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Sonlight, "Open and go" my foot.


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#1 lilybrooke14

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Posted 01 August 2012 - 02:54 PM

I've just spent an entire day trying to get supplementary projects, worksheets (dd likes worksheets), and such arranged for Sonlight. It didn't take long to realize that it was a lot of reading and not much else. Once you start adding to it the "open and go" curriculum choice is a lot of work! I'll admit that part of the issue is rabbit holes, and there is just SO MUCH out there! But finding it, choosing it, organizing it, whew!

I'm starting to feel like I'm putting more into this curriculum than Sonlight did. They might be getting a return in a few weeks.

#2 Tibbie Dunbar

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Posted 01 August 2012 - 03:26 PM

Well, if you use it as designed it is 100% open and go. Sonlight is pretty upfront about not having activities or worksheets, so I'm sorry you didn't realize that until you started working with it.

Some of my children have done very, very well with Sonlight. They tend to remember everything they ever learn from books without the need of worksheets or tests. Some people's minds work that way, and Sonlight is perfect for them.

Others of my children don't retain one single thing from Sonlight. They need the activities and reinforcing assignments. Rather than spending hours trying to make Sonlight something it's not, I just choose other curriculum for them. If you do add lots more, I wouldn't be surprised if you do end up sending SL back. Their method of reading lots of books every day really doesn't allow time to do those activities. You start feeling like a dog chasing its tail, trying to shoehorn the SOTW AG into a Sonlight week, for example.

When I do use Sonlight, the only change I make is to not use the LA (and that change takes no time or planning, I just omit it). We use R&S English instead. I then add Math, Science, Latin, and that's the school day. For my SL students I choose do-the-next-lesson style curriculum for other subjects, as well, so all of their work is open and go. No planning.

Edited by Tibbie Dunbar, 01 August 2012 - 03:28 PM.


#3 Heart_Mom

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Posted 01 August 2012 - 03:29 PM

I think it is open and go if you and your children love, love, love to read and discuss.

Personally, I would be happy to read to my children all day long, and they would love that too. We had to leave Sonlight because their book selections were too edgy for my family, but I absolutely LOVE that model.

Not every family loves that, though. If you're feeling like you have to add activities and assignments, maybe a different curriculum would be better for you. (Heart of Dakota has everything planned out for you. ;) )

#4 Maverick_Mom

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Posted 01 August 2012 - 03:31 PM

I see that you're new here -- welcome :) -- and I sincerely hope you will take this in the gentle spirit in which it's intended. If you are gathering supplemental projects and worksheets, it's not because Sonlight instructed you to. You're tweaking the program, and that's what's creating the extra work. Tweaking is okay -- I could qualify for the gold medal in it :D -- and people do it in order to meet the needs of their child or their particular situation. That's perfectly acceptable -- but understand that *that* is what is generating the extra time and effort.

Now -- is Sonlight in its raw form "open and go"? I've used two Cores and didn't think so. If nothing else, there's the organization you need to do of all the books and the IG before you start. That's not necessarily a bad thing. I just think that there *is* work involved before you can reach that magical point (if it exists ;)) of "open and go."

Please don't think I'm shooting you down. I have plenty of criticisms of SL, but the amount of extra work isn't one of them. ;)

#5 mumto2

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Posted 01 August 2012 - 03:56 PM

I see that you're new here -- welcome :) -- and I sincerely hope you will take this in the gentle spirit in which it's intended. If you are gathering supplemental projects and worksheets, it's not because Sonlight instructed you to. You're tweaking the program, and that's what's creating the extra work. Tweaking is okay -- I could qualify for the gold medal in it :D -- and people do it in order to meet the needs of their child or their particular situation. That's perfectly acceptable -- but understand that *that* is what is generating the extra time and effort.

Now -- is Sonlight in its raw form "open and go"? I've used two Cores and didn't think so. If nothing else, there's the organization you need to do of all the books and the IG before you start. That's not necessarily a bad thing. I just think that there *is* work involved before you can reach that magical point (if it exists ;)) of "open and go."

Please don't think I'm shooting you down. I have plenty of criticisms of SL, but the amount of extra work isn't one of them. ;)

:iagree: Iam not sure how old you dc's are but if they are young I used things like "History Pockets" and " Draw Write Now" for many of my tweaking urges. If we did them great if not they were there for another day. I did not schedule them unless a connection was too good to miss. I saved them for rainy days and Saturdays. I think you will find it is a pretty full curriculum when you get started. Many of my additions were never used. We did a variety of LA programs and lots of math.

I just want to say welcome. I don't want to scare you away at all. I also have issues with SL but it is a full program if used as one.

#6 Kathryn

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Posted 01 August 2012 - 04:19 PM

I see that you're new here -- welcome :) -- and I sincerely hope you will take this in the gentle spirit in which it's intended. If you are gathering supplemental projects and worksheets, it's not because Sonlight instructed you to. You're tweaking the program, and that's what's creating the extra work. Tweaking is okay -- I could qualify for the gold medal in it :D -- and people do it in order to meet the needs of their child or their particular situation. That's perfectly acceptable -- but understand that *that* is what is generating the extra time and effort.

Now -- is Sonlight in its raw form "open and go"? I've used two Cores and didn't think so. If nothing else, there's the organization you need to do of all the books and the IG before you start. That's not necessarily a bad thing. I just think that there *is* work involved before you can reach that magical point (if it exists ;)) of "open and go."

Please don't think I'm shooting you down. I have plenty of criticisms of SL, but the amount of extra work isn't one of them. ;)


:iagree: I have many issues with Sonlight, but it is *possible* to use it as written and have it be open and go. But, that wasn't really cutting it for DS or me. Among many other reasons, the amount of supplementing I was doing was one reason we left. It's just not right for everyone, and that's okay!

Welcome to the boards!

#7 lilybrooke14

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Posted 01 August 2012 - 04:20 PM

Not at all! I'm open to any and all advice. This is our first year of HS, and my daughter is only in first grade. I was pretty unsure of my decision to order Sonlight for lots of reasons, but I really wanted the schedule for the first year at least. It seems that many of the criticisms of Sonlight I had read about, but I had trouble really visualizing them until after we actually started using it. Then there was the "aha!" moment, and it made more sense.

I had already purchased AAS to supplement the LA. I've been looking at ETC as well, but I don't know if AAS and ETC cover the same material, or if one is necessary without the other.

I got the Core B tips CD, which was where the black hole started. I began looking at the suggestions, and several hours later I realized I'd spent most of the day clicking on links for videos, recipes, coloring sheets, projects, etc. and it was all for the same week! No way I can spend that kind of time on prep every week. I have a six year old and a baby who just learned to walk. They'd mutiny! We just need to find our stride.

#8 AngelBee

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Posted 01 August 2012 - 04:22 PM

:grouphug: It is not Sonlight, it is us crazy teachers! :)

I had and/or do use Sonlight, Tapestry of Grace, and Heart of Dakota.....I tweak them all!!! Hense......making them FAR from open and go! :lol:

#9 AngelBee

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Posted 01 August 2012 - 04:25 PM

Not at all! I'm open to any and all advice. This is our first year of HS, and my daughter is only in first grade. I was pretty unsure of my decision to order Sonlight for lots of reasons, but I really wanted the schedule for the first year at least. It seems that many of the criticisms of Sonlight I had read about, but I had trouble really visualizing them until after we actually started using it. Then there was the "aha!" moment, and it made more sense.

I had already purchased AAS to supplement the LA. I've been looking at ETC as well, but I don't know if AAS and ETC cover the same material, or if one is necessary without the other.

I got the Core B tips CD, which was where the black hole started. I began looking at the suggestions, and several hours later I realized I'd spent most of the day clicking on links for videos, recipes, coloring sheets, projects, etc. and it was all for the same week! No way I can spend that kind of time on prep every week. I have a six year old and a baby who just learned to walk. They'd mutiny! We just need to find our stride.


Core B....ok....here is what I would do. :)

Do SL as written. Then, as your dd expresses interest, go to tip disc and click what applies. :)

Only enrich areas she expresses extra interest. First couple weeks, PUT DISC IN HIDING!!! :tongue_smilie: Stick to finding your rhythm and getting into a good grove. Enjoy time outside and cuddling with all the great books.

WELCOME TO THE HIVE! :grouphug:

#10 Down_the_Rabbit_Hole

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Posted 01 August 2012 - 04:32 PM

:iagree: I have many issues with Sonlight, but it is *possible* to use it as written and have it be open and go. But, that wasn't really cutting it for DS or me. Among many other reasons, the amount of supplementing I was doing was one reason we left. It's just not right for everyone, and that's okay!

Welcome to the boards!

:iagree:
Open and go for just reading SL core books. That is if you as the teacher do not do any prereading. If you add in anything else, science, math, language...you need to do some oganizing, preparing and rearranging. Personally I think the advertising is a tad misleading.

In all my years of HS I have only found one true open and go curriculum, Calvert. For all other curriculum, if they say open and go I take it with a grain of salt.

#11 gratitude

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Posted 01 August 2012 - 04:37 PM

I have used Sonlight & MFW. I Wanted them to be 'open and go' :lol:. After 3 years of home schooling I have come to realize that open and go and educating my individual children doesn't really go hand in hand. I also realized that when I tried to make MFW open and go I missed a lot of the potential of the curriculum by not putting all of the extra work that is really needed to be put into it. I think you could use SL as is, but you still need to add math, LA, science, (unless you use their LA and science). Plus you may choose to do note booking for history or hands on activities!

#12 Navywife2chief

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Posted 01 August 2012 - 04:38 PM

I am using Sonlight for the first time with my middle school child. I have always wanted to use it but stayed away. I am glad I waited until middleschool. We used it as is, open and go and somedays my child will do two days of work mostly due to her love of reading. My younger ones need more hands on and worksheets so I do not use Sonlight with them. They thrive with the hands one and lots of activies unlike my oldest.

#13 Flaura

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Posted 01 August 2012 - 04:39 PM

In all my years of HS I have only found one true open and go curriculum, Calvert. For all other curriculum, if they say open and go I take it with a grain of salt.


:iagree:

#14 lilybrooke14

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Posted 01 August 2012 - 05:08 PM

:iagree:
Open and go for just reading SL core books. That is if you as the teacher do not do any prereading. If you add in anything else, science, math, language...you need to do some oganizing, preparing and rearranging. Personally I think the advertising is a tad misleading.

In all my years of HS I have only found one true open and go curriculum, Calvert. For all other curriculum, if they say open and go I take it with a grain of salt.


Yes, I ordered the core and the science, plus AAS, Saxon math, Artistic Pursuits, and a book about nature journaling.

I think the advice about hiding the tips for now is sound.

Does anyone know if ETC would be good to add in? Or is AAS enough?

#15 AngelBee

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Posted 01 August 2012 - 05:10 PM

Yes, I ordered the core and the science, plus AAS, Saxon math, Artistic Pursuits, and a book about nature journaling.

I think the advice about hiding the tips for now is sound.

Does anyone know if ETC would be good to add in? Or is AAS enough?


I can't think of what ETC is right now. :tongue_smilie: Brain freeze.....different kind. :lol:

Have heard great things about AAS though.

#16 LittleIzumi

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Posted 01 August 2012 - 05:11 PM

I had already purchased AAS to supplement the LA. I've been looking at ETC as well, but I don't know if AAS and ETC cover the same material, or if one is necessary without the other.


ETC is more of a quick reading/phonics review, while AAS is fairly intensive but intuitive spelling. We dropped ETC but still love AAS.

#17 lilybrooke14

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Posted 01 August 2012 - 05:21 PM

ETC is Explode the Code.

#18 Kathryn

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Posted 01 August 2012 - 05:25 PM

Yes, I ordered the core and the science, plus AAS, Saxon math, Artistic Pursuits, and a book about nature journaling.

I think the advice about hiding the tips for now is sound.

Does anyone know if ETC would be good to add in? Or is AAS enough?


ETC is phonics, AAS is spelling. We did both, but the ETC was review since DS started reading young. Are you using SL language arts? How is your child at reading?

#19 Yolanda

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Posted 01 August 2012 - 05:32 PM

Agreeing ETC (explode the code) is more of a review. In fact, my dd went through it but didn't put it together when writing or reading other things. Could just be my dd.

But I've heard of many who use it alone.

We just started AAS and it's good for dd, very poor speller. I've heard that for those that are mostly good spellers but the parent wants a little something for them, not a great fit-too easy and too expensive.

#20 KAM

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Posted 01 August 2012 - 06:21 PM

SL is open and go for us, but that's b/c I don't supplement it with much of anything. Actually I can't think of anything I supplement it with. I use lots of other things for other subjects, but I don't try to add to what is already there for lit, history, or science. I bought the tip CD's but never use them. My kids don't like worksheets though and I can't handle a lot of projects, so that works for us.

I won't buy any future tips CD's b/c I agree they are a black hole- it takes too much time to look at the links and figure out what to add in.

#21 thenichols

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Posted 01 August 2012 - 06:24 PM

I agree. I've been tweaking for a week now, so fun & crazy. But I could have just started with no help from me. :grouphug:

#22 TranquilMind

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Posted 01 August 2012 - 06:28 PM

I've just spent an entire day trying to get supplementary projects, worksheets (dd likes worksheets), and such arranged for Sonlight. It didn't take long to realize that it was a lot of reading and not much else. Once you start adding to it the "open and go" curriculum choice is a lot of work! I'll admit that part of the issue is rabbit holes, and there is just SO MUCH out there! But finding it, choosing it, organizing it, whew!

I'm starting to feel like I'm putting more into this curriculum than Sonlight did. They might be getting a return in a few weeks.

Oh, it is a great curriculum for those who just want to read a lot. It was perfect for my young kids.

However, the arrangement of the 10 billion papers that came with it was so frustrating that I used to have my husband arrange each core in notebooks. I just didn't have the patience.

#23 Hen

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Posted 01 August 2012 - 06:51 PM

Lily,

I had that problem, too. I keep dreaming of the perfect curriculum program. My problem, I am a worksheet girl, I love some kind of worksheet to cement what we are learning. The closest I have come to what I like is Story of the World with the activity book. I stayed with SL for a few years because at least it kept me moving with the schedule, but I was always making up my own worksheets or looking through my STOW activity books for something that would apply. I'm moving on to MFW this year- my hopes continue to cause me to spend money...

good luck on your first year! May you find the perfect curriculum for your house :)

#24 lilybrooke14

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Posted 01 August 2012 - 10:10 PM

Thank you for the warm welcome! My daughter is not a strong reader. She likes the I Can Read It! Books that came with the LA so far, and I was hoping the AAS would fill the gaps. We tried Teach Your Child To Read In 100 Easy Lessons, but she hated it. She was crying every time I brought it out, so I stopped. In her PS kindergarten they focused on sight reading with no phonics. She didn't do very well with it at all, but her teacher insisted she was right on target. Same with learning to write. Now we have to start over and break bad habits.

I am trying to use the Sonlight LA, but I haven't really seen much in the way of instruction so far. They have ETC scheduled in the IG, which is why I started second guessing myself about not ordering it. I may wind up getting Zaner Blozer or another handwriting book as well.

#25 sewingmama

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Posted 01 August 2012 - 10:52 PM

If you are looking for a literature based curriculum that has worksheets and extra activities included already then take a look at Moving Beyond the Page.

We use it and I usually just click on the next lesson without pre-reading and off I go. They give you a list of all the things you will need to complete the activities so at the beginning of the unit you gather the items (all easy to find) and then do the unit. I usually read through the lesson about 5 minutes before I'm going to give it and it always works fine. It has tons of worksheets if thats what you are looking for.

You do have to add in your own maths and phonics programs but that's it.

#26 LittleIzumi

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Posted 01 August 2012 - 11:35 PM

Thank you for the warm welcome! My daughter is not a strong reader. She likes the I Can Read It! Books that came with the LA so far, and I was hoping the AAS would fill the gaps. We tried Teach Your Child To Read In 100 Easy Lessons, but she hated it. She was crying every time I brought it out, so I stopped. In her PS kindergarten they focused on sight reading with no phonics. She didn't do very well with it at all, but her teacher insisted she was right on target. Same with learning to write. Now we have to start over and break bad habits.

I am trying to use the Sonlight LA, but I haven't really seen much in the way of instruction so far. They have ETC scheduled in the IG, which is why I started second guessing myself about not ordering it. I may wind up getting Zaner Blozer or another handwriting book as well.


Then ETC might be a good idea--it sounds like she could use a quick phonics review.

#27 Jennay

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Posted 01 August 2012 - 11:36 PM

I don't use the SL Core Tips CDs or whatever they are called. This is what I add to the SL Core:
Videos from you tube
Google images
Videos from the library on whatever topic we are reading about
Field Trips - we are doing Core D now - so Yorktown, Jamestown, Williamsburg, etc. Next year will be lots of Civil War sites.
Some extra non-fiction books like Eyewitness books, etc. to have in a "book basket"
Extra readers for my voracious readers (some historical, most not) for free reading - we don't discuss these
Hands and Hearts Kits for hands-on projects
For my dd who loves to color I will add coloring books.
We also use the SL Book of Time.
I think that's it.
I don't follow the IG by the day, just the general flow.
We also use SL Science. I add Math, Latin, AAS, Wordly Wise, and FLL/AAS with some SL LA.

#28 SFM

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Posted 01 August 2012 - 11:56 PM

I just sent back MOST of my Sonlight. We were using Core D and it just wasn't a fit for us. My son is an excellent reader and we love all of the books and I LOVE LOVE LOVE the idea of Sonlight and still feel like I might use it in the future. I didn't care for the LA or Science and I just felt I was not using it "as is" I was supplementing, not because of Sonlight but because I liked pulling in different things and resources and curricula that we enjoyed that wasn't Sonlight related. My kids and I really like SOTW so we used that instead of Sonlight's history. This is our first year homeschooling and I tell people that Sonlight gave me the confidence I needed and I think they are a really great company. I love the literature based curriculum but I just kept the books and sent back most of the rest. We are now using things that we are more interested in and I have decided that I actually like piecing things together. I love Sonlight's reading selections. So, there ya have it. I think if I had used it just how they had it laid out it would have worked but I was using too many other things that I liked better, it just didn't make sense to keep it.

Also, for what it's worth we use ETC and AAS, we love both, my son LOVES both and I have seen an increase in his Spelling ability, it's been AWESOME, the retention is much better, he loves ETC and the funny sentences.

I think it's just feeling around and finding out what best suits not only your child but your personality as well.

DONE rambling!
:001_smile:

#29 waa510

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Posted 02 August 2012 - 07:09 AM

Thank you for the warm welcome! My daughter is not a strong reader. She likes the I Can Read It! Books that came with the LA so far, and I was hoping the AAS would fill the gaps. We tried Teach Your Child To Read In 100 Easy Lessons, but she hated it. She was crying every time I brought it out, so I stopped. In her PS kindergarten they focused on sight reading with no phonics. She didn't do very well with it at all, but her teacher insisted she was right on target. Same with learning to write. Now we have to start over and break bad habits.

I am trying to use the Sonlight LA, but I haven't really seen much in the way of instruction so far. They have ETC scheduled in the IG, which is why I started second guessing myself about not ordering it. I may wind up getting Zaner Blozer or another handwriting book as well.


AAS is phonics based so that will really help a lot; it's sometimes referred to as 'phonics backwards'. I can imagine it would be slow going though if she isn't already familiar with the phonics rules. ETC would help review that but there are some holes there in teaching all the phonograms. I'd also add in Ordinary Parent's Guide to Teaching Reading, skip to where she is now, and progress from there. It can be dry and dull, but I would write the lesson on a whiteboard and let my girls pick out the marker color (big deal to my girls lol) or play hopscotch and write the words in the squares for her to read as she skipped.

It's given my oldest dd ( and now my little one) a strong foundation.

#30 Jonibee

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Posted 02 August 2012 - 07:36 AM

I've just spent an entire day trying to get supplementary projects, worksheets (dd likes worksheets), and such arranged for Sonlight. It didn't take long to realize that it was a lot of reading and not much else. Once you start adding to it the "open and go" curriculum choice is a lot of work! I'll admit that part of the issue is rabbit holes, and there is just SO MUCH out there! But finding it, choosing it, organizing it, whew!

I'm starting to feel like I'm putting more into this curriculum than Sonlight did. They might be getting a return in a few weeks.


Advice from someone who has used Sonlight since 1996-ish? ----

Dump the CD. Use the IG for open and go. Instead of worksheets, use the timeline or make a notebook. Day 1 of SL, page 1 of notebook. What did your child learn about? They or you write the title. Write a sentence or make a list. Use Google images and find a picture. Done with day 1.

When you finish reading a book, go to Amazon and click copy the picture of the book (or you can probably do that on google images). Put the picture in your notebook. Copy the title, maybe the author. If you or your kid is into it, copy a favorite line from the book. Design a star system for how well they liked it. Use sticker stars if you want -- 1, 2 or 3. Liked, so-so, or not liked.

Simple. Keep it simple. Worksheets are over-rated. Websites are over-rated. Read the books, write a little something (emphasize little). Make a memory. If you do anything related to what you're studying (Lego pyramid, teddy bear shaped snack, whatever) -- take a picture. Add to your notebook.

Dump the CD. Keep it simple. Make a notebook. Your child will like this better than the prettiest worksheet. Remember, worksheets are highly over-rated. :D

#31 Dinsfamily

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Posted 02 August 2012 - 08:05 AM

Not at all! I'm open to any and all advice. This is our first year of HS, and my daughter is only in first grade. I was pretty unsure of my decision to order Sonlight for lots of reasons, but I really wanted the schedule for the first year at least. It seems that many of the criticisms of Sonlight I had read about, but I had trouble really visualizing them until after we actually started using it. Then there was the "aha!" moment, and it made more sense.

I had already purchased AAS to supplement the LA. I've been looking at ETC as well, but I don't know if AAS and ETC cover the same material, or if one is necessary without the other.

I got the Core B tips CD, which was where the black hole started. I began looking at the suggestions, and several hours later I realized I'd spent most of the day clicking on links for videos, recipes, coloring sheets, projects, etc. and it was all for the same week! No way I can spend that kind of time on prep every week. I have a six year old and a baby who just learned to walk. They'd mutiny! We just need to find our stride.


Welcome! You've already got some great advice. I'm in my 4th year of using SL and it's been great for us, but it isn't right for everyone. We love the abundance of books and lack of worksheets. I just want to encourage you to simplify your first year and try not to supplement much at all. Just sit back and enjoy the time with your dd. She will learn plenty with the programs you've chosen. AAS will help her reading and ETC will be fun for a worksheet-loving girl. Next year, you'll have a better working knowledge of dd's limits and interests. Have fun with that baby too! The toddler stage has been tough for me while homeschooling so I like to relish in the cuteness and long naps of babyhood.

#32 SewLittleTime

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Posted 02 August 2012 - 08:36 AM

Advice from someone who has used Sonlight since 1996-ish? ----

Dump the CD. Use the IG for open and go. Instead of worksheets, use the timeline or make a notebook. Day 1 of SL, page 1 of notebook. What did your child learn about? They or you write the title. Write a sentence or make a list. Use Google images and find a picture. Done with day 1.

When you finish reading a book, go to Amazon and click copy the picture of the book (or you can probably do that on google images). Put the picture in your notebook. Copy the title, maybe the author. If you or your kid is into it, copy a favorite line from the book. Design a star system for how well they liked it. Use sticker stars if you want -- 1, 2 or 3. Liked, so-so, or not liked.

Simple. Keep it simple. Worksheets are over-rated. Websites are over-rated. Read the books, write a little something (emphasize little). Make a memory. If you do anything related to what you're studying (Lego pyramid, teddy bear shaped snack, whatever) -- take a picture. Add to your notebook.

Dump the CD. Keep it simple. Make a notebook. Your child will like this better than the prettiest worksheet. Remember, worksheets are highly over-rated. :D

This is great advice.

#33 sewinglady

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Posted 02 August 2012 - 09:56 AM

We love Sonlight! I look at what books we should should read, then open and go. We also love workbooks. I use both, but I don't always order them from SL.

We never used ETC. But if you would like her to have some activities that she can do independently, this might work for you. AAS is all about the parents involvement. It did not fit my teaching style. I couldn't keep it organized.

My dd enjoys workbooks. We read together. She reads aloud. And she works on her workbooks. At that age she needed encouragement and lots of help to get started, but then she would sing the answers to me as she finished them.

We did use Calvert and it was crazy!!! Back and forth, this workbook and that... we didn't last 3 months with it! The books were great, but the schedule was way too much for us to follow. We will use some of the books, but in our own way.

Homeschooling is quite exciting. So many curriculums and methods to try. Of course it is quite a bit of trial and error. I hope you enjoy your first year!

#34 kolamum

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Posted 04 August 2012 - 08:08 AM

:grouphug:

What core are you using? HSITW Time Traveler CDs hook up really well & plan in VERY easily for hands on stuff with Cores D & E. BUT, if you want stuff LIKE SL with hands on stuff, try Winters Promise. :)

#35 woolybear

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Posted 04 August 2012 - 08:38 AM

Advice from someone who has used Sonlight since 1996-ish? ----

Dump the CD. Use the IG for open and go. Instead of worksheets, use the timeline or make a notebook. Day 1 of SL, page 1 of notebook. What did your child learn about? They or you write the title. Write a sentence or make a list. Use Google images and find a picture. Done with day 1.

When you finish reading a book, go to Amazon and click copy the picture of the book (or you can probably do that on google images). Put the picture in your notebook. Copy the title, maybe the author. If you or your kid is into it, copy a favorite line from the book. Design a star system for how well they liked it. Use sticker stars if you want -- 1, 2 or 3. Liked, so-so, or not liked.

Simple. Keep it simple. Worksheets are over-rated. Websites are over-rated. Read the books, write a little something (emphasize little). Make a memory. If you do anything related to what you're studying (Lego pyramid, teddy bear shaped snack, whatever) -- take a picture. Add to your notebook.

Dump the CD. Keep it simple. Make a notebook. Your child will like this better than the prettiest worksheet. Remember, worksheets are highly over-rated. :D


Thank you for this. I am printing it out and using it as a guide/reminder to keep it simple. I appreciate the way you've laid it out for us folks who can tend to overthink/overplan/overdo.

#36 Tidbits of Learning

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Posted 04 August 2012 - 08:56 AM

I would suggest The Reading Lesson if your child went to public school kindergarten (a la sight words) and needs to get some quick phonics knowledge while still feeling good about the sight words they do know.
It is one book. You snuggle up on the couch and read a few pages a day. It worked wonders with my ds9 after he had finished public school kindergarten.
http://www.readinglesson.com/


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