I am simply naive :).

#20 Dialectica

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Posted 09 March 2013 - 01:51 PM

Wow that a rude person.

I had a conversation yesterday about homeschooling but in the sense of "I can't help my kid with his homework without a fight, there is no way I could teach them" I pointed out that the dynamic is different homeschooling. BUt she seemed actually open to listening, not like that guy.

I have had 2 of the rudest conversations about homeschooling started by guys I did date/would potentially date. 1 was with a guy I was dating, before I had my youngest, that came out to homeschool conference with me (he stayed at the hotel, I went to the conference) and he tore into me about how wrong it was much like that guy you are describing. The most recent was a guy I was getting to know with the prospect of dating and he was so close minded and ignorant about it that I told him no deal basically. It didn't help that I found out in that conversation that he has a 16 yr old dd that refuses to see him anymore and he has no clue what is going on with her education etc. He was just a very black & white person and is going to find himself lonely for a long time if he doesn't change.

I find though the biggest thing I have come across is the negative or opposed thoughts towards homeschooling until they learn that my kids have extra needs, that ds14 was suicidal at 7 in ps etc. Then they make that point of saying things like that we are the exception etc because it is working and the kids aren't normal etc. If they were your average kid they would still be opposed to homeschooling but with a kid with extra needs (whether gifted or LD) then they see it as viable. That is something I see all the time, especially living in a small town where the community itself revolves around the ps.

In your case OP I don't think it is that homeschooling is controversial as much as simply being that the guy is a douchecanoe.


Interesting that you mention this. I was introduced to the guy who made the rude comments by the person I am currently dating. He was the one who "gently" said that most people would view homeschooling as unacceptable though they would not be as rude about expressing their opinions. I suppose that means he disagrees, too. Oh well.

#21 Dialectica

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Posted 09 March 2013 - 01:51 PM

Wow that a rude person.

I had a conversation yesterday about homeschooling but in the sense of "I can't help my kid with his homework without a fight, there is no way I could teach them" I pointed out that the dynamic is different homeschooling. BUt she seemed actually open to listening, not like that guy.

I have had 2 of the rudest conversations about homeschooling started by guys I did date/would potentially date. 1 was with a guy I was dating, before I had my youngest, that came out to homeschool conference with me (he stayed at the hotel, I went to the conference) and he tore into me about how wrong it was much like that guy you are describing. The most recent was a guy I was getting to know with the prospect of dating and he was so close minded and ignorant about it that I told him no deal basically. It didn't help that I found out in that conversation that he has a 16 yr old dd that refuses to see him anymore and he has no clue what is going on with her education etc. He was just a very black & white person and is going to find himself lonely for a long time if he doesn't change.

I find though the biggest thing I have come across is the negative or opposed thoughts towards homeschooling until they learn that my kids have extra needs, that ds14 was suicidal at 7 in ps etc. Then they make that point of saying things like that we are the exception etc because it is working and the kids aren't normal etc. If they were your average kid they would still be opposed to homeschooling but with a kid with extra needs (whether gifted or LD) then they see it as viable. That is something I see all the time, especially living in a small town where the community itself revolves around the ps.

In your case OP I don't think it is that homeschooling is controversial as much as simply being that the guy is a douchecanoe.


Interesting that you mention this. I was introduced to the guy who made the rude comments by the person I am currently dating. He was the one who "gently" said that most people would view homeschooling as unacceptable though they would not be as rude about expressing their opinions. I suppose that means he disagrees, too. Oh well.

#22 Nscribe

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Posted 09 March 2013 - 02:02 PM

Eric Holder (Attorney General of the United States) recently reminded us the official US Gov't position is that homeschooling is a privelege, not a right.

#23 treestarfae

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Posted 09 March 2013 - 02:03 PM

I would have said this to the ignorant man- "I wasn't asking you for permission" while laughing and pointing at him.

#24 dbmamaz

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Posted 09 March 2013 - 02:06 PM

btw, when my daughter was basically having a nervous breakdown in high school, i worked with her school so that she could take most of her credits at a local community college, some independent study, some night school, and only 2 more classes at her high school. It was a custom program because they didnt have anything for what she wanted to study.

the local friends were just baffled. Her high school friends could NOT BELIEVE she didnt want to be in high school any more. One of her friends mom's confronted me about taking her out of school and I said "She just really wasnt liking it" "Wasnt liking it?" the tone implied that thats not a reason to leave. and we werent homeschooling her - she still got a diploma. and got to study graphic art. A lot of people were just totally unsupportive of not following 'the rules'. Conformity is big around here.

#25 albeto

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Posted 09 March 2013 - 02:22 PM

I was shocked, quite frankly. I didn't realize homeschooling was seen as that controversial. Sure, some people would disagree, but shouldn't they at least think about the issue in some depth before expressing any views beyond perhaps "I wouldn't want to homeschool my own children"?


Yes, controversial. Public schools may not be perfect, but there exist standards that can ideally be met, standards developed through critical analysis of the facts and based on logical reasoning. I say ideally, because clearly that doesn't always happen, but at least there is the ability to make corrections once information has been revealed. In one's home, there are no such standards, and precious little information or accountability. The ability of the parent to sequester the child from a variety of knowledge essentially oppresses them from available information. This affects society as a whole, not just the individual child. That some communities encourage this is problematic to those of us who desire an educated society rather than an intentionally ignorant one.

Example of problems of home education:
http://youtu.be/DH_wPUVlJ38

I don't think the answer is mandatory public education, and I don't think the answer is necessarily more oversight into home education. As one who watches my children learn without the benefit of a formal curriculum, I appreciate the freedom to personalize my children's learning experiences. I do think one answer is to encourage home educators to understand and appreciate the value of education.

#26 Walking-Iris

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Posted 09 March 2013 - 02:25 PM

I've had rude encounters. One is an owner of a local vineyard who seems to want to tear into me about everything when I'm anywhere near him. Gun control, homeschooling, even recycling---for whatever reason if this guy senses I'm for it, he has an argument against it. But he makes good wine.

Another is a local 3rd grade teacher who takes it as a personal insult that I am homeschooling. She's gone as far as to rudely ask me how I" felt about teachers working so hard in school and having school debt and then people like me have the nerve to insinuate they can't do their job." Which btw is something I would never insinuate. I try to avoid this person.

But honestly most people are either pleasantly interested or just mind their own business and could care less.

Although I do live in a small town that worships the local schools and the local Catholic private school. There's an overwhelming amount of school pride here, so a homeschooler is suspect.

#27 Crimson Wife

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Posted 09 March 2013 - 02:29 PM

There is definitely a lot of "credentialism" and sometimes the idea of teaching one's own children without first having gotten a credential is seen as akin to performing brain surgery without having gone to med school and earned board certified as a neurosurgeon. I remind people that just like one does not have to be a culinary school graduate to cook food for one's family nor a certified auto mechanic to perform routine maintenance on one's car, one does not need to be a credentialed teacher to HS elementary school material. Sure, I probably will outsource the teaching of certain subjects at the high school level, but that would be like someone who does DIY routine auto maintenance deciding to outsource a complicated repair to a mechanic.

#28 Crimson Wife

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Posted 09 March 2013 - 02:35 PM

Can you share which values you see are being brainwashed, and explain how this brainwashing works? Generally, to be so brainwashed, one must be fairly sequestered from all other viewpoints, and exposed to extreme emotions. Public education cannot offer that, as each child is exposed to the ideas and beliefs of each one of their teachers as well as each individual they know and interact with.


"Brainwashing" is a bit of an exaggeration, but there is a definite bias in most PS materials towards a secular-progressive POV that often is anti-Christian (and particularly anti-Catholic). I really like the K12 Human Odyssey series in general but there are certain chapters in the volume covering the medieval times that I cannot use because they are too one-sided and worse, contain a misrepresentation of Catholic doctrine.

#29 Clarkd

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Posted 09 March 2013 - 02:35 PM

I don't think one group is the problem/more likely to be against homeschooling. I am not anti public school. I am liberal, previously a teacher, currently I prepare future teachers. I hs our 4 children. Many of us have had negative/questioning comments about our choice to hs (although no one has been as rude to mas the what happened to the op). There is a lot of doubt about hs families. It is less criticism than decades ago, acceptance is growing. I think it is important to stay away from categorizing one group or another as more likely to be critical.

#30 Crimson Wife

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Posted 09 March 2013 - 02:40 PM

The ability of the parent to sequester the child from a variety of knowledge essentially oppresses them from available information.


Do you object to vegan parents raising their children as vegans and denying them the opportunity to eat animal products? Or are you okay with them raising their children in alignment with their family's values because when those children are adults they will have plenty of opportunity to decide for themselves whether or not to remain vegan?

Edited by Moderator, 10 March 2013 - 07:00 PM.
Removed the name-calling.


#31 Bucolic

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Posted 09 March 2013 - 02:44 PM

Yeah, that is what I hope is an exceptionally rude stranger. Where I live, I feel like whenever people find out we homeschool, they say, "Oh, my sister-in-law/neighbor/cousin/whoever homeschools! She loves it!" If nothing else, people at least keep their negative opinions (if they have them) to themselves.

Oh, and I live in a super liberal area with incredible public schools...and people still react to homeschooling that way. ;)

#32 albeto

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Posted 09 March 2013 - 02:45 PM

Do you object to vegan parents raising their children as vegans and denying them the opportunity to eat animal products? Or are you okay with them raising their children in alignment with their family's values because when those children are adults they will have plenty of opportunity to decide for themselves whether or not to remain vegan?


My objection is the systematic suppression of information, regardless of what belief system it may support. I am not aware of this trend among vegan parents, therefore I can't speak about it. However, this trend among some religious homeschoolers is not only clearly visible, it is publicly encouraged and celebrated.

=

Edited by Moderator, 10 March 2013 - 07:00 PM.
Removed quote from deleted post


#33 amsunshine

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Posted 09 March 2013 - 02:49 PM

I would have said this to the ignorant man- "I wasn't asking you for permission" while laughing and pointing at him.


LOL! I'd be really curious as to whose permission the guy thought I might need?

#34 Alte Veste Academy

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Posted 09 March 2013 - 02:51 PM

When I read about the OP's encounter, I thought it was the rudest thing I had heard in a very long time. Shockingly rude and low class.

Then I kept reading the thread....

#35 SarahW

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Posted 09 March 2013 - 02:52 PM

Eric Holder (Attorney General of the United States) recently reminded us the official US Gov't position is that homeschooling is a privelege, not a right.


Umm, yeah, I don't really see the word "homeschool" in any of the amendments of the Constitution, soo... :confused:

It has good legal precedent, and that counts. A lot. But I don't think it really falls under inalienable rights.

#36 OhElizabeth

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Posted 09 March 2013 - 03:05 PM

When I talk with people and they're confused by the whole thing, I quickly point out I'm complying with the law and what that involves. Most people I meet have NO CLUE what the homeschool law is. That's pretty much what I would have done in your situation, just say you're complying with the law and move on.

#37 zoobie

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Posted 09 March 2013 - 03:24 PM

Do you object to vegan parents raising their children as vegans and denying them the opportunity to eat animal products? Or are you okay with them raising their children in alignment with their family's values because when those children are adults they will have plenty of opportunity to decide for themselves whether or not to remain vegan?


With what exactly are you equating meat and animal product consumption?

Edited by Moderator, 10 March 2013 - 07:01 PM.
Removed quote from deleted post


#38 54879525

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Posted 09 March 2013 - 03:34 PM

It's not all that controversial around here. I've gotten weird questions about it, but I honestly felt like it was just curiosity not disgust. Some people even say stuff like, "Wow, that's great!" or "I wish I were homeschooled!"

I will say though that it is in Germany (my in-laws are in Germany). But at least nobody thus far has been so rude as to go on and on about it.

#39 TXMary2

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Posted 09 March 2013 - 04:03 PM

I have encountered several rude people over the years. My favorite was a public school teacher whose son was on my son's baseball team. I always bring something to read with me because I don't get a lot of free time to read. Sometimes it is a hs magazine, or TWTM or sometimes I bring a catalog and mark things I find interesting. One day she asked me, "Are you always reading?" and she sounded disgusted by it, she wasn't acting nicely. That conversation led to me being a homeschooler. She then said she could never do what I do.....because obviously what I do is harder than managing a classroom of 25 kids that aren't hers. (SMH) Then at a later time she cornered me and said, "Can I ask you a question? Why ON EARTH would you want to homeschool?" I bit my tongue, but I wanted to be snarky and tell her it was because of people like her teaching in the schools. I was nice though and kept my answer brief and to the point. Some people just aren't able to self-monitor so they end up coming across like a**es.

#40 redsquirrel

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Posted 09 March 2013 - 04:13 PM

My personal belief is that librals believe in the value of brain washing kids in public school!


Well then how do you explain the large presence of social and political liberals on this board, and in the homeschool world in general? In my local area, homeschooling is quite popular, hardly worth mentioning, and the vast majority are social and political liberals. That is a rather broad brush you are holding. I could just as easily state that religious conservatives believe in the value of brain washing kids in church. The argument doesn't hold.

However, back on the original question, I often get the feeling that there is an unspoken quiet disapproval by many in my non-homeschooling social circle. I do try to address it when people tell me I am a 'good' homeschooler or make claims like it's ok for someone like me to homeschool but not for 'those other people' etc. I think it is an assumption that many homeschoolers are not doing a very good job at teaching math and science. That is always the first thing that I get asked about.

I am also pretty sure there is some pity for my kids. I think many people think I am depriving them having something major in common with their peers. They are correct in that it is difficult to be in the minority in many situations. I know that sometimes my older son does feel left out when his peers discuss things in school that they did together.

Now, when faced with the kind of rudeness that the OP encountered, I find a big smile and a "Well, then it's a good thing I don't give a sh&^ about what you think" works very well. But, I am a New Yorker and sometimes we roll like that.

#41 Mommy22alyns

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Posted 09 March 2013 - 04:16 PM

I haven't run across this IRL, but yes, I have come across some serious venom online about homeschooling. It gets pretty nasty and I just have to back away. But IRL everyone has been nice or even admiring about it. Either the girls speak for themselves or I have serious "don't mess with me" face. :coolgleamA:

#42 treestarfae

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Posted 09 March 2013 - 04:25 PM

We simply don't NEED public school. Then there's the people who do. End of story. Simple as that. For the people who are curious or confrontational. "We don't need public schooling, thanks for the offer"

#43 Dialectica

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Posted 09 March 2013 - 04:30 PM

Do you object to vegan parents raising their children as vegans and denying them the opportunity to eat animal products? Or are you okay with them raising their children in alignment with their family's values because when those children are adults they will have plenty of opportunity to decide for themselves whether or not to remain vegan?


We are lacto-ovo vegetarians. Believe it or not, I have had plenty of people tell me that it "is not fair" that I am not willing to prepare meat in my home, for my children, despite the fact that I have been vegetarian all my life (my mom was vegetarian) and have no idea to cook meat. I am quite aware you were trying to make a point here, but be careful :), some people think anything outside of the "mainstream" is wrong.

(Do note we live in a very conservative country, so we may get many more of these comments than people in other countries.)

Edited by Moderator, 10 March 2013 - 07:01 PM.
Removed quote from deleted post


#44 msjones

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Posted 09 March 2013 - 04:35 PM

Yes, controversial. Public schools may not be perfect, but there exist standards that can ideally be met, standards developed through critical analysis of the facts and based on logical reasoning. I say ideally, because clearly that doesn't always happen, but at least there is the ability to make corrections once information has been revealed. In one's home, there are no such standards, and precious little information or accountability. The ability of the parent to sequester the child from a variety of knowledge essentially oppresses them from available information. This affects society as a whole, not just the individual child. That some communities encourage this is problematic to those of us who desire an educated society rather than an intentionally ignorant one.

Example of problems of home education:
http://youtu.be/DH_wPUVlJ38

I don't think the answer is mandatory public education, and I don't think the answer is necessarily more oversight into home education. As one who watches my children learn without the benefit of a formal curriculum, I appreciate the freedom to personalize my children's learning experiences. I do think one answer is to encourage home educators to understand and appreciate the value of education.



I imagine that I have very little in common with the woman in this video.

But, I think she has the right to teach her children her beliefs. I agree that her children are sequestered from a variety of viewpoints, but I think it's her right to decide what to teach -- even if many of us find it concerning.

#45 briansmama

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Posted 09 March 2013 - 04:36 PM

I feel sorry for the guy- he sounds ignorant.

#46 Word Nerd

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Posted 09 March 2013 - 04:42 PM

I think it depends on your location. Most people didn't think anything of the fact that we homeschooled where we used to live, as it's fairly common in that area and there are a lot of local groups and resources. Here, homeschoolers are much more isolated from one another and it isn't common, so it would be viewed as odd.

#47 kitten18

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Posted 09 March 2013 - 04:46 PM

Today, I was introduced to a friend's friend at a get together. Homeschooling came up immediately, after he asked where my kids went to school. The guy was very quick to make it clear that he didn't agree with homeschooling: "Who on earth gives you the authority to educate your kids yourself when you don't even have a teaching degree?"

When I began to formulate a reply, he shut me down and told me that "children should obviously be in school". Another person joined in the conversation to say that he also thought homeschooling was wrong. Parents may help their kids with homework, but should not have the chance to decide which curriculum their kids use. I talked to my friend about the conversation afterwards, and he said that he believed most people would oppose the decision to homeschool, though they may not voice their opinions.

I was shocked, quite frankly. I didn't realize homeschooling was seen as that controversial. Sure, some people would disagree, but shouldn't they at least think about the issue in some depth before expressing any views beyond perhaps "I wouldn't want to homeschool my own children"?

Wow, that was incredibly rude. I would have been shocked and felt like they were ganging up on me.

But honestly most people are either pleasantly interested or just mind their own business and could care less.

That pretty much sums up my experience.

Maybe it's just because homeschooling has become so normal *to me*, that I just don't notice the negative reactions. In other words, maybe I am naive about what others really think about homeschooling.

#48 Dialectica

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Posted 09 March 2013 - 04:47 PM

Yes, controversial. Public schools may not be perfect, but there exist standards that can ideally be met, standards developed through critical analysis of the facts and based on logical reasoning. I say ideally, because clearly that doesn't always happen, but at least there is the ability to make corrections once information has been revealed. In one's home, there are no such standards, and precious little information or accountability. The ability of the parent to sequester the child from a variety of knowledge essentially oppresses them from available information. This affects society as a whole, not just the individual child. That some communities encourage this is problematic to those of us who desire an educated society rather than an intentionally ignorant one.

Example of problems of home education:
http://youtu.be/DH_wPUVlJ38

I don't think the answer is mandatory public education, and I don't think the answer is necessarily more oversight into home education. As one who watches my children learn without the benefit of a formal curriculum, I appreciate the freedom to personalize my children's learning experiences. I do think one answer is to encourage home educators to understand and appreciate the value of education.


Thanks for sharing that — that video was fascinating to watch. I get the idea of checks and balances within the public school system. Nobody could argue that there is any scrutiny within the public school system where we live, however. The system is highly corrupt and has all but collapsed, just like the rest of the country. Anecdotal evidence, but more than one friend has had to bribe teachers to obtain good grades for their kids, even when they actually accomplished a good test score.

It is precisely because everyone knows that the public school system is so horrendous — and because EVERYONE with kids inside it complains about it — that I do not understand the fierce opposition to homeschooling. You don't like what you see? You're horrified with it? You think anyone could do a better job educating your kids than the current teacher? The obvious answer is to DIY it. Right? But apparently not. The same people who complain loudly about the system are appalled at the thought of opting out of it. This, I simply don't comprehend.

I understand the idea behind careful oversight of homeschool families, and would not mind some government scrutiny. I do not want anyone telling me how to run my homeschool, but if they want to see what we are doing, they're free to come and look. They'll soon see that whatever I'm doing works better than what the local public school is doing does, and not because I am such a great teacher but because the standards here are just that low.

What I can't understand is the blanket condemnation of homeschooling, without understanding... anything about it, at all.

#49 Mom0012

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Posted 09 March 2013 - 04:47 PM

nm

#50 delaney

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Posted 09 March 2013 - 04:50 PM

I imagine that I have very little in common with the woman in this video.

But, I think she has the right to teach her children her beliefs. I agree that her children are sequestered from a variety of viewpoints, but I think it's her right to decide what to teach -- even if many of us find it concerning.

I think it more has to do with weird is weird and the kids will be weird as well. No matter what they are taught. Apples and trees.


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