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What causes your rosacea to flare up?


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#1 AuntieM

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Posted 05 August 2010 - 10:27 AM

I have a new trigger that I cannot pinpoint. Most annoying..

#2 Mejane

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Posted 05 August 2010 - 03:56 PM

Well, I don't know if this will help you, but for my son, who has extremely sensitive skin and mild rosacea, it can be almost anything - detergents, fruit fuzz, the cat, the sun, hot showers... It also seems the more he messes with his skin, the worse it gets.

#3 G5052

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Posted 05 August 2010 - 03:58 PM

I'm in misery every August.

#4 AuntieM

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Posted 05 August 2010 - 04:02 PM

I'm in misery every August.


Maybe that's it. Hot & windy here the last two weeks (think blast furnace:glare:).

#5 Julie in CA

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Posted 05 August 2010 - 04:11 PM

Heat, and stress.

#6 mcconnellboys

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Posted 05 August 2010 - 09:51 PM

I've just been diagnosed with it and have just found that extreme heat and humidity have caused a flare for me the past week.....

#7 hornblower

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Posted 05 August 2010 - 09:57 PM

Just an FYI that The Cosmetics Cop did an online radio show on rosacea tonight. It should be archived & avail for listening soon:

http://www.cosmetics...nt Announcement

#8 Cafelattee

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Posted 05 August 2010 - 10:05 PM

my trigger are wine and hot tubs:tongue_smilie:

A few of my little joys in life I had to let go of

But I am still able to get in the sun without a flare up and I can still workout/sweat without a flare up

I also react to retinal (anti aging creams)

#9 nestof3

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Posted 05 August 2010 - 10:44 PM

I really don't know with mine. My skin is much calmer looking late at night. Wine doesn't seem to affect it.

Heat does -- esp. when I open the oven door or the blow-dryer. I think it flares up when I'm nervous (I also perspire a lot when I'm nervous). It's not your regular jitters kind of nervous either. It's often just being around people.

#10 Lizzie in Ma

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Posted 06 August 2010 - 07:19 AM

Alcohol, sun and caffeine trigger mine to which I say touch cookies, I am not going without any of the 3. :D

Fortunately I just get very red, my sister gets little blisters so she is on medication. I just look like I have a sunburn.

#11 nestof3

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Posted 06 August 2010 - 07:55 AM

I just look flushed too. I've never had any bumps or anything else. I thought caffeine would help because it constricts the blood vessels. I'm sticking to it. ;)

Fortunately I just get very red, my sister gets little blisters so she is on medication. I just look like I have a sunburn.



#12 Negin

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Posted 09 September 2010 - 04:39 AM

Read this a while back from Dr. Ann Louise Gittleman's newsletter:

Low stomach acid has been linked to this increasingly prevalent skin problem.

Risk factors include fair skin, a family history of rosacea, and numerous triggers that may vary for different individuals: corticosteroids, drugs that dilate the blood vessels (including some blood pressure meds), hot baths and saunas, hot foods and beverages, spicy foods, stress (particularly anger or embarrassment), strenuous exercise, sunlight, and temperature extremes.

Rosacea tends to be more serious for men if they ignore this problem. But it strikes women more often, particularly during the menopause transition. Anyone between the ages of 20 and 60 may develop this condition.
Dr. Ann Louise’s Take:

The medical community can’t say for sure what exactly causes rosacea. But recent Greek research links chronic sun exposure to this condition, so use natural sun protection (with SPF of 15 or higher) that blocks UVA and UVB radiation.

If you blush easily and show signs of rosacea, record what you’re eating and drinking to help identify your own triggers. Cheese, chocolate, citrus fruits and juices, nightshade family veggies (eggplant and tomatoes), and seafood (lobster and shrimp) worsen this condition in some people.

Also avoid sugary and refined foods with artificial food coloring, preservatives, and MSG. Aspartame and NutraSweet cause noticeable flushing in many people with rosacea.

Blackberries, blueberries, and cherries are vascular constrictors that assist in reducing redness. I’ve found that flavonoid-rich cranberries tonify blood vessels, helping to reduce the redness of rosacea.

The Right Treatment

Because rosacea tends to be cyclical, periodic detox is useful. Just be sure to modify your detox program to meet your body’s seasonal needs as Fat Flush for Life does. In winter, that means warming foods (like Hot Lemon Toddy, which kick-starts elimination in cold weather, soups, and steamed veggies) rather than raw foods. Always allow hot beverages to cool at least to body temperature to avoid facial flushing.

I’m a great believer that beauty is far more than skin deep. Both B vitamins and GLA (evening primrose oil) will help improve your complexion. I’ve also seen many women obtain outstanding results from progesterone, which makes sense since hormonal changes often trigger rosacea.
Above all, treat your skin very gently: Don’t rub or touch your face too often. Avoid facial products containing alcohol or other irritants. Use only those labeled non-comedogenic to prevent clogged pores.


The American Academy of Dermatology has found topical creams with green tea helpful for rosacea, and another study has shown that topical vitamin B3 (niacin) improves this condition. According to research at the University of British Columbia, a natural cream with azelaic acid is as effective as topical metronidazole in treating pimples—and slightly better at reducing redness without encouraging the growth of fungus or drug-resistant bacteria.

Doctors often prescribe oral antibiotics (because they work faster than topical drugs) for their anti-inflammatory properties. Even so, you may need to take these meds for a month or so before you see results—and they can cause diarrhea and other digestive distress.

Interestingly, research has linked rosacea to low stomach acid. For most people, hydrochloric acid (HCl) or stomach acid, which knocks out dangerous bacteria—but not friendly flora—appears to work as a natural antibiotic, without causing the unwanted side effects of these medicines—including drug-resistant “superbugs.”

The Acid Test

Unless you have ulcers or have been diagnosed with a pre-ulcerative condition, you might want to test for HCl, the good stomach acid. Take 500 to 550 mg of betaine hydrochloride (combined with pepsin) with your next meal and carefully observe how you feel.

A burning belly or face probably means that you already have sufficient stomach acid—and may, instead, benefit from taking digestive enzymes with meals to support nutrient absorption. But if you don’t notice any extreme symptoms, do as I do and take a formula like HCL + 2 to restore normal acidity and ensure you’re absorbing the nutrients in your diet and supplements.


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