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Brown rice and oats on the Candida diet?


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#1 Quiver0f10

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Posted 03 July 2011 - 07:18 PM

Some sites say yes. Some sites say no. I have no idea which side to believe. I am thinking my sinus issues might be Candida related so I want to try the diet and see if that helps, along with the advice I received in the other thread.

#2 teachmejoy

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Posted 03 July 2011 - 07:33 PM

I have Candida and thought I could get by just getting rid of sugar and yeast from my diet and get on Threelac probiotics. It was keeping it at bay, but I would still have episodes. I had to go on the complete diet, which is super hard!!! The one I follow says you can have brown and wild rice, but not oats.

I didn't know there was another thread out there! I'll have to find it. I was thinking about starting one.

#3 Quiver0f10

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Posted 03 July 2011 - 07:38 PM

I have Candida and thought I could get by just getting rid of sugar and yeast from my diet and get on Threelac probiotics. It was keeping it at bay, but I would still have episodes. I had to go on the complete diet, which is super hard!!! The one I follow says you can have brown and wild rice, but not oats.

I didn't know there was another thread out there! I'll have to find it. I was thinking about starting one.


Thanks. I ordered the Yeast Connection book and cookbook from my library so that should give me some help too. I did this years ago but don't remember much.

The other thread was @ my sinus problems and not candida, sorry for the confusion.

#4 Harriet Vane

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Posted 03 July 2011 - 09:01 PM

When I did this diet I stuck to pure wild rice or quinoa for grains--no brown rice or oatmeal at all.

#5 lwilliams1922

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Posted 03 July 2011 - 09:07 PM

I vote no to both.

have you heard of Bee's site/program? It's strict but will do the job.

Edited by lwilliams1922, 03 July 2011 - 09:22 PM.


#6 Omma

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Posted 03 July 2011 - 09:08 PM

BTW, there is a product called Flora Sinus from NutriHealth which I have found to really help me with potential candida issues related to my sinuses. It is like a probiotic just for the sinuses and I have been able to mostly avoid antibiotics and sinus infections since I started using it (I only take it when I have a definite sinus headache).

Brenda

#7 JudyJudyJudy

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Posted 03 July 2011 - 09:19 PM

I'm on the same diet because I'm actually allergic to yeast. I'm also allergic to oats, so that wasn't a question. However, I initially eliminated brown rice as well. I tried adding it back a couple of months later, but I reacted to it. I then took it out of my diet again and then tried it again about four months later. I'm now eating it without a problem. If I were you, I'd eliminate it in the beginning. After you've given your system months to clear out, I'd try adding it back if you miss it. Part of the reason I added it back was because I was losing too much weight.

#8 Peela

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Posted 03 July 2011 - 09:24 PM

There is also the Body Ecology diet which I have heard good things about- candida related.
Bodyecology.com

#9 Quiver0f10

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Posted 03 July 2011 - 09:46 PM

Thank you all. I will check out the mentioned sites.

#10 JudyJudyJudy

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Posted 03 July 2011 - 10:04 PM

Quiver, will you also be dairy-free and gluten-free?

#11 Quiver0f10

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Posted 03 July 2011 - 10:07 PM

Quiver, will you also be dairy-free and gluten-free?


I am avoiding all breads, pasta etc and am only eating a little bit of plain yogurt. The only grains I have been eating are the oats and brown rice but I will drop those too. I am not sure about gluten in other foods though. I am only eating whole unprocessed food so I should be able to avoid it, I think.

#12 JudyJudyJudy

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Posted 03 July 2011 - 10:37 PM

If you're eating only whole unprocessed foods, you aren't likely to be eating gluten unless you're eating sauces and marinades. When I was mostly dairy-free, I still ate plain whole yogurt and butter (only organic since other butter tends to have added ingredients that are related to yeast). I did fine eating that way. However, after I added back my hot chocolate (the only ingredients are 100% chocolate, honey, and milk), my seborrheic dermatitis flared up again, so I know that one or more of those ingredients are the trigger(s). I'm still consuming those three things, but I know I shouldn't be. The good thing about it, though, is that at least they don't make me feel bad like yeast itself (and even vinegar) does.

#13 mom4him

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Posted 03 July 2011 - 10:39 PM

Just information. Oats is gluten free but is most of the time processed in facilities that also process gluten grains. You can purchase gluten free oatmeal though. We can't use the regular but can use the gluten free. I use it very sparingly though, serving it maybe a couple of times a month.

#14 soror

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Posted 04 July 2011 - 03:25 AM

When I have done yeast diets in the past, NO, no grains. I don't really have yeast issues anymore, I do generally stay away from grains and sugar though and am gluten free though.

#15 Quiver0f10

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Posted 04 July 2011 - 07:48 AM

If you're eating only whole unprocessed foods, you aren't likely to be eating gluten unless you're eating sauces and marinades. When I was mostly dairy-free, I still ate plain whole yogurt and butter (only organic since other butter tends to have added ingredients that are related to yeast). I did fine eating that way. However, after I added back my hot chocolate (the only ingredients are 100% chocolate, honey, and milk), my seborrheic dermatitis flared up again, so I know that one or more of those ingredients are the trigger(s). I'm still consuming those three things, but I know I shouldn't be. The good thing about it, though, is that at least they don't make me feel bad like yeast itself (and even vinegar) does.


I do make my own sauces so I will double check on any ingredients. I am trying to figure out what I can eat lol. I have been following a vegetarian diet, but I am supposed to avoid beans for now too? I don't really mind chicken or fish, but I don't eat pork or beef so this should be interesting.

#16 Quiver0f10

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Posted 04 July 2011 - 07:49 AM

Just information. Oats is gluten free but is most of the time processed in facilities that also process gluten grains. You can purchase gluten free oatmeal though. We can't use the regular but can use the gluten free. I use it very sparingly though, serving it maybe a couple of times a month.


Good to know. Thanks. Once I add them back in I will buy some from the Health Food store.

#17 Quiver0f10

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Posted 04 July 2011 - 07:50 AM

When I have done yeast diets in the past, NO, no grains. I don't really have yeast issues anymore, I do generally stay away from grains and sugar though and am gluten free though.


Thanks!

#18 teachmejoy

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Posted 05 July 2011 - 01:03 PM

When I did this diet I stuck to pure wild rice or quinoa for grains--no brown rice or oatmeal at all.



I was just curious what the difference between the brown rice and the wild rice was. Also, where do you get wild rice or quinoa? I couldn't find any in my grocery store the other day!

The diet I was using said that a little of the wild rice or brown (quinoa was also on that list) was good to help with the fiber issues many have on this diet.

#19 JudyJudyJudy

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Posted 05 July 2011 - 03:03 PM

I do make my own sauces so I will double check on any ingredients. I am trying to figure out what I can eat lol. I have been following a vegetarian diet, but I am supposed to avoid beans for now too? I don't really mind chicken or fish, but I don't eat pork or beef so this should be interesting.

I've been yeast-free for over 2.5 years now. While I do eat pork, many yeast-free diet books recommend that you not. As for beans, I didn't eat them for over 2 years, but I eat them every once in a while now.

#20 Quiver0f10

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Posted 05 July 2011 - 08:15 PM

I've been yeast-free for over 2.5 years now. While I do eat pork, many yeast-free diet books recommend that you not. As for beans, I didn't eat them for over 2 years, but I eat them every once in a while now.


Thanks. I will try to add beans back in slowly after a few weeks and see how things go.

#21 illedoger

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Posted 30 November 2013 - 01:01 PM

The vegan candida diet vegetarian plan is easy to follow but additionally makes a lot of health sense.

There are many known reasons for being vegetarian and it's a matter of personal choice, but if you are coping with candida overgrowth it makes sense to avoid meat.

The choice is eating organic, free-range meat only but this is often pricey and does nevertheless contain a little bit of antibiotics.

The distinction is that natural standards only permit the use of antibiotics when essential.

The fact that animals are usually reared in a free-range environment does mean that the likelihood of disease and therefore antibiotic use is significantly reduced. Not to mention the methods tend to be more humane to animals.

So if you are vegetarian, <a href=http://top-diet.com/...iet-some-advice>vegetarian candida diet</a> is an excellent way to eliminate your overgrowth.

However the basics are simple, especially on the vegetarian plan.

Eat all the more fresh vegetables and salad you'd like. This consists of avocados, tomatoes, limes and lemons which are usually technically the only fruits allowed with this plan. All the fruit is to be avoided for a minimum of three weeks. See the general diet guidelines web page for more.

Potatoes and root veggies are also allowed.

Eat fresh seeds and shelled nuts (store in refrigerator).

Eat free-range, organic eggs.

Try Soya, rice and almond milk as alternatives to cow's milk, which is not allowed.

Eat unrefined and whole wheat such as brown rice, whole wheat grains pasta, quinoa, and oats.

A little natural butter is allowed because are cold-pressed oils such as for example rapeseed, olive, flax and sunflower.

The vegan candida diet normally follows the candida diet plan restrictions to eliminate animal meats. This vegan variation of a vegetarian diet plan also eliminates foods produced by honey, including eggs, animals and dairy products. A wholesome vegan diet uses minimum processed food items and often includes whole grains, legumes, more fresh vegetables and nut products, soy and fruits.

#22 illedoger

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Posted 30 November 2013 - 01:03 PM

The vegan candida diet vegetarian plan is simple to follow but also makes plenty of health sense.

There are many reasons for being vegetarian and it's really a matter of personal choice, but if you are coping with candida overgrowth it makes sense to avoid meat.

The alternative is eating organic, free-range meat only but this can be pricey and does nevertheless contain a small amount of antibiotics.

The distinction is that natural standards only permit the use of antibiotics when essential.

The fact that animals are reared in a free-range environment also means that the probability of disease and for that reason antibiotic use is significantly reduced. Not forgetting the methods tend to be more humane to animals.

So if you are vegetarian, <a href=http://top-diet.com/...iet-some-advice>candida diet vegetarian</a> is an excellent way to get rid of your overgrowth.

But the basics are simple, especially on the vegetarian strategy.

Eat all the more fresh vegetables and salad you'd like. This consists of avocados, tomatoes, limes and lemons which tend to be technically the only real fruits allowed on this plan. All other fruit is to be avoided for at the least three weeks. See the general diet guidelines web page for more.

Potatoes and root veggies are also allowed.

Eat fresh seeds and shelled nuts (store in refrigerator).

Eat free-range, organic eggs.

Try Soya, rice and almond milk as options to cow's milk, that is not allowed.

Eat unrefined and whole wheat grains such as for example brown rice, whole wheat grains pasta, quinoa, and oats.

A little organic butter is allowed because are cold-pressed oils such as olive, sunflower, rapeseed and flax.

The vegan candida diet plan naturally follows the candida diet plan restrictions to eliminate animal meats. This vegan variation of a vegetarian diet also eliminates foods produced by animals, honey, including eggs and milk products. A healthy vegan diet uses minimal processed food items and often includes wholegrains, legumes, more fresh vegetables and soy, nut products and fruits.


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