Jump to content

What's with the ads?


Photo

US or World Geography first? And which curriculum?

geography

  • Please log in to reply
11 replies to this topic

What's with the ads?

#1 cbmrj777

cbmrj777

    Hive Mind Level 5 Worker: Forager Bee

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 374 posts

Posted 26 April 2011 - 02:50 PM

I've searched and read many threads about geography but I am hoping y'all could guide me a bit here. Just too many choices! :001_smile:

I have a 2 part question:

I'm looking primarily for my 13yo DD although anything in the geography department my little ones (especially DD2) will tag along. DD1 is an unmotivated kid. We've pretty much just focused on the bare essentials because in the past, getting them done was enough to pull my hair out. But that leaves gaping holes in other areas which I am looking to patch up. She has never really had US geography or World Geography. She doesn't know her states/capitals and besides "major" countries (Africa, US, Canada, Mexico, and the United Kingdom), she couldn't name any countries on the map. I want to spend the next couple of years going over geography. (We have Geography map reading skills covered using Discovering the World of Geography.)

1) Which should I do first? US or World? Does it even matter?

2) What curriculum would work well with my unmotivated, hands-on, hates-too-much-writing learner? I want something fairly simple that she will learn from yet not be too "dumbed down" for her age. I've printed out samples from tons of different curriculum and notebooking pages, yet I can't seem to decide on anything. :confused:

For US Geography these have caught my eye:

  • Trail to US Geography - not many samples to see just what all is included... is it hands-on or primarily writing oriented?
  • Roadtrip USA - for grades K-4th grade but looks like it has enough neat tidbits on each state and hands-on projects... maybe boost this up with some add-on things to make this better for an older student?? If so, then what would give it enough oomph to make it simple yet challenging for her age? (Or maybe I *should* just keep it simple since I always have to fight her on school work anyway?? :rolleyes: )
  • Beautiful Feet Geography - both DH and I love the looks of this BUT DH thinks it would add on too much reading for DD and not enough hands-on. She already will be having reading from History and Literature. I don't know. Maybe we are under-estimating her interest/abilities. Then again maybe I'm over-ambitious?
  • pull something together myself using blackline maps, library books on each state, notebooking pages to complete, and books like Cooking around the USA.
For my little ones tagging along, they will most likely use Roadtrip USA and/or *maybe* Trail Guide or Cantering the Country.

For World Geography:

  • make my own using an Atlas, black outline maps, and Window on the World
  • Runkle Geography - but this is more physical geography than political and perhaps better suited for when DD gets older (9th-10th grade?)
  • Bob Jones Geography - really really like this one but again it is more geared for High School use (especially 9th grade which BJ has it scheduled)
  • Trail Guide to World Geography - Same concern... not enough samples; not really open and go
For my little ones, I'll just use Little Passports along with a DIY reading of living books on each country.

For both US and World geography I do plan to incorporate games like "Stack the Countries", "Scrambled States", and sheppardsoftware.com into whatever we end up doing.

We will be following a history cycle, starting with the Ancients next. I intend on including mapping ala MOH. But I am mostly concerned that DD gets the basics down. Geography does not have to line up with history.

Thank you in advance for any thoughts. :001_smile:

#2 lorrainejmc

lorrainejmc

    Hive Mind Queen Bee

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 903 posts

Posted 26 April 2011 - 03:36 PM

I have the Trail Guide to World Geography for my dd9 plus the notebooking pages. It is not at all hands on, to add that you need other resources that are mentioned in the guide, such as geog through art and eat your way around the world. Also, it is a lot of atlas work that dd needed me to guide her through every step. I don't find it very user friendly and have shelved it for a year or two.

A better option for the younger ones IMO is Galloping the Globe from the same publishers, it's the world version of CTC you mentioned. We are using that now with 9, 7 and 5 yr olds.

#3 Scuff

Scuff

    Hive Mind Queen Bee

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 2100 posts

Posted 26 April 2011 - 03:47 PM

We're using the Star Spangled States Book. We really like it. It's not fancy; a general overview. But is open and go and the kids are learning.

#4 cbmrj777

cbmrj777

    Hive Mind Level 5 Worker: Forager Bee

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 374 posts

Posted 26 April 2011 - 04:11 PM

I have the Trail Guide to World Geography for my dd9 plus the notebooking pages. It is not at all hands on, to add that you need other resources that are mentioned in the guide, such as geog through art and eat your way around the world. Also, it is a lot of atlas work that dd needed me to guide her through every step. I don't find it very user friendly and have shelved it for a year or two.

A better option for the younger ones IMO is Galloping the Globe from the same publishers, it's the world version of CTC you mentioned. We are using that now with 9, 7 and 5 yr olds.


Thank you for this. That knocks Trail Guide off our list. We must have hands-on arts/craft type projects. I'll take a look at CTC. :)

We're using the Star Spangled States Book. We really like it. It's not fancy; a general overview. But is open and go and the kids are learning.


DH and I looked at it but it didn't seem to have any hands-on either. Just read and fill out a worksheet.

Thank you.
Love to hear more opinions! :001_smile:

#5 Scuff

Scuff

    Hive Mind Queen Bee

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 2100 posts

Posted 26 April 2011 - 05:20 PM

No, you're right. It isn't hands on. Just a workbook. I like it for that reason- it's quick and easy and fulfills what I want it to right now without adding much burden. Sorry. I'm tired and didn't read your first post very carefully :)

#6 Mrs Twain

Mrs Twain

    Aspiring Master Gardener

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 2100 posts

Posted 26 April 2011 - 08:17 PM

We do geography completely differently than anyone I know, in case you are interested:

I read one chapter aloud per week to the kids of Hillyer's "A Child's Geography of the World" book. This is a great gem of a book, though the downside is that the last edit was in 1951! Most of geography doesn't change, but there are some things that you have to edit along the way since some things do change. This book starts going through basic ideas about the world, states of the USA, and then on to individual countries. If you have ever read CHOW, it is just like that except for geography.

I have two big laminated maps from Geomatters (one world map and one USA map, one side is labelled and the other is blank outlines for the student to test his knowledge). After we read the Hillyer book, we find the places on the map. We also review the places that we learned previously.

I am also looking at Geomatters "Ultimate Guide to Geography" which are supplemental resources that you can supposedly add into any geography/history program.

I am also planning to incorporate the ideas from "The Core" book geography chapter, which explains how to help your kids learn to draw the world, one continent at a time, including the countries and physical features.

Sorry if this is too "out there," but I thought I would share what we do since you have looked at so many things and haven't found what you like yet. Our kids know a lot of geography for their ages, and I'm very happy with what we are using. My husband and I often say that if we knew everything in the Hillyer book, we would be quite smart!

#7 cbmrj777

cbmrj777

    Hive Mind Level 5 Worker: Forager Bee

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 374 posts

Posted 26 April 2011 - 10:00 PM

No, you're right. It isn't hands on. Just a workbook. I like it for that reason- it's quick and easy and fulfills what I want it to right now without adding much burden. Sorry. I'm tired and didn't read your first post very carefully :)


Oh gosh no! Don't apologize! I appreciate your opinions! :001_smile:

We do geography completely differently than anyone I know, in case you are interested:

I read one chapter aloud per week to the kids of Hillyer's "A Child's Geography of the World" book. This is a great gem of a book, though the downside is that the last edit was in 1951! Most of geography doesn't change, but there are some things that you have to edit along the way since some things do change. This book starts going through basic ideas about the world, states of the USA, and then on to individual countries. If you have ever read CHOW, it is just like that except for geography.

I have two big laminated maps from Geomatters (one world map and one USA map, one side is labelled and the other is blank outlines for the student to test his knowledge). After we read the Hillyer book, we find the places on the map. We also review the places that we learned previously.

I am also looking at Geomatters "Ultimate Guide to Geography" which are supplemental resources that you can supposedly add into any geography/history program.

I am also planning to incorporate the ideas from "The Core" book geography chapter, which explains how to help your kids learn to draw the world, one continent at a time, including the countries and physical features.

Sorry if this is too "out there," but I thought I would share what we do since you have looked at so many things and haven't found what you like yet. Our kids know a lot of geography for their ages, and I'm very happy with what we are using. My husband and I often say that if we knew everything in the Hillyer book, we would be quite smart!


I appreciate any ideas and suggestions. Seems like the "perfect" curriculum isn't out there and this looks like a great idea! I'll definitely look more into this book. Thank you! :001_smile:

#8 Mallory

Mallory

    Hive Mind Queen Bee

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 1896 posts

Posted 27 April 2011 - 10:56 AM

I think you should Look at Trail Guide again.

Sure the basic assingment each day is writing, but it is only answer two quesions, and if you get the notebook pages that isn't very much writing.

But I feel like there are all kins of hands on activites, especially if you include coloring maps as hands on activities.

Here is a sample of a very normal week,
Week 8
-Mapping assignments, to be done on outline maps
-make a salt dough or clay map
-make some foods from south america (there is a list of foods, but you have to find recipes on your own)
-make a jigsaw map of South America
-learn about the culture of SA (there is a website for pictures, stories, songs, and more)
-learn about earthquakes and tsunamis
-answer challenge questions (need The Ultimate Geography Guide)
-Learn about animals of SA and add to your notebook (there is a list of animals) and figure out how climate and terrain work for those animals
-make a chart of SA facts
-make a crossword puzzle
-clip SA newspaper articles
-work on your geography dictionary (make drawings of features like delta and define)
-build a small scale of the Inca ruins of Machu Picchu with colombian coffee clay (from the book Geography through art, but I bet that is enough info you could figure it out with just a few searches)

That seems to me like a lot of hands-on activies. Most of those could be done with very little writing (again, unless mapping and coloring maps is a problem). Yes, it isn't really open and go, but all of your kids could use it so that might even things out. My older boys are using it next year and they are answering the middle questions and teaching the easy questions to my 5yo. He won't have to write anything down (as it is really more for the older boys benefit).

Using week 8 as an example still, these are the questions for day 1
--Name the SA countries clockwise in order starting with French Guiana and ending with Brazil. and Which is the largest?
They will answer these carefully and neatly, the first with a neat list, the second with a complete sentance.

Then they will figure out the answers to the two easy questions.
--What is the largest country in SA? and What does a star or a dot inside a circle usually represent?
Finally, they will track down their little brother and, using maps and globes and having fun, go over the answers to these two questions with him.

#9 Cornerstone Classical

Cornerstone Classical

    Hive Mind Queen Bee

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 752 posts

Posted 27 April 2011 - 11:16 AM

If you are interested in geography with a missions/bible emphasis look at Exploring Countries and Cultures from My Father's World.

#10 mamaofblessings

mamaofblessings

    Hive Mind Queen Bee

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 2253 posts

Posted 27 April 2011 - 11:52 AM

We did world first. Galloping the Globe and IMO is great for a spine BUT you have to prepare extra's and to me that was unappealing. I spent several weeks this past summer prepping for it and when it came time to do it....we flew through it because my kids loved the hands on and cooking parts of it. I did a lapbook for each country and such...

However I sold it and don't plan on using it again.

I need open and go and hands on that is already laid out for me.

So next year we're doing ROAD TRIP USA from Confessions of a Homeschooler and I'm super pumped about it! She has it so full of info about each state, review, coloring pages, fun facts and recipes and MORE!! It's way more engaging and all it's going to take from me is PRINT, PLAN and FILE..unlike Galloping the Globe..you have to do ALL your own add in work as just the book is NOT enough! I ended up SPENDING hours on enchanted learning.com finding printable coloring pages for each area we studied, activities, paper dolls so the kids could "dress up" for the trip and such..I even joined the GTG yahoo group to get those extras and still it was fun for ME. The kids loved it but the prep work WASN'T worth it to me!

#11 cbmrj777

cbmrj777

    Hive Mind Level 5 Worker: Forager Bee

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 374 posts

Posted 27 April 2011 - 08:10 PM

I think you should Look at Trail Guide again.

Sure the basic assingment each day is writing, but it is only answer two quesions, and if you get the notebook pages that isn't very much writing.

But I feel like there are all kins of hands on activites, especially if you include coloring maps as hands on activities.


Thank you for your detailed response! It does sound like more than what their few samples show.

If you are interested in geography with a missions/bible emphasis look at Exploring Countries and Cultures from My Father's World.


Is MFW ECC geography only or does it contain other subjects? (I'm sure I can find the answer quickly off their website! :tongue_smilie: ) Thanks for bringing this option. :001_smile:

We did world first. Galloping the Globe and IMO is great for a spine BUT you have to prepare extra's and to me that was unappealing. I spent several weeks this past summer prepping for it and when it came time to do it....we flew through it because my kids loved the hands on and cooking parts of it. I did a lapbook for each country and such...

However I sold it and don't plan on using it again.

I need open and go and hands on that is already laid out for me.

So next year we're doing ROAD TRIP USA from Confessions of a Homeschooler and I'm super pumped about it! She has it so full of info about each state, review, coloring pages, fun facts and recipes and MORE!! It's way more engaging and all it's going to take from me is PRINT, PLAN and FILE..unlike Galloping the Globe..you have to do ALL your own add in work as just the book is NOT enough! I ended up SPENDING hours on enchanted learning.com finding printable coloring pages for each area we studied, activities, paper dolls so the kids could "dress up" for the trip and such..I even joined the GTG yahoo group to get those extras and still it was fun for ME. The kids loved it but the prep work WASN'T worth it to me!


I emailed Confessions of a Homeschooler about the age group of this because I'll be honest I LOVE the looks of this for my youngest ones. It looks like so much fun! And so much is included: jeopardy style game cards, color sheets, projects for each state, etc. Here was her response:

It's listed for younger kids, but if you added in some extra reading, and maybe have her do reports on famous people or places as you go that would probably help beef it up for her. The coloring pages might be too 'little kid' for her though, but I guess you could let her decide that, maybe she'd still like to do that kind of activity.

I have a bunch of biography type books in the extra reading section too that
you could easily use.

Erica

www.confessionsofahomeschooler.com

Since you have the entire download, would you agree with her? How hard do you think it would be to beef up RoadTrip USA to a middle school level? Would it be too much work to do so? When I showed DD the sample pages immediately she liked it but when she learned of the age group, she kinda balked and then asked if I could find something "exactly like this" but for her age. :rolleyes:

#12 Helen73

Helen73

    Just Visiting

  • Members
  • 3 posts

Posted 13 May 2011 - 04:46 AM

I think you should have a look at this instructive website geographic game: www.geography-map-games.com. You have to click on the cities, capitals, states asked of differents countries in the world (USA, Commonwealth, Europe...). You can test your geographical knowledge of the world or just your country.



Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: geography

What's with the ads?