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#1 momofkhm

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Posted 31 January 2008 - 11:18 AM

Our first year homeschooling, the kids and I were all in Bible Study Fellowship. It was what I planned on for this year. Then dh said I couldn't lead anymore so we've been on the waiting list. No call yet. At this point, I don't expect one.

I'm thinking the rest of this year my oldest has enough Bible reading to do that she might rebel if I added a Bible study on top of it. Besides, we started so early, we only have 10 or 11 weeks of school left! (I need to count.)

So now I'm looking toward next year. We'll be using yr 2 of TOG if it matters. My kids will be 3rd, 6th, and 8th graders. I don't mind using something different for all three. But worksheet/book based would be easiest on me. The other thing that I want is something that if it works for us, I can keep using the same company until my youngest is finished.

One more thing, I may put whoever is old enough into Teen CBS next fall. I know the oldest one is, I'm not sure about the middle.

Thanks!

#2 Lisawa

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Posted 31 January 2008 - 11:38 AM

Have you looked into Explorers bible study yet? I love BSF and this is set up a lot like that. 5 shoert lessons a day, has comentary in the end of each lesson for the older kids and also includes map work and back ground after many lessons. I love it... but then I LOVE BSF!

I couldnt handle being out at night... then it was 4 or 5 nights a week, and I dont like the morning groups because it cuts into school and nothing for the older kids...

I hope you find what works...:)

Explorers Bible Studyhttp://www.explorerb.../homeschool.htm

PS... I think with your age group you might be able to study the same thing... different level though.

#3 Mom0012

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Posted 31 January 2008 - 01:07 PM

You mentioned teen CBS, so I thought I would share that our CBS group has elementary bible study classes for homeschoolers. If there isn't anything like this now at the group near you, I wonder if there are enough homeschoolers in your area that they would consider adding something like this.

My children attend their class when I attend mine and they do the same lesson that I do, but it's at their level. It has been good for us all.

Lisa

#4 siloam

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Posted 31 January 2008 - 01:12 PM

Kay Arthur's Bible Study 4 Kids series? We enjoy them here.

Heather


#5 Allen Academy

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Posted 31 January 2008 - 01:19 PM

We use the Bible Study Guide for All Ages and are really happy with it.

#6 Harriet Vane

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Posted 31 January 2008 - 05:41 PM

Short answer: The Explorer's Bible studies are my favorite. They are similar to BSF and CBS.

Below is an old post that I have copied and pasted that gives specific reviews of several Bible curriculums:

When I evaluate a Bible curriculum, I look for what percentage of questions require the student to answer from the Bible text itself (I shoot for 2/3--most studies unfortunately only hit 50% or less), how factual versus opinion-based any notes are and to what degree there is denominational bias.

I also look for how much a good inductive process is reflected in the study--there should be factual observations, an opportunity to summarize the main point of the passage in one concise statement, and finally, application to real life.

I also think that younger children do well with circling the right answer, puzzles, and drawing in response to the text. However, as your child reaches fourth and fifth grades, their Bible study should include more short answer and independent work. (SWB's SOTW reflects this same progression--SOTW 1 has a lot of coloring and multiple choice on tests, whereas SOTW 4 has more short answer and not so many coloring pages.)

I have not found one single Bible curriculum or study anywhere, ever, that asks for a one-sentence summary of the main point of the passage. I highly advocate adding this feature in to whatever Bible study you use or teach, in any setting. A good way to do this with kids is to ask a question like, "What did you learn about God in this passage?" or "What do you think is the very most important lesson in this passage?" Keep it to one short sentence--there may be many subpoints that are good to know, but it is very valuable to be able to distinguish the main, most important point.

My number one pick would have to be the Explorer's Bible study, which is available at www.explorerbiblestudy.org. Many thanks to Jessica at Trivium Academy for recommending it. I was impressed. It has a good amount of factual observation questions, is very Bible-text focused but still includes some cultural/geographical/historical notes here and there, and has a small proportion of application questions in each unit. Information is presented from an evangelical perspective but seems more factual than opinionated. For those who may be familiar with Bible Study Fellowship or Community Bible Study, this curriculum follows the same pattern. Each unit is also laid out into five days of homework--a decently challenging but not overwhelming amount. Another key feature of this curriculum is the fact that there are corresponding adult studies as well. For a logic stage student either their older elementary OR high school study would be appropriate depending upon reading fluency and maturity.

I also, by the way, recommend both BSF and CBS children's programs. I evaluated both. I think the CBS program has slightly more challenging homework, but also really like the way older children and teens are led to do homiletics at the BSF meetings. (Homiletics is a process of generating an outline of the passage with a final, summary statement.) I recommend either program without reservation in addition to the Explorer's curriculum.

I also have used and liked Kay Arthur's Bible study series for children. My own dd has used several books in this series successfully this year. However, I would steer away from *How to Study the Bible* as it is unnecessarily wordy and proved to be quite challenging for the 4th-5th grade girls I taught. The material is not hard--the presentation of it in this book was terribly convoluted, though. If you choose to do that book, take two weeks per unit and plan on really holding your child's hand through it. The other books in the series are much easier and quite doable, though--we have been satisfied with several others in the series. These books have five or seven days of homework per unit, include both factual questions and marking things directly in biblical text, and some application.

After that, I consider Rod and Staff to be a decent alternative. There is a solid amount of factual questions and some good information on history/geography/culture. However, there is virtually no application, and no summary statement opportunity (none of those I reviewed include this). And, even at the older grades there is virtually no short answer--format is still multiple choice and simpler responses. There is more denominational bias in the notes but can be overcome by careful Bible study. This curriculum would be acceptable even if it's not my favorite.

Christian Light was a lot like Rod and Staff but not quite as challenging. I also thought Christian Liberty was middle-range--not the greatest, but not terrible either.

I was really NOT impressed in the least with either Abeka or AlphaOmega and would not recommend those at all. They were simplistic, passive, lacked depth and do not require much from the student at any age.

One final thought--for high school I would gravitate towards the Explorer's adult series or towards NavPress study guides. I also think teens should be generating their own inductive notes (observation-interpretation statement--application) rather than passively responding to a Bible study guide.

There may well be other wonderful resources out there. This is just what I have reviewed. I'd be happy to answer any further questions.

#7 Zee

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Posted 31 January 2008 - 06:07 PM

This is what we use, also. (Precepts for kids) We have done at least 4 of these and have plans to do more. We will be doing them along with TOG 2 next year. My son is in 5th this year. I'm thinking we'll do either the Revelation series or Daniel, but hopefully both. We are on our last book of the John series and it has been wonderful. I love going through the entire book, line by line, with ds. I get a book for me and we do this together. He could do it on his own, but we like to discuss things as we go. I am thinking that I may move him into regular precept studies in 7th. Not totally sure on that.

#8 siloam

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Posted 31 January 2008 - 06:40 PM

Ok what is CBS? :D I did try the Abbreviation list and other searches, but either it isn't there or I am blind.

Heather


#9 siloam

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Posted 31 January 2008 - 07:01 PM

Ok next question between EBS and BSG. It appears to me that BSG covers the whole bible, and that EBS leaves out the minor prophets (a pet peeve of mine). At lest it seems to until the adult study, which I supposed a High schooler could use. Is that right?

Of course on the other hand I prefer the straight through the Bible approach of EBS, nor do I really like the cartoonist characters of BSG...but my kids might. Lucky for me I don't need to make a decision for a while.

Heather


#10 Harriet Vane

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Posted 31 January 2008 - 07:13 PM

CBS stands for Community Bible Study. It was originally an off-shoot of BSF (Bible Study Fellowship). I have been involved with both organizations. The homework for both is *excellent* and there is virtually no difference in quality between the two (on the homework). CBS is much more relaxed than BSF as far as rules go--there are things I wish BSF would lighten up about, but there are also things I think CBS could tighten up. :-D

The Explorer's Bible study is also an off-shoot of BSF, believe it or not. There were rural families who were having a very difficult time getting to BSF due to distance, and as a result that particular BSF class was having a hard time maintaining enough active members to stay open. The writer of the Explorer's series wanted to provide a resource similar to BSF but that families could do independently at home, or facilitate in small groups.

Therefore--in many ways BSF, CBS, and Explorer's are interchangeable. The one thing BSF and CBS offer is the lecture/teaching. As far as the homework and the notes go, though, they are all roughly equivalent.

#11 siloam

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Posted 31 January 2008 - 07:30 PM

CBS stands for Community Bible Study. It was originally an off-shoot of BSF (Bible Study Fellowship). I have been involved with both organizations. The homework for both is *excellent* and there is virtually no difference in quality between the two (on the homework). CBS is much more relaxed than BSF as far as rules go--there are things I wish BSF would lighten up about, but there are also things I think CBS could tighten up. :-D

The Explorer's Bible study is also an off-shoot of BSF, believe it or not. There were rural families who were having a very difficult time getting to BSF due to distance, and as a result that particular BSF class was having a hard time maintaining enough active members to stay open. The writer of the Explorer's series wanted to provide a resource similar to BSF but that families could do independently at home, or facilitate in small groups.

Therefore--in many ways BSF, CBS, and Explorer's are interchangeable. The one thing BSF and CBS offer is the lecture/teaching. As far as the homework and the notes go, though, they are all roughly equivalent.


Thank you!

At this stage I want something to do at home, but I think one can still use BSG, can't you? Looks like it is all there to purchase. I kind of like that is has the one manual for all ages.

I was planning on using the Kay Arthur books, but again I get frusterated because they don't make a complete study at all. I was beginning to think I might have to put something together myself, but would rather not if I don't have to.

Off to ponder some more....

Heather


#12 Alana in Canada

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Posted 31 January 2008 - 08:32 PM

Could anyone chime in on Christian Studies series by Memoria Press?

I have it, it was horribly expensive, and I am having trouble with teaching it. (The first lesson did NOT go well.)

The kids loved their Bible study last year when we did VOS with activity sheets from Calvary Chapel, but I wanted something more "studious." I may have gone too far with CS, though!
My kids are 10 and 7.

Thanks!

#13 Debra in CO

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Posted 31 January 2008 - 08:58 PM

Alana - We've loved Christian Studies by Memoria Press. I've only got my oldest doing it right now though. I'm planning to start my 3rd grader in it sometime... when I get around to it...

Are you trying to do it with both kids? I don't think it is a great fit for most 7 year olds. I know it wouldn't fly with *my* 7 year old anyway.

It took us probably 3-4 lessons before we really got into any kind of rhythm with the program though. I guess I wouldn't give up after just one.


To everyone else - loved the info. I'm trying to figure out a plan for my kids that actually works for me. I go back and forth so often on some of this. I need something that I can actually do. EBS might be worth looking into. Again.

Debra
Mom of five, ages 1-10

#14 Alana in Canada

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Posted 01 February 2008 - 12:25 AM

Thank you Debra. I brought her into it by default: I just don't have anything for her at the moment and the idea of doing something "separate" is about to drive me crazy.

I'll give it a few more lessons, but I was wondering if we should bail, now, before I (a) got another student workbook just for her (the 7 year old) and (B) mark up the one we already have.

#15 Alana in Canada

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Posted 01 February 2008 - 02:20 AM

I've been looking at my downloads from the Explorer's Bible Study site (lessons are free from the "study with us" tab, but you have to be vigilant about downloading the excercises each week) and I can't figure out when and where one is supposed to read the Bible. I'm looking at the materials called "Beginnings II" and the first lesson doesn't seem to have anything, the second has references like "from Genesis 6-9," there's one that even lists "Genesis 12, 15, 18, 21." Each of these references applies to ONE day of study. I really don't think they intend a seven year old to read all that.

So, when does one read the actual Bible?

Thanks.

#16 Harriet Vane

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Posted 01 February 2008 - 08:56 AM

I took just a quick look at the Explorer's site to refresh my memory. I will have to dig out my own curriculum sample, but if memory serves, the Beginnings books are more for young pre-readers and new readers. Those books are expected to be parent-guided.

The next one up, Discovery, includes the Bible text right in the book. It's very clear--it's in a box on the page, with questions following. A young friend of mine is doing this level and likes it.

Personally, I find that many kids, once reading, can work about one level higher than what is recommended by Explorer's. The group of 5th/6th graders that I teach are all comfortably doing Quest, the jr. high/high school level book.

I'd say give the Discovery level lessons a try and see if you are better pleased with them.

I will try to find my own curriculum sample (I wish they had it right on the site!!!) and double-check. If you don't hear back from me today you can safely assume that what I have said here is accurate. (The only part I am unsure on is my memory of Beginnings--I am personally familiar with both Discovery and Quest.)

#17 Alana in Canada

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Posted 03 February 2008 - 01:42 AM

I think you have solved my problem for me. I have Discovery as well as Beginnings2 and Quest on hand, (to about lesson 8) so don't worry about finding your sample.

I'll try it out next week. Oh what a relief it would be to have them do their Bible Study together!

#18 BizyPenguin

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Posted 05 February 2008 - 03:06 AM

Have you seen the Bible devotional notebooking pages at HoldThatThought.com? I'm waiting for mine to arrive in the mail and they look great! We'll use those and the Bible for religious studies.

#19 siloam

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Posted 05 February 2008 - 12:18 PM

Have you seen the Bible devotional notebooking pages at HoldThatThought.com? I'm waiting for mine to arrive in the mail and they look great! We'll use those and the Bible for religious studies.


Yes, I have both advanced CDs, and love them. The only thing I could wish for NOW was that most of the pictures were half a page (some are, most aren't) given my dd only writes a few lines right now. I suppose that will change in time...or I hope it does.:eek:

I also have the advanced History CD, and it is a good resource, but isn't near to being detailed enough to fit our needs, unlike the Bible CD. It is also mostly American history. I hope they expand that CD down the road...though I haven't found anything better yet, so I make a lot of my own sheets by Googling images and putting them on a blank sheet.:cool:

Blessings,

Heather



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