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Question about the Tiner books for science


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#1 WABeth

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Posted 16 April 2008 - 11:19 AM

I had a chance to browse through a couple of John Tiner's Exploring the World of ... books at a homeschool meeting last night. I really liked the narrative style and historical elements. It wasn't until I was reading some information about them on Amazon this morning that I realized they may have some Christian content. If you have used these can you describe what, if any religious content or views are expressed and whether you think a secular homeschool family could use these comfortably. I am particularly interested in:

Exploring the Earth
Exploring the World of Mathematics

but also possibly:

Exploring the World of Chemistry
Exploring the World of Physics

Thanks!!

#2 Carol in Cal.

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Posted 16 April 2008 - 10:19 PM

I am almost done with the Chemistry book, and it gives a lot of biographical information about early chemists who made key discoveries. One of the biographical points for several of the scientists is writing or other evidence that their Christian beliefs were important to them, and/or helped them to believe in advance that a Creator would have put together a systematic creation.

Personally, I am Christian, and this was pretty exciting to me--I have not used Christian science books before, and I like the inclusion of this documentable, real history in this text. If I were not Christian, I think that in this particular book, in the way that this information is presented, I would still have found it to be interesting history and to shed some light on the way of thinking behind some of these discoveries.

However, I don't know whether or not I would feel the same about the earth science or biology texts. I could imagine some criticism of evolution or of old earth beliefs that might not be acceptable to a non-Christian. I don't know whether they are present or not, but I would be more cautious in using those specific ones without checking on this.

To me, though, there is a big difference between saying, Wow, look what God made and how cool it is! and saying, One of the influences on this chemist's life was his belief in a Creator Who could organize everything to suit His purposes. And it is the latter that I have seen so far in the chemistry book.

#3 OnTheBrink

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Posted 16 April 2008 - 10:27 PM

I just bought both the math and planet earth books at our home school convention last week. I haven't had a chance to look them over thoroughly, but I did buy them from the Institute for Creation Research both, so I'm guessing there would be some Christianity in there. I'll have to go look now! LOL

#4 WABeth

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Posted 16 April 2008 - 11:23 PM

Thank you for your replies. This was helpful to me.

#5 Peela

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Posted 16 April 2008 - 11:57 PM

Well I am secular, my kids are positively allergic to too many Christian references, and they both felt they were fine.
My daughter in particular loved the History of Medicine book, but we have also read the Chemistry one, and i have bought the Mathematics one ready to go. I also bought the Science course that Tiner co-authored and I found the amount of Christian stuff in it to be minimal and very manageable.
It could be that a Christian and a non Christian would "see" different things in these Christian books, but it hasn't been a problem here, and I can recommend all his books highly.

#6 WABeth

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Posted 17 April 2008 - 01:00 PM

Well I am secular, my kids are positively allergic to too many Christian references, and they both felt they were fine.
My daughter in particular loved the History of Medicine book, but we have also read the Chemistry one, and i have bought the Mathematics one ready to go. I also bought the Science course that Tiner co-authored and I found the amount of Christian stuff in it to be minimal and very manageable.
It could be that a Christian and a non Christian would "see" different things in these Christian books, but it hasn't been a problem here, and I can recommend all his books highly.


Thank you Peela, that is what I was hoping to hear!

#7 Mallory

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Posted 17 April 2008 - 01:19 PM

I just bought World of Chemistry for next year, and this thread reaffirms my feelings about it. I haven't had a chance to read it yet, but it looked both interesting and secular enough I can handle it.

#8 mcconnellboys

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Posted 17 April 2008 - 08:20 PM

We used the one for chemistry along with other things, during logic stage, and it was not over the top.

#9 Fourmother

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Posted 17 April 2008 - 08:26 PM

I've never heard to these books, but your descriptions make them sound very interesting. For what ages/grades are they written?

#10 mom2abcd

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Posted 17 April 2008 - 10:29 PM

I've never heard to these books, but your descriptions make them sound very interesting. For what ages/grades are they written?


They're wonderful! You can learn more about John Hudson Tiner's books here:
http://www.christian...WW&view=details

Click on his name to see other titles.

#11 asher

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Posted 17 April 2008 - 11:09 PM

Could you all see using the Earth Curriculum for a 2nd grader?

#12 mcconnellboys

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Posted 19 April 2008 - 09:12 PM

Well, my children are very visual and I think they would have found it very dry at that age. But I think they're good for logic stage. I wouldn't use them alone as I feel they are more about the history and developments within particular scientific areas and don't really cover the details of the science, itself, as much.

#13 Carol in Cal.

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Posted 19 April 2008 - 09:29 PM

Well, my children are very visual and I think they would have found it very dry at that age. But I think they're good for logic stage. I wouldn't use them alone as I feel they are more about the history and developments within particular scientific areas and don't really cover the details of the science, itself, as much.


But, for instance, the RS4K chemistry coverage of covalent vs. ionic bonds was good but didn't have a lot of examples. The Tiner book didn't use those terms (its main weakness, IMO), but it did cover the periodic table columns that are most identified with those types of bonds even though it didn't use them by name. So, using the two together improved retention and understanding of the periodic table. Great pairing.

#14 mcconnellboys

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Posted 20 April 2008 - 05:47 PM

Exactly. I think these are excellent to flesh out other programs! A perfect complement.....


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