Jump to content

What's with the ads?


Photo

Science that is like SOTW??


  • Please log in to reply
39 replies to this topic

What's with the ads?

#1 Jenny in GA

Jenny in GA

    Hive Mind Queen Bee

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 1017 posts

Posted 15 October 2011 - 07:23 AM

We love love SOTW around here. I love the format, and the kids beg for it and wish we could do a couple chapters every day. It just. Works!

I am having the hardest time choosing a science curriculum (which I may start another thread about) and realized that if I could find one closest to the SOTW format, it would be a better chance of being a good fit.

What do I like about SOTW? Each chapter is: Read the selection (which is interesting), answer the questions afterward, have a few activities to choose from which go along with the topic, have a few library books listed which cover the topic. Next chapter follows logically and follows the same format.

Is there anything like that in the science world??

#2 54879525

54879525

    Beekeeping Professor

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 55102 posts

Posted 15 October 2011 - 07:47 AM

NOEO is somewhat like it. There are no questions though. It's just read the pages in the book(s) and/or do the experiment/activity. There are sheets for either drawing what you learned about or writing a narration (or whatever else). We just discuss the material after we read it and sometimes my kids draw a picture.

http://www.noeoscience.com/

#3 Crimson Wife

Crimson Wife

    Qualified Bee Keeper

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 14147 posts

Posted 15 October 2011 - 07:54 AM

Mr. Q is similar, though it doesn't have a list of book suggestions. I just go to our local library and choose books & DVD's that look interesting. The Life Science is free to download.

#4 54879525

54879525

    Beekeeping Professor

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 55102 posts

Posted 15 October 2011 - 07:57 AM

Mr. Q is similar, though it doesn't have a list of book suggestions. I just go to our local library and choose books & DVD's that look interesting. The Life Science is free to download.


That looks great. The author says the books are for all ages. Do you think that's true?

#5 nikkid

nikkid

    Hive Mind Level 5 Worker: Forager Bee

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 375 posts

Posted 15 October 2011 - 08:07 AM

Mr. Q's Classic Science Curriculum is like that. eequalsmcq.com
Very simple to use. Worksheets built into the chapters. You download a textbook for the student and one for the parent, but you wouldn't have to print every page. We have a laser printer so it's cheap to print, but I know others who read the text in color on the computer and then just print out the worksheets or the simple experiments to save money.

The first year (Life Science-for ages 6-9) is free so you can see if you like his curriculum. Each year after that is $50 total for both books, or you can just buy units for $15 each. (He has a holiday sale in January for 50% off everything, too.)
The experiments so far for us have been really easy to use, no strange materials required.
It's the easiest science for us to implement that was engaging yet challenging. (Don't know what ages your kids are--my dd8 is in 3rd grade.)
There is a referral discount if you feel like referring me, but regardless, I would honestly be recommending it anyway.

ETA: Just saw other posts. It says Life Science is for ages 6-9, but a 6 or 7 year old couldn't do this independently. An 8-9 year old might be able to depending on maturity level. There are big vocabulary words that kids might need help with. I have my dd8 read the text outloud to me, sometimes I read to her, then she does the worksheets by herself. So far the experiments we're done were great for all ages.

Happy science-ing!
Nikki Douglas

Edited by nmbdoug, 15 October 2011 - 08:09 AM.


#6 EKS

EKS

    Qualified Bee Keeper

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 10604 posts

Posted 15 October 2011 - 08:20 AM

I've been thinking about creating something like this (to sell, I mean). But I haven't ever seen anything that brings all of those elements together.

#7 54879525

54879525

    Beekeeping Professor

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 55102 posts

Posted 15 October 2011 - 08:21 AM

I've been thinking about creating something like this (to sell, I mean). But I haven't ever seen anything that brings all of those elements together.


Well hurry up then. I want to buy it. :D

#8 Crimson Wife

Crimson Wife

    Qualified Bee Keeper

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 14147 posts

Posted 15 October 2011 - 08:51 AM

The author of Mr. Q does a fantastic job making some relatively advanced material accessible to young students. My bright almost-6 y.o. has had no trouble following along, though I only have my older student do the worksheets.

#9 Five More Minutes

Five More Minutes

    Guardian of the Chocolate Stash

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 1308 posts

Posted 15 October 2011 - 09:14 AM

I've been thinking about creating something like this (to sell, I mean). But I haven't ever seen anything that brings all of those elements together.


Please hurry! I'm waiting ... :toetap05:

In all seriousness, though, I haven't seen a science program like SOTW, and lamented its absence in this recent threat.

What I am doing for now is meshing BFSU I (which, to my mind, provides an excellent framework for learning science and designs lessons revolving around demonstrations and 'experiments') and the RS4K Pre-Level student texts (which is are readable texts for young learners). I'm only 2 weeks into this after overhauling my science plans for the year, but so far, so good.

#10 Zuzu822

Zuzu822

    Hive Mind Level 5 Worker: Forager Bee

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 558 posts

Posted 15 October 2011 - 09:32 AM

Would Elemental Science fit the bill? I confess I've never seen it other than the Intro level, but I know it's supposed to fit well with the classical model.

#11 Julie Smith

Julie Smith

    Amateur Bee Keeper

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 7324 posts

Posted 15 October 2011 - 09:59 AM

Thanks to my dh, we have a nice audio recording of Mr. q life science. We also have permission to share it.

#12 mommymilkies

mommymilkies

    Empress Bee

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 7653 posts

Posted 15 October 2011 - 10:29 AM

Julie, can you share it with me? Do you have a link or maybe you could email me? :)

#13 Julie Smith

Julie Smith

    Amateur Bee Keeper

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 7324 posts

Posted 15 October 2011 - 10:51 AM

Julie, can you share it with me? Do you have a link or maybe you could email me? :)


For people who want it please PM me with your email address. I'll send you a email with attachments.

#14 sncstraub

sncstraub

    Hive Mind Level 2 Worker: Nurse Bee

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 153 posts

Posted 15 October 2011 - 12:55 PM

Thanks so much for the link to Mr. Q's science curriculum!!

We have been using Apologia last year and this year, and I am just done with it. Astronomy was not so bad last year; we enjoyed that for the most part. But Botany is killing me. And the boys aren't retaining anything either.

So I've been looking for something else to try. I just ordered the books that are recommended for Elemental Science (some for earth science and some for life science) and was just going to use those, working it out on my own.

But I think they'll go along fabulously with Mr. Q's stuff! I think we'll give the free Life Science a go first and then maybe move into some of the Earth Science that we haven't covered.

Thank you! Thank you! Thank you!!!

#15 Heidi @ Mt Hope

Heidi @ Mt Hope

    Hive Mind Queen Bee

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 1957 posts

Posted 15 October 2011 - 12:57 PM

We love love SOTW around here. I love the format, and the kids beg for it and wish we could do a couple chapters every day. It just. Works!

I am having the hardest time choosing a science curriculum (which I may start another thread about) and realized that if I could find one closest to the SOTW format, it would be a better chance of being a good fit.

What do I like about SOTW? Each chapter is: Read the selection (which is interesting), answer the questions afterward, have a few activities to choose from which go along with the topic, have a few library books listed which cover the topic. Next chapter follows logically and follows the same format.

Is there anything like that in the science world??


Are you looking for secular? If so, the Christian Kids Explore Science series obviously wouldn't work, but I've found it to be great for us. It is reasonably priced, and is like having the narrative science and activity guide all in one. I reviewed it a little on my blog, but I basically use it the same as I use SOTW. Read a lesson and do the review questions one day. Use the definitions if I need extra material for copywork. Pick and choose activities to complete on a second day (or not :tongue_smilie:). Find books and DVDs from our own collection or at the library (or find videos on YouTube) that pertain to the week's subject.

#16 Farrar

Farrar

    Expert Cat Herder

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 13200 posts

Posted 15 October 2011 - 02:15 PM

I personally didn't think Mr. Q was all that similar to SOTW. To me the hallmark of SOTW is a well-written central text that gives detail but in a way young children can understand. The AG organizes different types of supplemental resources and activities to go along with it. I've seen some science curricula that have the same format - a text and a set of activities. However, none of them have that well-written, worth re-reading sort of central text like SOTW. It's always especially driven home to me when I see older books about science. I had a blog post about finding an older book for geology, which we're doing this year and how SAD I am that it's so out of date that it's largely unusable because the writing is so very good.

#17 Five More Minutes

Five More Minutes

    Guardian of the Chocolate Stash

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 1308 posts

Posted 15 October 2011 - 05:02 PM

To me the hallmark of SOTW is a well-written central text that gives detail but in a way young children can understand. The AG organizes different types of supplemental resources and activities to go along with it. I've seen some science curricula that have the same format - a text and a set of activities. However, none of them have that well-written, worth re-reading sort of central text like SOTW.

Well-said. I agree completely.

#18 JenC3

JenC3

    Hive Mind Queen Bee

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 1098 posts

Posted 15 October 2011 - 06:02 PM

I personally didn't think Mr. Q was all that similar to SOTW. To me the hallmark of SOTW is a well-written central text that gives detail but in a way young children can understand. The AG organizes different types of supplemental resources and activities to go along with it. I've seen some science curricula that have the same format - a text and a set of activities. However, none of them have that well-written, worth re-reading sort of central text like SOTW. It's always especially driven home to me when I see older books about science. I had a blog post about finding an older book for geology, which we're doing this year and how SAD I am that it's so out of date that it's largely unusable because the writing is so very good.


Plus I want audio! We love, love having the audio. My dc beg to hear history and my dd is so into science I feel bad not doing well with it. Having history on audio allows us to have more reading time, car, etc.

#19 nikkid

nikkid

    Hive Mind Level 5 Worker: Forager Bee

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 375 posts

Posted 15 October 2011 - 10:00 PM

I personally didn't think Mr. Q was all that similar to SOTW. To me the hallmark of SOTW is a well-written central text that gives detail but in a way young children can understand. The AG organizes different types of supplemental resources and activities to go along with it. I've seen some science curricula that have the same format - a text and a set of activities. However, none of them have that well-written, worth re-reading sort of central text like SOTW. It's always especially driven home to me when I see older books about science. I had a blog post about finding an older book for geology, which we're doing this year and how SAD I am that it's so out of date that it's largely unusable because the writing is so very good.


You're right in that the text is not as well written. Of the curriculum I searched through that was written for kids to read and understand as is, though, I felt most had blatant assumptions in them that I didn't agree with or weren't supported or talked down to kids (text that felt like it was saying "this is just the way this part of science is and you can learn more about why when you're older since right now you won't be curious about why, you just want to sit still and hear what we have to say"...hope that's not offensive, just couldn't think of another way to describe it).

I felt like it was most like SOTW in that there is a text you read one chapter a week, with assigned questions for retention, followed by 1-2 days of activities later in the week. It can be cartoonish, but I found that kept my dd's interest more since I ask her to read the text out loud to me (whereas SOTW is me reading out loud to her). You're right, there is no supplemental list of books to learn more. But I find it easy to browse our library for DVDs or books that go along with. I've used lists people have shared on this forum too.

I too love the older style of writing for kids. I really love VM Hillyer's books, which are sadly out of date, but I love to read his analogies about geography and history. We have been reading Child's History of the World and Child's Geography of the World, and just got Child's History of Art at the library. Maybe someday there will be a better text we can compare for science, and I would love to use it, but for now I'll have to settle for this I think. :)

#20 Julie Smith

Julie Smith

    Amateur Bee Keeper

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 7324 posts

Posted 15 October 2011 - 10:24 PM

Plus I want audio! We love, love having the audio. My dc beg to hear history and my dd is so into science I feel bad not doing well with it. Having history on audio allows us to have more reading time, car, etc.


That's why I had my dh make Mr. Q into a audio recording. It also meant my boys could listen to the same chapter again and again.

....

And for those who emailed me asking for a copy of the audio recording give me a day or two to get it all organized. :)

#21 fairy4tmama

fairy4tmama

    Hive Mind Level 2 Worker: Nurse Bee

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 315 posts

Posted 18 October 2011 - 11:07 AM

So this thread has had me thinking and cruising Amazon (which is not good :tongue_smilie:since I had already placed several orders this month, one for a number of science readers). We already have the first book in Joy Hakims The Story of Science series which I bought last year when I wasn't hacking BSFU. I had hoped that we could use it like SOTW. We (DS 8 and I) really like it and are able to use it in the same style as SOTW but it is not quite as farrarwilliams succinctly described

Originally Posted by farrarwilliams Posted Image
To me the hallmark of SOTW is a well-written central text that gives detail but in a way young children can understand. The AG organizes different types of supplemental resources and activities to go along with it. I've seen some science curricula that have the same format - a text and a set of activities. However, none of them have that well-written, worth re-reading sort of central text like SOTW.

We have currently set it aside because it feels more like a great go along to SOTW and we are detouring to do a term of Early American History. For context- we are revisiting BFSU and what seemed awkward and stressful last year is working beautifully this year. However, I still long for a SOTW science book. So as I was browsing amazon :glare: I came across the series Everyday Science Mysteries: Stories for Inquiry-Based Science Teaching and was able to download a sample story from each book at the NSTA website. I am pretty excited about these and plan to try out two of the stories with upcoming BFSU Lessons I have planned. Perhaps this may fit the bill for some of you. While I don't see dropping BFSU for this at our house I can see using it in tandem. Having read through all the samples I think that one could use it as a spine (of course ymmv). Just had to share!

#22 Mama2two

Mama2two

    Hive Mind Royal Larvae

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 1039 posts

Posted 24 October 2011 - 09:15 PM

That's why I had my dh make Mr. Q into a audio recording. It also meant my boys could listen to the same chapter again and again.

....

And for those who emailed me asking for a copy of the audio recording give me a day or two to get it all organized. :)


Julie,
we received the recording from you, thank you so much!

#23 ChandlerMom

ChandlerMom

    Hive Mind Queen Bee

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 875 posts

Posted 24 October 2011 - 10:27 PM

So this thread has had me thinking and cruising Amazon (which is not good :tongue_smilie:since I had already placed several orders this month, one for a number of science readers). We already have the first book in Joy Hakims The Story of Science series which I bought last year when I wasn't hacking BSFU. I had hoped that we could use it like SOTW. We (DS 8 and I) really like it and are able to use it in the same style as SOTW but it is not quite as farrarwilliams succinctly described
We have currently set it aside because it feels more like a great go along to SOTW and we are detouring to do a term of Early American History. For context- we are revisiting BFSU and what seemed awkward and stressful last year is working beautifully this year. However, I still long for a SOTW science book. So as I was browsing amazon :glare: I came across the series Everyday Science Mysteries: Stories for Inquiry-Based Science Teaching and was able to download a sample story from each book at the NSTA website. I am pretty excited about these and plan to try out two of the stories with upcoming BFSU Lessons I have planned. Perhaps this may fit the bill for some of you. While I don't see dropping BFSU for this at our house I can see using it in tandem. Having read through all the samples I think that one could use it as a spine (of course ymmv). Just had to share!


As to Hakim's series, the 3 books are published by Smithsonian and there are companion lab books and student pages developed by John Hopkins Univ talent development program -- some pretty high credentials. You can also get them from the publisher for half-price and free shipping. You can search the forum for details on that. :D

#24 LMD

LMD

    Hive Mind Queen Bee

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 1525 posts

Posted 24 October 2011 - 10:34 PM

So this thread has had me thinking and cruising Amazon (which is not good :tongue_smilie:since I had already placed several orders this month, one for a number of science readers). We already have the first book in Joy Hakims The Story of Science series which I bought last year when I wasn't hacking BSFU. I had hoped that we could use it like SOTW. We (DS 8 and I) really like it and are able to use it in the same style as SOTW but it is not quite as farrarwilliams succinctly described
We have currently set it aside because it feels more like a great go along to SOTW and we are detouring to do a term of Early American History. For context- we are revisiting BFSU and what seemed awkward and stressful last year is working beautifully this year. However, I still long for a SOTW science book. So as I was browsing amazon :glare: I came across the series Everyday Science Mysteries: Stories for Inquiry-Based Science Teaching and was able to download a sample story from each book at the NSTA website. I am pretty excited about these and plan to try out two of the stories with upcoming BFSU Lessons I have planned. Perhaps this may fit the bill for some of you. While I don't see dropping BFSU for this at our house I can see using it in tandem. Having read through all the samples I think that one could use it as a spine (of course ymmv). Just had to share!


Thanks, this looks good!

What about living books? I've heard good things about 'the storybook of science' by Fabre - haven't used it myself though...

#25 MusicMama

MusicMama

    Hive Mind Level 5 Worker: Forager Bee

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 591 posts

Posted 25 October 2011 - 08:31 AM

Nobody has mentioned RSO. That is what I am considering for my DD next year, because it seemed to follow the SOTW format, as well as cycle. Is this not the case?

#26 Farrar

Farrar

    Expert Cat Herder

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 13200 posts

Posted 25 October 2011 - 09:16 AM

Correct me if I'm wrong, but I seem to recall that RSO has a single volume that has all kinds of things - readings, worksheets, activities, etc. A lot of people really love it, but I'm pretty sure it lacks that single, well-written spine thing.

(Also, I've said it before, but I'll say it again: I can't take seriously curricula written in comic sans...)

#27 jplain

jplain

    Hive Mind Queen Bee

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 2005 posts

Posted 25 October 2011 - 09:31 AM

You can also get [Hakim's science books] from the publisher for half-price and free shipping.


Link

The totals don't quite match up with the info in the thread linked above, but I imagine that's because the price of the books has increased since it was originally posted.
I'm getting a total of $101.35 for the 3 books, 2 teacher guides, and 2 student guides.

Edited by jplain, 25 October 2011 - 09:34 AM.


#28 KathyBC

KathyBC

    Hive Mind Queen Bee

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 1535 posts

Posted 25 October 2011 - 09:52 AM

Nobody has mentioned RSO. That is what I am considering for my DD next year, because it seemed to follow the SOTW format, as well as cycle. Is this not the case?


RSO has Life, Earth & Space, and Chemistry but so far lacks Physics.


ETA: The comic sans font seems appealing and appropriate in a worktext designed for primary kids. But then... I actually like this friendly little font.

Edited by KathyBC, 25 October 2011 - 10:37 AM.


#29 Five More Minutes

Five More Minutes

    Guardian of the Chocolate Stash

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 1308 posts

Posted 25 October 2011 - 10:21 AM

(Also, I've said it before, but I'll say it again: I can't take seriously curricula written in comic sans...)


:lol: It's nice to know I'm not alone in this. I enjoy the RS4K Pre-Level student books as snuggle-up-and-read read spines for my young girls, but the Comic Sans font nearly kills me ...

#30 JadeOrchidSong

JadeOrchidSong

    Hive Mind Queen Bee

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 2542 posts

Posted 25 October 2011 - 12:32 PM

Mr. Q is similar, though it doesn't have a list of book suggestions. I just go to our local library and choose books & DVD's that look interesting. The Life Science is free to download.

Thanks! I am checking it out now.

#31 Dahliarw

Dahliarw

    Hive Mind Worker Bee

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 803 posts

Posted 27 October 2011 - 02:22 AM

I just found this thread searching because apologia is just not working as well as I hoped. Ds LOVES SOTW, not so much science (we're doing astronomy, which he loves as a topic, just not as much in that book).

Which curriculums are either creation based or "neutral" in that they don't promote or even discuss either creation or evolution? I know real science 4 kids claims to be neutral, but am not sure on the others (other than the ones labeled "Christian" obviously).

And I agree with the pp, there needs to be a good strong science spine... SWB needs to get her degree in science. ;)

#32 mamaofblessings

mamaofblessings

    Hive Mind Queen Bee

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 2253 posts

Posted 27 October 2011 - 08:21 AM

I'd LOVE a science that flowed like SOTW does in our home.

We are science folks. We love it! We were doing Considering God's Creation last year because the year before Apologia BOMBED...BLEH!!

We're now ENJOYING Elemental Science: Biology. The only complaint I have with this particular curriculum is without the supplemental books you have NOTHING! I didn't realize this when I bought it. The curriculum is only a schedule and notebooking pages really. Without all the supplemental books you'd go NOWHERE with this science. Thankfully we got the books and LOVE it when it's all put together. I wish we didn't HAVE to purchase all those extra books to make this Science work so nicely like it does. Does that make sense? We're going to do Elemental Science: Chemistry next year and I have to purchase 5 books before we can even begin the curriculum. The experiments are great! BUT you have to have the books that each experiement is in otherwise you don't know what you're doing. I wish this was more of an open and go with ONE book...instead of 5 books just for it to flow well!

Don't get me wrong this is a great science but I wish I would've realized it's not a SPINE. If I would've known this I wouldn't have purchased Elemental Science: Biology, Elemental Science: Earth Science & Astronomy & Elemental Science: Chemistry.

I would've looked elsewhere. After purchasing the PDF of the science for this year....and all the supplemental books just for this year I ended spending alone on Science $96.50 and that doesn't count the cost of 2 binders I needed for the kids to put all the printed pages in....that doesn't include paper or ink costs to print all the pages either. AND doesn't include supplies needed for the experiements either...WAY more than I initially wanted to spend on Science. It's fun! We love it! But if I would've known what I know now we would've went with something else because of the cost.

Edited by mamaofblessings, 27 October 2011 - 08:26 AM.


#33 QueenieReighn

QueenieReighn

    Hive Mind Worker Bee

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 114 posts

Posted 27 October 2011 - 08:46 AM

Wow...I'm surprised people here didn't really like Apologia. In my home, it works just like SOTW. We read the chapter, answer the what do you remember questions, read some of the listed books in the journal, and do the simple activities. It's fun, simple, and understandable for everyone. Open and go. Guess it all depends on the kids/family. :-) Good luck finding your perfect fit!

#34 mamaofblessings

mamaofblessings

    Hive Mind Queen Bee

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 2253 posts

Posted 27 October 2011 - 09:33 AM

Wow...I'm surprised people here didn't really like Apologia. In my home, it works just like SOTW. We read the chapter, answer the what do you remember questions, read some of the listed books in the journal, and do the simple activities. It's fun, simple, and understandable for everyone. Open and go. Guess it all depends on the kids/family. :-) Good luck finding your perfect fit!


For our home it was the depth they went into. It was too far deep for my littles. And really they go so far into each planet that the enjoyment of learning about the planet in particular was a bit overwhelming in our home. SOTW is just enough information and "story-telling" that my kids are left with WANTING more. Apologia is very "read-y" and wasn't story-telling. We split up SOTW chapters like suggested in a 2 day week schedule. We don't spend 25 minutes just reading from the chapter like we did in Apolgia.

#35 Farrar

Farrar

    Expert Cat Herder

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 13200 posts

Posted 27 October 2011 - 10:07 AM

Which curriculums are either creation based or "neutral" in that they don't promote or even discuss either creation or evolution? I know real science 4 kids claims to be neutral, but am not sure on the others (other than the ones labeled "Christian" obviously).

And I agree with the pp, there needs to be a good strong science spine... SWB needs to get her degree in science. ;)


Most of the programs mentioned thus far are secular or make an attempt to be neutral by not including almost anything that will offend either side. RSO, Mr. Q, Elemental Science and RS4K are all in those categories.

Wow...I'm surprised people here didn't really like Apologia. In my home, it works just like SOTW. We read the chapter, answer the what do you remember questions, read some of the listed books in the journal, and do the simple activities. It's fun, simple, and understandable for everyone. Open and go. Guess it all depends on the kids/family. :-) Good luck finding your perfect fit!


But Apologia is one that is YEC Christian, so some of us would have no interest in even considering it. :001_smile:

#36 Dahliarw

Dahliarw

    Hive Mind Worker Bee

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 803 posts

Posted 27 October 2011 - 12:01 PM

For us Apologia is just too heavy and information loaded for ds. By the time we get to the end of a chapter he doesn't remember the beginning. We don't have that problem with SOTW, he can still tell me about the beginnning of volume one! I think we just need something that is a bit more simple at this point. He can get more in depth information when subjects are revisited.

I have a handful of programs to look into, thanks to these forums! Hopefully something will fit.

Ds is nearly 7, btw.

#37 eewaggie99

eewaggie99

    Hive Mind Level 2 Worker: Nurse Bee

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 154 posts

Posted 27 October 2011 - 01:37 PM

Correct me if I'm wrong, but I seem to recall that RSO has a single volume that has all kinds of things - readings, worksheets, activities, etc. A lot of people really love it, but I'm pretty sure it lacks that single, well-written spine thing.

(Also, I've said it before, but I'll say it again: I can't take seriously curricula written in comic sans...)

:iagree:
We are using RSO and it drives me BONKERS! I do like the stories and lab sheets. But I'm tempted to write the publisher and ask them to please reformat the books. But then, I'm a bit OCD when it comes to fonts and presentations. Don't get me started on people who love to explore the world of fonts in their PowerPoint presentations. I get really worked up.

My office had an assistant who wrote everything in comic sans. Every email seemed to scream, "I am unprofessional!"

#38 Dahliarw

Dahliarw

    Hive Mind Worker Bee

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 803 posts

Posted 27 October 2011 - 01:48 PM

I bet that would drive me bonkers with RSO as well. I hadn't gotten to look at the samples there yet.

I really wish I could just have one of each book sitting her to flip through. I guess I could do that to a degree, but then I have to pay return shipping!

#39 caedmyn

caedmyn

    Hive Mind Level 6 Worker: Scout Bee

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 436 posts

Posted 27 October 2011 - 05:55 PM

I just found this thread searching because apologia is just not working as well as I hoped. Ds LOVES SOTW, not so much science (we're doing astronomy, which he loves as a topic, just not as much in that book).

Which curriculums are either creation based or "neutral" in that they don't promote or even discuss either creation or evolution? I know real science 4 kids claims to be neutral, but am not sure on the others (other than the ones labeled "Christian" obviously).

And I agree with the pp, there needs to be a good strong science spine... SWB needs to get her degree in science. ;)


God's Design for Science is creation based...I believe it's YE creation since it's sold by Answers in Genesis but I'm not 100% sure of that. As far as I can tell, you can use the books as spines (alone if you're short on time, or add the suggested books if you have more time) and it looks like each lesson has an activity or experiment to go with it. I think it'd be more of a light science used alone.

#40 Jay3fer

Jay3fer

    Hive Mind Queen Bee

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 1069 posts

Posted 27 October 2011 - 07:02 PM

Would Elemental Science fit the bill? I confess I've never seen it other than the Intro level, but I know it's supposed to fit well with the classical model.


Nope. It "fits" in that it follows the 4-year progression outlined in WTM: life science, earth science, whatever, whatever. (don't want to go pull out the book at the moment)

I bought ES and despite my enthusiasm it was NOT a good fit - so much so that we didn't really start. It's a hodge podge of books that aren't really good; nothing exactly like a spine that you sit and read cover to cover.

I ended up buying Apologia Zoology 1 (flying creatures) and it's definitely the KIND of thing I want: it's well-written, enthusiastic about its subject, and I don't mind a "God" perspective. I do edit it a bit as I read because we're Jewish and I find the YE perspective a bit strained.

For my older kids, I just bought the Joy Hakim books because I'm enjoying the Story of US so much (and can't really use it much, because we're Canadian). I'd recommend secondhand - I got all 3 for $30-something, including shipping to Canada. You could try BetterWorldBooks, which also gives back to charity, or just bn.com if they don't have them.

(dd15 isn't homeschooled, but she IS an avid reader who will grab anything I leave on the shelf outside the bathroom. It's my way of "secretly" schooling her, and she has learned a ton of ancient history that way. :-))) )


What's with the ads?