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Pulling dyslexic 7th grader from PS


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#1 Izzy

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Posted 06 December 2012 - 07:27 PM

He was just diagnosed last month so is very behind. He is in a dyslexia class in school but just started a week ago. He is DROWNING in homework and just got home from school at 6:00. He goes early and stays late and spends a couple of Saturdays a month in Saturday school. It's ridiculous! All of this and he's not retaining a single thing. So where do I start? He's homeschooled before and hates it. He loves his friends, loves being on the football team, and loves shop class. I just don't know what to do. Pulling him seems like the best thing for his future but I'm worried he'll be unhappy as he's my social butterfly. I think it's inevitable though and I need to look into curriculum. Does anyone have any suggestions for what might work really well for a dyslexic who is behind? I have his scores and he basically tested 3rd to 4th grade on everything but listening comprehension and math which he scored really well in.

I've been telling the school for years that there is something more wrong and now that they finally know they still aren't changing much! I'm so ready to be done dealing with them. :/

#2 Shellers

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Posted 06 December 2012 - 09:27 PM

Does he have an IEP?

#3 Izzy

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Posted 06 December 2012 - 09:59 PM

Just a 504. They won't do an IEP for dyslexia. Oddly enough, he had an IEP up until 5th grade for a language arts LD.

#4 Heathermomster

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Posted 06 December 2012 - 10:15 PM

My DS is 7th grade with dyslexia/dysgraphia/dyscalculia and gifted. He has huge verbal comprehension and abstract reasoning with low WM and processing speed.

Well, for 6th grade the homework became too much and he knew it. He was in a private Christian school and has known many of the same children since pre-K. Missing football with his friends was very hard this year, and he loves the coach. Fortunately the coach happens to be his youth Sunday school teacher. By the end of 6th grade, DS came to the realization that he should come home.

I found a homeschool cover that has kids DS knows and we go to church with. He participates in a band for homeschoolers once per week. He takes a writing class with 3 other boys each Monday. He plays video games over the Internet with friends from the school. All the time, he gets texted by boys and girls from the school. Air soft is big right now, so DH will take DS and a few of his friends to have air soft battles. He watches his friends play football. For 7th grade, I expected a big pit of loneliness at home but that never happened. He actually likes homeschooling.

By 7th grade and no intervention, maybe look into hiring a Wilson or OG reading specialist. Look at Barton if you don't want to hire reading out. Look at writing programs that teach explicitly. DS is taught writing using IEW by an OG tutor. IEW is very challenging, but we are seeing positive results. We use Math U See for math. For Bible, we use Starr Meade's Old and New Testament survey. For history, we study Ancients using Pandia Press History Odyssey level 2 with Oxford-University Press Ancients history books. For science, we use several texts. For LA, we use Winston Grammar Basic and portions of Easy Grammar 6. We formally study vocabulary with a Sadlier-Oxford book and use English from the Roots up cards.

DS listens to audio books, watches documentaries, and types everything except math. Even his history timeline is on the computer. I have found that we get the best results when I teach to my son's learning style and interests.

It's too bad that your child cannot finish the school year. It's very hard to pull them mid-year. and I understand your pains and concerns. These kids have needs, and we want them to love learning.

ETA: Take a look at Overcoming Dyslexia by Sally Shaywitz and The Dyslexic Advantage by the Eides. These books have helped me tremendously get a handle on my child's needs.

#5 RamonaQ

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Posted 07 December 2012 - 08:11 AM

Have you met with the school to discuss the homework? A standard accommodation on a 504 is reduced homework. I would never discourage (or encourage) you to homeschool, but I do think it could be extra challenging with a 7th grade boy who does not want to be there. I would be looking at ways to compromise....perhaps he goes to middle school for part of the day, or you find a co-op/ group learning environment, or you negotiate with the school that you will do remediation at home so no language arts there (maybe just a study hall).

I agree with Heathermomster's advice on tutoring and explicit writing. You could also check out Verticy, which is an all-in-one bundled program and the writing instruction is excellent.

#6 Izzy

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Posted 07 December 2012 - 12:17 PM

I've tried to compromise with the school but they won't budge. He is in a Reading 180 test for dyslexia but is still in LA 7th which above his abilities. The only accompdations he gets are having tests read aloud to him and having notes given to him. He is still expected to do a full homework load which he is never caught up on. In a perfect world, he'd homeschool LA, Math, Science, and History but go to school for his dyslexia class, shop class, and football team. Our state doesn't allow homeschoolers to do that. :/ I am just so stressed and torn over this. He was at school from 7:45 to 6pm yesterday and still had a ton of homework. His averages for math, LA, and science are in the 30's. Texas History is a 54. The low averages are mostly due to homework. Especially in math as he's really good at math. I don't want to pull him out mid year because it would be so hard for him. The Co-ops are closed to new students and I think he'd be bored without being able to go to a school at least once a week. We do have a homeschool football league but it's 6 man and he'd rather play football with his school. He's pretty rigid and doesn't respond to change very well. I'm also homeschooling my first grader and K-er and when he gets bored he harasses them. I need him busy.

This is such a tough decision for us to make. DS is struggling with what to do also. I hate that he has to choose between education and being in public school where he wants to be. :(



#7 Izzy

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Posted 07 December 2012 - 12:21 PM



By 7th grade and no intervention, maybe look into hiring a Wilson or OG reading specialist. Look at Barton if you don't want to hire reading out. Look at writing programs that teach explicitly. DS is taught writing using IEW by an OG tutor. IEW is very challenging, but we are seeing positive results. We use Math U See for math. For Bible, we use Starr Meade's Old and New Testament survey. For history, we study Ancients using Pandia Press History Odyssey level 2 with Oxford-University Press Ancients history books. For science, we use several texts. For LA, we use Winston Grammar Basic and portions of Easy Grammar 6. We formally study vocabulary with a Sadlier-Oxford book and use English from the Roots up cards.

DS listens to audio books, watches documentaries, and types everything except math. Even his history timeline is on the computer. I have found that we get the best results when I teach to my son's learning style and interests.

These are all really good suggestions. Thanks! I looked at Winston Grammar and it looks like it would be a good fit for dyslexia. I had already been looking at History Odyssey so that's nice to hear it works. I also have Dyslexic Advantage but need to buy Overcoming Dyslexia. :)

#8 Izzy

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Posted 07 December 2012 - 12:22 PM

^^^i could not figure out how to quite^^^ :)

#9 Heathermomster

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Posted 07 December 2012 - 01:30 PM

History Odyssey requires summarizing and outlining. Basically, I modify the program to suit my son's needs. So far, DS hates the historical fiction lists from HO Ancients. K12 Human Odyssey vol 1 is a great history text for Ancients and Middle Ages. Many moms here can advise you with alternatives. With homeschool comes the freedom that you need to tweak what fits and what doesn't. Give yourself permission to tweak. My son's education is somewhat traditional in its approach; however, many moms do teach in whatever manner works for their children and that's ok.

Veritas Press has an online history class that OhElizabeth's DD used last year. Perhaps she'll tell you about it. There should be online video samples. Sometimes hs programs go on sale mid year. Keep an eye out for curriculum sales.

#10 RamonaQ

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Posted 07 December 2012 - 03:05 PM

This is such a tough decision for us to make. DS is struggling with what to do also. I hate that he has to choose between education and being in public school where he wants to be. :(


Yes. I would agree....especially after seeing those scores and hearing the amount of time he is at school. It just seems like it is failing. It is really frustrating that your state won't allow you to partially homeschool.

#11 Izzy

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Posted 07 December 2012 - 03:15 PM

I just read my post again and I'm embarrassed at all of my spelling mistakes. I'm on my phone and don't proofread. :D

This is so stressful for me and DH & I feel it's best for him to come home. His education needs to come first even if he doesn't see that. He also needs a lot of therapy which he can't do right now due to missing school. He would be that more bogged down with missed homework.

#12 Heathermomster

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Posted 07 December 2012 - 03:23 PM

Just because he comes home now, doesn't mean that he has to be home schooled forever. If he's motivated and gets up to par, he could return for high school. Throw out a carrot and shoot for 11th grade. (I just threw a random grade level out there. The grade is up to you and your son). Obviously, look into public high school requirements now, so that no troubles arise at a later date.

#13 Pen

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Posted 08 December 2012 - 08:36 PM

He was just diagnosed last month so is very behind. He is in a dyslexia class in school but just started a week ago. He is DROWNING in homework and just got home from school at 6:00. He goes early and stays late and spends a couple of Saturdays a month in Saturday school. It's ridiculous! All of this and he's not retaining a single thing. So where do I start? He's homeschooled before and hates it. He loves his friends, loves being on the football team, and loves shop class. I just don't know what to do. Pulling him seems like the best thing for his future but I'm worried he'll be unhappy as he's my social butterfly. I think it's inevitable though and I need to look into curriculum. Does anyone have any suggestions for what might work really well for a dyslexic who is behind? I have his scores and he basically tested 3rd to 4th grade on everything but listening comprehension and math which he scored really well in.

I've been telling the school for years that there is something more wrong and now that they finally know they still aren't changing much! I'm so ready to be done dealing with them. :/



Don't know if he should stay in school or go home, but one thing I note is that he is doing football. I know he loves it, but sports tend to take a lot of time and it sounds like he does not have that. If he goes home he won't have fb anyway. Maybe dropping it would give some breathing room.

Being mostly in 3rd to 4th grade level sounds pretty serious. Middle and high school are short, but then there is the rest of life. In or out of school, he'll need to work toward that rest and what he can do with it. Improving academics sounds important, and like a reason to bring him home, but, maybe the shop area is an area of strength and would be a reason to stay with the school if it is excellent.

If he is not getting anything out of the extra class sessions at school, maybe you could let him stay in school for awhile, but do things at home in those extra class times. Or maybe he could come home for some class sessions or outside tutoring as part of his 504 while still enrolled, instead of being officially a homeschooler.

Maybe seeing some motivational movies like Gifted Hands about Ben Carson who went from failing school to doing excellently, or one I found specifically about dyslexia (posted before, but can't now recall title) would help?

#14 Izzy

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Posted 09 December 2012 - 09:07 PM

Football season is over so he's not playing right now but he wants to play again next year. I totally agree that his future is much more important than failing middle school to stay with friends. He is doing all he can to stay in school right now and I have to admire his persistence. That persistence will serve him well in the future. I know in my heart he would be better off at home and it breaks my heart that he knows that's what's coming but is sticking it out as long as he can. :( DH and I have even thought about going to the principal or school board because he deserves better than this.

I put Gifted Hands on my wish list. Looks like a good one!



#15 Izzy

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Posted 09 December 2012 - 09:12 PM

Heather, that was my thought too. If he just HSed for half of 7th and all of 8th he'd be so much better prepared for high school. We have homeschool football and one day a week schools plus a pretty active homeschool group.

#16 Heathermomster

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Posted 09 December 2012 - 09:27 PM

I pulled my own DS mid year 5th grade to teach typing. I bribed big time and had to deliver on some promises. When he returned for 6th grade, he did very well with an A average even. Homework was a nightmare though, and he just became tired.

If you pull DS, push the reason off on the school. It's the truth anyways. They absolutely refuse to accommodate and teach him in a way that he needs to be taught. He's a smart kid. Hug him a lot and remind him that you are on the same team. If he ever wants to play ball in high school or college, GPA matters. Good luck whatever you decide.

Eta: I realize you homeschooled in the past. Today is a new day. Look at what worked and keep...Toss the rest. You can do this way better than what the ps is currently providing.

#17 Pen

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Posted 09 December 2012 - 09:40 PM

Football season is over so he's not playing right now but he wants to play again next year. I totally agree that his future is much more important than failing middle school to stay with friends. He is doing all he can to stay in school right now and I have to admire his persistence. That persistence will serve him well in the future. I know in my heart he would be better off at home and it breaks my heart that he knows that's what's coming but is sticking it out as long as he can. :( DH and I have even thought about going to the principal or school board because he deserves better than this.

I put Gifted Hands on my wish list. Looks like a good one!



Possibly if you say to school officials that you are on edge of leaving to homeschool, they would make better accommodations for you within what your state law can allow (enrolled students in many places mean $$$ to the school). I thought maybe letting him leave school for what he needs while "enrolled" rather than being homeschooled and doing things there could be something your state could allow. I do not know Texas rules. I did spend a while learning what I could about my state's rules and federal ones before trying to work with the school as a homeschooler, and it helped to have that background and not automatically accept what I was told as true. At present, what my son is doing at the ps is really enjoying some social time--I can't say it is actually a lot of help anymore in learning. But he does like the social part. The other thing is that he gets test accommodations when test time comes, and that does help.

Remotely possible, maybe your son himself could make an appointment with some appropriate seeming school official to try to get help from them. I don't know how 504's work, but I know my ds is allowed to be in IEP meetings to discuss his own situation. A child advocating for himself might actually get some good attention as well as being good practice, and if it did not get anywhere, then maybe you could try as the next step. Perhaps with all of you looking up the laws first. ?????? Also the Shaywitz book Overcoming Dyslexia helped me a great deal.

Does he have audio materials to help him get through his work? (Learning Ally or Bookshare) That could help a lot.

Gifted Hands also comes as book for kids, as well as for adults. I was thinking though that movie might be better if there is a reading problem.

#18 DyslexicParent

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Posted 11 December 2012 - 06:58 PM

Please educate me why homeschooling would be the solution in these situations. When homework resulted in oppositional defiance with DD here in Canada, it was the school that decided to stop giving her homework. Studies have shown that homework is not necessary in elementary school anyway. While my grade 6 child has ADHD, dyslexia, etc., she likes going to school and I see many more disadvantages if I tried to homeschool her instead. I am trying to get her caught up from Grade 4 reading level by doing an Orton-Gillingham lesson every night.

Well, for 6th grade the homework became too much and he knew it. He was in a private Christian school and has known many of the same children since pre-K. Missing football with his friends was very hard this year, and he loves the coach. Fortunately the coach happens to be his youth Sunday school teacher. By the end of 6th grade, DS came to the realization that he should come home.



#19 Heathermomster

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Posted 11 December 2012 - 08:15 PM

Please educate me why homeschooling would be the solution in these situations. When homework resulted in oppositional defiance with DD here in Canada, it was the school that decided to stop giving her homework. Studies have shown that homework is not necessary in elementary school anyway. While my grade 6 child has ADHD, dyslexia, etc., she likes going to school and I see many more disadvantages if I tried to homeschool her instead. I am trying to get her caught up from Grade 4 reading level by doing an Orton-Gillingham lesson every night.


The OP 's son is presently receiving no helps at the school. They refuse to reduce his homework. They have been obtuse and thrown up road blocks. He is 13 years old. At home, the OP can hire the helps or do the helps herself during the day without interference. Direct one on one instruction with an educator that is motivated to help him.

If you choose to keep your child in public school, that's your business. I don't recall addressing anyone but the OP with regards to this matter.

ETA: In spite of football, my son loves homeschooling now. We were with friends all afternoon today and will be at a Christmas party tomorrow night. It's been great.

#20 Izzy

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Posted 12 December 2012 - 11:05 AM

Yay! He's decided to HS after the holidays. I truly feel this will be best for him. He'll be able to do OT 3 times a week which I think will help tremendously. The school won't let him miss that much time and there is a waiting list for after school OT. I have some ideas of which curriculum to buy for him but I'm so scared of making the wrong choice. With him being 13 and behind I feel like I need to get this right the first time. :) Thanks to everyone for your help! I know this is the right decision.

#21 merry gardens

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Posted 12 December 2012 - 02:51 PM

Yay! He's decided to HS after the holidays. I truly feel this will be best for him. He'll be able to do OT 3 times a week which I think will help tremendously. The school won't let him miss that much time and there is a waiting list for after school OT. I have some ideas of which curriculum to buy for him but I'm so scared of making the wrong choice. With him being 13 and behind I feel like I need to get this right the first time. :) Thanks to everyone for your help! I know this is the right decision.

Since you wrote what I bolded about feeling the need to get it right the first time, I encourage you to look into Barton Reading and Spelling. The cost of the program includes teaching the teacher (you) in the Orton-Gillingham method. If it is prohibitively expensive, you might check out Wilson Reading, which is another Orton-Gillingham program. Orton Gillingham is well proven for teaching people with dyslexia to read. Barton is scripted, which makes it much easier to give trained dyslexic tutor quality teaching at home for much less than private tutoring.

There's a screen for potential Barton students-- and even if you don't use the program, it's worth giving to see if he passes. http://bartonreading...dents_long.html

#22 ElizabethB

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Posted 13 December 2012 - 12:15 AM

:grouphug:

You can have him try my online lessons while you are figuring out what to use. My how to tutor page also has a lot of ideas. Nonsense words and Webster's Speller have been helpful for my remedial students diagnosed with dyslexia.

Here is my how to tutor page:
http://www.thephonic...howtotutor.html

For OG programs, I think the most flexible and cheapest combo is "Recipe for Reading" followed by Sophris West Rewards. For Recipe for Reading, it is $27, you can just write the words on a white board and use just the manual.

http://eps.schoolspe...seriesonly=491M

You can work through Recipe for Reading and Rewards in a year, Barton usually takes at least 2 years, and many students take 3 or 4 to work through Barton.

#23 Izzy

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Posted 13 December 2012 - 09:49 AM

Thanks, Elizabeth! I found out that he doesn't qualify for his dyslexia class anymore since he's homeschooling. But that's okay because if you see my other thread you'll know why I don't trust them at all. I keep reading about Barton but it's pricey. I'm pretty sure my first grader is dyslexic too so I would use it on both of them. I also have 2 younger kids and I suppose there's always that chance they could be dyslexic too. My mind is reeling right now and I'm tempted to give him December off while I figure this all out. Heaven knows he deserves after how hard he's worked this semester.

#24 Lecka

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Posted 13 December 2012 - 10:36 AM

Your comments about the school and test results are frightening. And Texas is supposed to be a good state for dyslexia! (Though maybe it is a recent thing, and they didn't have the stuff in place when your son was younger?) My state is supposed to be bad. My son's K teacher was very blunt/mean with saying how behind my son was, and she was somewhat rude to me, and made a very bad impression on my husband, that was obviously mutual. I did not get the pleasant "everything is going well" that some other people get. If I was getting it -- I doubt I would know anything was wrong, either. My son's school even does the Dibels screening, but then don't seem to know why they are doing it or offer any early help. So I was able to have his Dibels scores when I started researching, too. It did take thinking that the school/teacher had a negative opinion of my whole family, to get me to overcome my feeling that the school could help. I hadn't even been able to help my son learn all his letters and letter sounds before he started K! So anyway, I don't think you could have known. The important thing is that you know now, and that you don't keep your head in the sand (which you are not doing). I think you are being a great model for your son of love and care for him.

My son is still in public school and I afterschool, btw, that is what works for us. But I do a lot with my son after school, on weekends, and plan to do a lot this summer. I did a lot with him the last two summers. He would not get any particular special help until 3rd grade, and then only if he was very behind. The RTI pull-out group he started 1st grade in..... seems to make 1/2 grade of progress per year. So kids will be a full year behind in 3rd grade, and that is if they are even getting a good foundation (I don't know). My friend's son is in this, but the teachers are really nice to her. I don't know if her son has more serious problems than mine in some way. I don't think so, to be honest. I think my son was worse than hers at the beginning of 1st grade. But she still thinks it is all a good deal. So frustrating.


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