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#51 Colleen in NS

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Posted 16 May 2011 - 02:15 PM

*Teach the first 45 phonograms (there's a script in the manual)
*Drill those phonograms daily, by dictating them and by "flashing" them
*When the dc knows the first 45, begin teaching the spelling words in the Extended Ayres List (sample script in the manual)
*Continue teaching the phonograms until the dc knows all 70


You make it sound SO easy. Really? Is it really that easy?


Yes.

The older, blue green version is much, much easier to navigate and understand, IMO!!


:iagree: The red version before that, too. The white 5th edition is full of blither blather IMO. :D

I also like that Spalding has taught me how to think about phonics and reading and writing. I never knew that the letter "o" had three sounds, or thought about which sounds were most common, or what made "g" say g in goat and j in George. I like the rules too as I did not realize how helpful they can be when explaining why a word is spelled that way or how to decode a word in reading. I find a logical explanation helps both my child and me.


:iagree:

Can anyone tell me what the difference is between AAS & Spalding? Besides the obvious (tiles)?


Price. :D Whenever I read threads about WRTR and its spinoffs, I always conclude that it *really* has to do with what the teacher-Mom is willing or able to do. When I first started, there would have been NO WAY I could afford any of those other programs, so I plunged into learning WRTR. I did have help from my Spalding-trained teacher-mother, but she was far away, and advised me via e-mail, which isn't the same as handholding here at home. I did have to put some time into learning the method.

So how much writing is required in a day's lesson? Sentence wise? When you say put the words in a sentence, do they write the sentence? My son detests writing unless it is on his own in his journal lol. So I am just wondering about the amount of writing.


I only use WRTR to teach: how to read, how to spell, how to print, and how to write cursive. I don't use the writing or composition portions. I don't like how those skills are taught in WRTR, so we use other methods for those. But like I believe Ellie meant, WRTR will give you basic literacy skills. And you can build from there, however you want. So anyway, I'd say over the years I've spent 15-30 minutes a day, first teaching my kids the phonograms, how to draw them, etc., and then moving on to the spelling list. But I didn't spend hours a day on "WRTR."

Sit down in the evening with a cup of tea and WRTR. Read it from cover to cover (yes, it should take you more than one evening, and yes, including the spelling list and everything--cover to cover). When you're finished, read it again from cover to cover, making notes to yourself with pencil. When you're finished, read it again; this time you should be able to figure out what your daily class time will look like, what happens next, and so on.


But, OP, if you're just going to use WRTR for spelling/reading/printing/cursive, just stick to those chapters if you have the thick 5th version, lol.

And :iagree: with Ellie - it will take you a little while, but it's not impossible. The biggest thing that helped me to learn the method was, after learning the phonograms myself and how to draw them, was to start my own spelling notebook. THAT is where the learning really kicked in. Then I could turn around and teach it to my kids.

Would I teach both children at once? Or would it be better to just use it with my 1st grader? What do you go to after spalding if it only covers to 3rd grade?


I did my children individually - they are three grades apart, though. I think I saw that you have a pre-schooler - you *could* start teaching the phonogram sounds, if he/she is ready.

WRTR can go far beyond grade 3. You don't have to finish it by a certain grade. I remember when my ds finished the spelling list partway through grade 3, and then I was totally lost on what to do. I clearly remember posting here about my lostness (almost five years ago!), and Ellie telling me "congratulations" and OhElizabeth saying "wowee," but I didn't know what else to do after that! I still wanted him to have the analytical practice, so I started picking more difficult words out of science texts that ds was interested in, lol. We'd analyze them in the spelling notebook. We did that for another year or so, then quit. I figured he knew the sounds and rules and analytical method for sounding out a new word well enough. But my dd10, in 4th grade now, is only part way through the list. Which is fine. We'll just keep going til the list is done, or until I feel she has solidified the sounds, rules, and the method of sounding out new words. She just needs more practice in these things than her brother does. But the great thing about WRTR is you can rush it or stretch it out, according to each child. And as I found out, you can add words if you finish the list "early." lol

Does everyone that has posted on here use it for all LA subjects or just spelling?


Spelling/reading/printing/cursive only. For composition in elementary grades I use WWE, and for grammar I use R&S.

#52 joyfulhomeschooler

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Posted 16 May 2011 - 04:30 PM

Yes.



:iagree: The red version before that, too. The white 5th edition is full of blither blather IMO. :D



:iagree:



Price. :D Whenever I read threads about WRTR and its spinoffs, I always conclude that it *really* has to do with what the teacher-Mom is willing or able to do. When I first started, there would have been NO WAY I could afford any of those other programs, so I plunged into learning WRTR. I did have help from my Spalding-trained teacher-mother, but she was far away, and advised me via e-mail, which isn't the same as handholding here at home. I did have to put some time into learning the method.



I only use WRTR to teach: how to read, how to spell, how to print, and how to write cursive. I don't use the writing or composition portions. I don't like how those skills are taught in WRTR, so we use other methods for those. But like I believe Ellie meant, WRTR will give you basic literacy skills. And you can build from there, however you want. So anyway, I'd say over the years I've spent 15-30 minutes a day, first teaching my kids the phonograms, how to draw them, etc., and then moving on to the spelling list. But I didn't spend hours a day on "WRTR."



But, OP, if you're just going to use WRTR for spelling/reading/printing/cursive, just stick to those chapters if you have the thick 5th version, lol.

And :iagree: with Ellie - it will take you a little while, but it's not impossible. The biggest thing that helped me to learn the method was, after learning the phonograms myself and how to draw them, was to start my own spelling notebook. THAT is where the learning really kicked in. Then I could turn around and teach it to my kids.



I did my children individually - they are three grades apart, though. I think I saw that you have a pre-schooler - you *could* start teaching the phonogram sounds, if he/she is ready.

WRTR can go far beyond grade 3. You don't have to finish it by a certain grade. I remember when my ds finished the spelling list partway through grade 3, and then I was totally lost on what to do. I clearly remember posting here about my lostness (almost five years ago!), and Ellie telling me "congratulations" and OhElizabeth saying "wowee," but I didn't know what else to do after that! I still wanted him to have the analytical practice, so I started picking more difficult words out of science texts that ds was interested in, lol. We'd analyze them in the spelling notebook. We did that for another year or so, then quit. I figured he knew the sounds and rules and analytical method for sounding out a new word well enough. But my dd10, in 4th grade now, is only part way through the list. Which is fine. We'll just keep going til the list is done, or until I feel she has solidified the sounds, rules, and the method of sounding out new words. She just needs more practice in these things than her brother does. But the great thing about WRTR is you can rush it or stretch it out, according to each child. And as I found out, you can add words if you finish the list "early." lol



Spelling/reading/printing/cursive only. For composition in elementary grades I use WWE, and for grammar I use R&S.


Thanks so much! This is very informative. :) Keep them coming I am learning loads!

#53 joyfulhomeschooler

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Posted 16 May 2011 - 04:40 PM

SWR isn't nearly as spendy as AAS or Phonics Road. I spent under $100 and had everything (except the consumable learning logs which run $3-5 each per year per kid) for my dc until I add in a grammar component in 3rd grade.

We use SWR for phonics, spelling, and informal grammar until 3rd when I add in grammar. I add a writing program in 4th.

I agree with Oh Elizabeth that the programs listed have their +/- depending your kids & your teaching methods. I never tried WRTR because my local library doesn't have it and after researching what was out there at the time, decided I could wrap my head around SWR.

I love concept of the Spaulding method & like the way Sanseri (SWR's author) has modified it (made it "Sanseri's Method") in SWR/Wise Guide. My kids don't like it nearly as much as I and will be glad we're taking a break from it next year.

True! I think it cost me over $100 for AAS for two children and that is JUST spelling. Plus it wouldn't even last a whole school year. So, in comparison I gues it isn't that expensive :)

#54 MyLittleBears

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Posted 16 May 2011 - 04:42 PM

For those of you that use SWR, is using Teaching Reading at Home with The Writing Road to Reading, basically the same as this program? I know it is the predecessor to SWR but.... is there less of a learning curve? I have the green one and the old original phonogram cards +this book from a friend who taught her now college aged kids with this. Just wondering...

Edited by MyLittleBears, 16 May 2011 - 07:31 PM.


#55 Ellie

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Posted 16 May 2011 - 04:52 PM

I love concept of the Spaulding method & like the way Sanseri (SWR's author) has modified it (made it "Sanseri's Method") in SWR/Wise Guide.

*psst* That's "Spalding.":D

#56 Ellie

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Posted 16 May 2011 - 05:02 PM

So, if I was going to use spalding for just spelling, I could instead just use our AAS that we already have and it would most likely get us to the same spot spelling wise?

Well, AAS isn't as comprehensive as Spalding, but I have seen many good comments about it. :-)

You said 3hrs in a classroom. How long in a home setting does this method take?

If you just do spelling (which includes penmanship and capitalization/punctuation), then maybe an hour. Of course, the spelling lesson is teaching the dc to read, too, so it isn't doing spelling the way it would be if you handed your dc a R&S spelling workbook, KWIM?

You used it with your children if I remember correctly?


I did Spalding with younger dd. I also taught it in a one-room school to a group of about 10 dc, first grade through high school.

Would I teach both children at once? Or would it be better to just use it with my 1st grader?


Oh, certainly you would start them together. At some point you would want to have some separate "class time" with them, as the older one will do a spelling notebook with the rule pages and whatnot while the younger one will not.

What do you go to after spalding if it only covers to 3rd grade?


A friend's dc went to a Christian school that required all of its students, kindergarten through sixth, to do Spalding every year. ;-) I wouldn't say that Spalding "only" covers up to third grade. I would probably do it so that the child has done at least two spelling notebooks (dc don't do the notebook with the rule pages until third grade/8yo). By then I would expect pretty darn good spelling skills and reading level, and I would probably be doing reading lessons as well as spelling lessons, even if I weren't doing grammar or writing.

#57 Cricket on the Hearth

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Posted 16 May 2011 - 06:55 PM

*psst* That's "Spalding.":D


I was waiting for that :lol:!

#58 joyfulhomeschooler

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Posted 16 May 2011 - 11:19 PM

So if I was able to get my hands on one of the older editions of WRTR I should try for the red? Our library has the blue/green can't tell color from pic very well. I have two friends that have it. One has the white newest edition and one has the red (just checked with her and she said it has cards to tear out and use). What version should I get first to read through? I would rather start with the easiest to understand so I don't get discouraged.

Also, what is the best way to review SWR since my library doesn't have it and I don't want to spend a whole bunch and then not like it.

#59 Colleen in NS

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Posted 17 May 2011 - 06:54 AM

So if I was able to get my hands on one of the older editions of WRTR I should try for the red? Our library has the blue/green can't tell color from pic very well. I have two friends that have it. One has the white newest edition and one has the red (just checked with her and she said it has cards to tear out and use). What version should I get first to read through? I would rather start with the easiest to understand so I don't get discouraged.


Blue or red is fine. They are just a LOT easier to read - more user friendly - than the white one. I wouldn't stress about it. Get both, since you have access to them!

#60 Dinsfamily

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Posted 17 May 2011 - 07:57 AM

Also, what is the best way to review SWR since my library doesn't have it and I don't want to spend a whole bunch and then not like it.


There is a yahoo group that has samples but unless you have someone who owns it near you, you won't be able to put your hands on it and really get a feel for it. There might be a trainer nearby you that could give you a look-see. Not being sure about it was one of my big hangups and why my dh had to just tell me to buy it. I'd been waffling for weeks. However, I'd read both the white editions and blue/green editions of WRTR several times cover to cover and couldn't figure it out. My options were either to go to SWR or buy a Spalding manual. I hadn't heard great thing about the manuals for homeschool use so took a blind leap with SWR. Thankfully, it was just what I needed.

I would suggest reading WRTR cover to cover several times. Try both an older edition and the new white edition. None of that will cost you anything, right? See if you can figure out how to implement it in your home. If you can't or would simply like the ease of the sentences and enrichments planned out for you, then SWR would be worth a try.

#61 Ellie

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Posted 17 May 2011 - 08:25 AM

So if I was able to get my hands on one of the older editions of WRTR I should try for the red? Our library has the blue/green can't tell color from pic very well. I have two friends that have it. One has the white newest edition and one has the red (just checked with her and she said it has cards to tear out and use). What version should I get first to read through? I would rather start with the easiest to understand so I don't get discouraged.

Also, what is the best way to review SWR since my library doesn't have it and I don't want to spend a whole bunch and then not like it.

Seems to me that I have heard that there were some "issues" with the third edition (red)...I forget what. The teal is the fourth edition. The white is the fifth edition. Black was the first edition. I have owned all of them. :-)

The reason that the fifth edition is so good is that it has all the sample dialogues and charts and stuff; there's not an extra word or phrase in it. These really are helpful, so don't eschew acquiring it if you have the chance.


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